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  • 1.
    Ali, Kamran
    et al.
    Qatar University,QU Health, College of Dental Medicine, Doha, Qatar.
    Du, Xiangyun
    Aalborg UNESCO Center for PBL, Department of Planning, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Lundberg, Adrian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of School Development and Leadership (SOL).
    Does problem-based learning facilitate enactment of learner agency in undergraduate dental curricula? A Q study2023In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 27, no 4, p. 823-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Addressing a literature gap on leaner agency in health profession education, this study explores students' perceptions on which aspects of a problem-based learning (PBL) environment cradle their leaner agency enactment.

    METHODS: Thirty-eight students from a newly established undergraduate dental medicine programme in Qatar participated in the study. Q methodology was adopted to collect and analyse data both qualitatively and quantitatively. A 40-statement Q-set was established based on a proposed conceptual framework of learner agency in PBL, including three dimensions-intrapersonal, behavioural and environmental.

    RESULTS: Q methodological factor analysis identified four significantly different student viewpoints, which underscored participants' enactment of learner agency addressing the intrapersonal, behavioural and environmental dimensions of the conceptual framework. Despite differences in opinion regarding sources of learner agency, the four student viewpoints unanimously underscore the importance of PBL facilitators' expertise to nurture and develop agency amongst undergraduate students. Post-sorting qualitative data further confirmed the quantitative analysis. Time constraints and workload were identified as the main challenges by the participants.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study explored enactment of learner agency as perceived by undergraduate dental students in a PBL curriculum. The findings of this study provide new insights into participants' subjective understanding of learner agency in a PBL curriculum in dentistry. Structured support is needed for students having no prior PBL experiences to develop their learner agency at both intrapersonal and behavioural (self-regulated learning) dimensions, and to ensure they interact with their learning environment proactively.

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  • 2.
    Alsafi, Z
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Michelotti, A
    Orbach, R
    List, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders/orofacial pain: a comparison between two dental schools in Europe2015In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 161-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The aim was to study achieved competences in temporomandibular disorders (TMD)/orofacial pain (OP) at two universities by comparing student's knowledge and understanding, satisfaction with their education and confidence in their clinical competences of TMD/OP. METHODS: The study was conducted in collaboration between Malmö University, Sweden-which uses problem-based learning-and the University of Naples Federico II, Italy-which uses traditional educational methods. Final-semester dental students responded to a self-report questionnaire regarding their knowledge and understanding, interpretation of cases histories, clinical experience, satisfaction and confidence in clinical examination, management and treatment evaluation. RESULTS: No significant difference was found between the students regarding knowledge and understanding. Eighty-seven per cent of the Malmö students and 96% of the Naples students met the criterion on achieved competence. Malmö students had a higher per cent of correct diagnoses than Naples students in the interpretation of case histories. Overall, Malmö students reported most clinical experience and higher confidence than Naple students. CONCLUSIONS: The main findings were that students from Malmö and Naples were, similar in knowledge and understanding of TMD/OP and in satisfaction with their clinical competences. However, Malmö students perceived more confidence in clinical management of patients with TMD/OP. This may reflect that, besides the theoretical part of the programme, a sufficient level of clinical exposure to patients with TMD/OP is essential to gain competences in TMD/OP

  • 3.
    Bengmark, Daniel
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nilner, Maria
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dentists reflect on their problem-based education and professional satisfaction2012In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 1, p. e137-e145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To determine the way in which Malmö University dental graduates perceive their problem-based dental education and evaluate their professional satisfaction. METHOD: The first five cohorts (graduating in years 1995-1999) of the problem-based curriculum were invited to participate. Of 166 graduates, 77% responded to a questionnaire comprising 20 questions on aspects of their dental education, professional situations and interest in postgraduate education. They were asked to rank their perception of their dental education and satisfaction with their professional situation on a visual analogue scale (VAS) with endpoints ranging from 'Not at all' (1) to 'Very well' (10). For other statements, the markings were made on a Likert scale from 1 (not important/not satisfied) to 5 (very important/very satisfied). There were also open-ended questions. RESULTS: Most respondents perceived their education to prepare them well for a career in dentistry (median score VAS 8), and 90% rated above six on a VAS for their professional satisfaction as dentists. Importance and satisfaction were highly correlated with principles of the curriculum: holistic view, oral health, lifelong learning, integration between theory and clinic, and clinical competence. Forty-five per cent of the graduates noted the problem-based learning approach as the most valuable asset of their education, and 19% cited training in oral surgery as a deficit. Of the respondents, 77% expressed interest in specialist training and 55% in research education

  • 4. Best, Helen A
    et al.
    Eaton, Kenneth A
    Plasschaert, Alphons
    Toh, Chooi Gait
    Grayden, Sharon K
    Senakola, Egita
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Continuing professional development - global perspectives: synopsis of a workshop held during the International Association of Dental Research meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden, 2003. Part 2: regulatory and accreditation systems and evidence for improving the performance of the dental team2005In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is the second in a series of two that report on continuing professional development (CPD). Details of the informants and the methodologies used were reported in the first paper. This paper reports the data and information presented on the topics of regulatory and accrediation systems for CPD and evidence that CPD improves the performance of the oral health team. By June 2003, participation in CPD was mandatory in most of the states of the USA, all Canadian Provinces, the UK and Latvia and was likely to become mandatory in a number of other countries in the near future. A variety of accreditation systems were reported including collecting CPD points, which in some countries were weighted depending on the type of CPD activity, and re-certification examinations. Very few studies for the effectiveness of dental CPD were identified. However, in general it was con-cluded that there is little evidence for the effectiveness of CPD for the oral health team. The main recommendation from this study is that a systematic review of the effectiveness of CPD in improving the performance of the oral health team and patient based outcomes be undertaken. A range of other research questions was also identified including: how can CPD be best matched to clinicians’ needs rather than demands?

  • 5. Best, Helen A
    et al.
    Eaton, Kenneth A
    Plasschaert, Alphons
    Toh, Chooi Gait
    Grayden, Sharon K
    Senakola, Egita
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Continuing professional development-global perspectives: synopsis of a workshop held during the International Association of Dental Research meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden, 2003. Part 1: access, funding and participation patterns2005In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 59-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There appears to have been little previous research interest in continuing professional development* (CPD) of dentists and the oral health team. This paper presents data and information on the following aspects of CPD in 17 countries in Asia, Australasia, Europe and North America: availiability of different types of CPD, its providers, data on uptake of CPD courses and activities, and funding of CPD. The results indicate that lectures and hand-on skills courses were held in all 17 countries but the use of the Internet to deliver CPD was by no means universal. CPD was funded from a variety of sources including universities, governments and commercial companies. However, the only universal source of funding for CPD was dentists themselves. Data on participation were available from only three countries. Research issues based on these results will be listed in a second paper.

  • 6.
    Christersson, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bengmark, Daniel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bengtsson, H.
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    A predictive model for alternative admission to dental education2015In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 251-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To compare academic progress and performance of students admitted through two admission systems and to analyse the predictive power of different components in an alternative admission. SAMPLE AND METHODS: The subjects were students admitted to the dental programme at Malmö University, Sweden. The grade admission group was admitted on grades from secondary school (n = 126) and the alternative admission group via an alternative admission procedure (n = 157). The alternative admission procedure consisted of the following components: problem-solving matrices, spatial capacity tested with folding and tin models, manual dexterity, capacity for empathy and interview. Comparisons were made for academic progress (dropouts from the programme and study rate) and academic performance (examinations failed and outcomes of a comprehensive clinical examination). Spearman correlation was calculated for each component of the alternative admission procedure and academic progress as well as academic performance. Multivariate analyses were also carried out. RESULTS: Compared to the grade admission group, the alternative admission group presented lower rate of dropouts (3% vs. 20%, P < 0.001) and a larger proportion graduated within the expected time (88% vs. 60%, P < 0.01). There was no difference between the groups concerning academic performance. Capacity of empathy was correlated with study rate and outcomes of the clinical examination. The matrices predicted low proportion failed examinations and high students' self-assessments in the clinical examination. Predictive power of folding was limited and so was that of the interview. Manual dexterity was not correlated with academic progress or performance. CONCLUSIONS: Results support further development of admission selection criteria, particularly emphatic capacity that predicts important student academic achievements.

  • 7.
    Davies, Julia R
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Field, James
    University of Cardiff, Cardiff, UK.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Maria-Cristina
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Vital, Sibylle
    Université de Paris, AP-HP, Paris, France.
    Paganelli, Corrado
    University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Akota, Ilze
    Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia.
    Quinn, Barry
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Association of Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland.
    Roger-Leroi, Valerie
    Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Murphy, Denis
    Association of Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland.
    Gerber, Gabor
    Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    ARTICULATE: A European glossary of terms used in oral health professional education2023In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 209-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Erasmus+O-Health-EDU project aims to gain a comprehensive view of oral health professional (OHP) education in Europe, through the development of web-based surveys and online toolkits. A glossary to facilitate a common language through which academic teams could cooperate and communicate more accurately was identified as a key need within the project. The aim of ARTICULATE was thus to create a shared language, with a European focus, for terms and concepts used in the field of OHP education.

    METHODS: The methodology was developed from those published for construction of other glossaries with a circular and iterative process: the creation of content and definitions by a group of experts in OHP education, the testing of "fitness for purpose" of the content, and stakeholder consultation. All creation steps were followed by refinements based on testing results and stakeholder comments. The final glossary was then launched as an online resource including a built-in mechanism for user feedback.

    RESULTS: The scope and structure of the glossary were mapped out at a workshop with 12 dental education experts from 7 European countries. A total of 328 terms were identified, of which 171 were finally included in ARTICULATE. After piloting with a close group of other colleagues, the glossary was opened for external input. Thirty European Deans or Heads of Education assessed the definition of each term as "clear" or "not clear." A total of 86 definitions were described as "clear" by all individuals. Terms deemed unclear by at least one individual were revisited and changes made to 37 of the definitions. In conjunction with the launch of the glossary, a range of stakeholder organisations were informed and asked to participate in an open global consultation by providing feedback online. Since its launch in June 2021, the ARTICULATE website (https://o-health-edu.org/articulate) has had an average of 500 visits/month. To promote community ownership, forms embedded on the ARTICULATE webpage allow users to give feedback and suggest new terms. A standing taskforce will meet regularly to consider amendments and make changes to ensure that the glossary remains a relevant and up-to-date resource over time.

    CONCLUSION: ARTICULATE is a unique, evolving, online glossary of terms relating to OHP education, created as a resource for all interested OHP educators. The glossary is a key output of the O-Health-Edu project, which relies on a comprehensive vision of OHP education to address the future oral health needs of the European population.

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  • 8.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    et al.
    Univ Sheffield, Sheffield, England..
    Field, James
    Cardiff Univ, Cardiff, Wales..
    Vital, Sibylle
    Univ Paris Cite, Paris, France..
    van Harten, Maria
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.;Assoc Dent Educ Europe, Dublin, Ireland..
    Roger-Leroi, Valerie
    Clermont Auvergne Univ, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Maria-Cristina
    Univ Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain..
    Akota, Ilze
    Riga Stradins Univ, Riga, Latvia..
    Murphy, Denis
    Assoc Dent Educ Europe, Dublin, Ireland..
    Paganelli, Corrado
    Univ Brescia, Brescia, Italy..
    Gerber, Gabor
    Semmelweis Egyet, Budapest, Hungary..
    Quinn, Barry
    Assoc Dent Educ Europe, Dublin, Ireland.;Univ Liverpool, Liverpool, England..
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    Clermont Auvergne Univ, Clermont Ferrand, France..
    O-HEALTH-EDU: A viewpoint into the current state of Oral Health Professional education in Europe: Part 1: Programme-level data2024In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Current legislation leaves Oral Health Professional (OHP) education open to wide interpretation and may result in significant variation in educational practice and resultant professional attributes across Europe. Data regarding the current state of OHP education across Europe is limited. The aim of Part 1 of this series is to provide programme-level data for Primary Dental Degree Programmes, Dental Hygiene and Postgraduate Education.Methods: A 91-item questionnaire was developed following the Delphi method. The questionnaire and the Articulate glossary of OHP education terms were developed concurrently to facilitate a common understanding of language. Piloting was performed in multiple stages and included institutions internal and external to the research group. The questionnaire was uploaded online and converted to a data hub, allowing dental schools to control their own data and update the data provided whenever they wish. All ADEE member schools (n = 144) were invited to provide data. Forty questions relating to school details, Primary Dental Degree Programmes, Dental Hygiene and Postgraduate Education were included in this part of the series.Results: Seventy-one institutions from 25 European countries provided data between June 2021 and April 2023, which represents a response rate of 49.3% of ADEE members. Programme-level data for Primary Dental Degree Programmes, Dental Hygiene and Postgraduate Education is presented including programme length, funding, languages and fees, student numbers and demographics, student admission and selection processes and permission to practice after graduation.Conclusion: This series of papers, as far as the authors are aware, are the first attempts to build a comprehensive picture of the current state of OHP education in Europe. A comprehensive view of the state of OHP education in Europe is not yet available but the O-Health-Edu data hub provides a means for all education providers in Europe to contribute data to reach this goal. It is anticipated that the data hub will be updated and built upon over time to continually establish a clearer picture of the state of OHP education in Europe.

  • 9. Dixon, Jonathan
    et al.
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Cristina
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Vital, Sibylle
    Gerber, Gabor
    Paganelli, Corrado
    Akota, Ilze
    Greiveldinger, Alyette
    Murphy, Denis
    Quinn, Barry
    Roger-Leroi, Valerie
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    Field, James
    O-HEALTH-EDU: A scoping review on the reporting of oral health professional education in Europe.2021In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 56-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The variability in oral health professional education is likely to impact on the management of oral health needs across Europe. This scoping review forms the initial part of a larger EU-funded collaborative Erasmus + project, 'O-Health-Edu'. The aim of this scoping review is to investigate how oral health professional education in Europe is reported.

    METHODS: The PRISMA and Arksey & O'Malley methodological frameworks for scoping reviews were used to guide reviewers in answering the research question "How is oral health professional education reported in Europe?". The search strategy encompassed published literature searches, internet searches and further searching of relevant documents from educational organisations, regulators and professional bodies. Once the search strategy was developed, it was sent to key stakeholders for consultation. Sources were reviewed by two authors (JD, JF) and included in the review if they reported on oral health professional education in Europe.

    RESULTS: A total of 508 sources were retrieved from all of the searches. A total of 405 sources were excluded as they did not report on the topic of interest, leaving 103 sources that reported on oral health professional education in Europe. Handsearching the references of published sources lead to a further 41 sources being screened, of which, 15 were included. In total, 33 duplications were removed and the final number of included sources was 85. The average year of publication for the included sources was 2007, with sources most commonly published in journals dedicated to dental education. Surveys represented the most common form of reporting. From the data obtained, four broad themes of reporting were evident: dental education at a programme level, dental education at a discipline level, other oral health professional education, and postgraduate education and continuous professional development.

    CONCLUSION: The reporting of dental and oral health professional education in Europe is limited. Whilst there are many useful documents that provide guidelines on dental education, there is limited knowledge on how education is implemented and delivered. There is a greater need for comprehensive educationally driven programme-level data on oral health professional education across Europe.

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  • 10.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    et al.
    University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    van Harten, Maria
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, Association for Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland.
    Roger-Leroi, Valerie
    Clermont Auvergne University, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Vital, Sibylle
    Université Paris Cite, Paris, France.
    Paganelli, Corrado
    University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Akota, Ilze
    University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Maria Cristina
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Murphy, Denis
    Association for Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland.
    Gerber, Gabor
    Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.
    Quinn, Barry
    Association for Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Field, James
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    O-Health-Edu : A viewpoint into the current state of oral health professional education in Europe: Part 2: Curriculum structure, facilities, staffing and quality assurance2024In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Oral health professional (OHP) education is likely to vary across Europe in accordance with an EU directive that is open to broad interpretation. It is not clear how OHP curricula are structured or delivered across Europe. The objectives of Part 2 of this paper series are: (i) to provide an overview of common practices in curriculum structure, the availability of facilities, staffing (faculty) and quality assurance processes and (ii) to consider how the existing programme structures align to stakeholder guidance documents.

    METHODS: A total of 27 questions from a 91-item questionnaire were used for this manuscript. The questionnaire was developed following the Delphi method to establish consensus from a group of experts. Members of the research team and colleagues from other countries in Europe completed a multi-step piloting process. An online data hub was created to allow the respondents to be data controllers and respond to the questionnaire. ADEE member schools (n = 144) were invited to provide data.

    RESULTS: Totally, 71 institutions from 25 European countries provided data between June 2021 and April 2023, which represents a response rate of 49.3% of ADEE members. Data on curriculum approaches, teaching methods, integration of topics of interest, clinical education, staff-student ratios, access to facilities and new technologies, teaching staff (faculty) and quality assurance processes are presented for Primary Dental Degree Programmes.

    CONCLUSION: To the best of our knowledge, this series of papers are the first attempts to provide a comprehensive overview of OHP education in Europe. Results showed that the majority of European dental programmes are engaged in providing innovative and scientifically grounded education in order to develop quality future OHPs. Nevertheless, significant variability in the delivery of clinical education across the European OHP schools was notable in this dataset. A comprehensive view of the state of OHP education in Europe is not yet available but the O-Health-Edu data hub provides a means for all education providers in Europe to contribute data to reach this goal. It is anticipated that the data hub will be updated and built upon over time to continually establish a clearer picture of the state of OHP education in Europe.

  • 11. Eriksen, Harald M
    et al.
    Dimitrov, Vladimir
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Petersson, Kerstin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Svensäter, Gunnel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The oral ecosystem: implications for education2006In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 192-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a model that is applicable to oral health education. The model describes the oral cavity in a complexity-based ecological context. This concept includes the premise that factors from different organisational levels (biological, individual, community, society) interact in a complex way with the potential to 'stress' the ecosystem and thereby provoke changes. This mode of action complies with the understanding of the oral cavity as a complex adaptive system. An ecological model is actively used in the undergraduate problem-based curriculum at the Faculty of Odontology, Malmo University, Sweden and has recently been applied as a conceptual basis for the new dental curriculum being established at the University of Tromso in Northern Norway. The purpose is to encourage and promote an ecological, health-oriented view and to stimulate reflections on premises for oral health and diseases in an integrated context.

  • 12.
    Field, James
    et al.
    Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Quinn, Barry
    University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK.
    Murphy, Denis
    Association for Dental Education in Europe, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vital, Sibylle
    Universite Paris Cite, Paris, France.
    Paganelli, Corrado
    University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy.
    Akota, Ilze
    Riga Stradins University, Riga, Latvia.
    Gerber, Gabor
    Semmelweis Egyetem, Budapest, Hungary.
    Roger-Leroi, Valerie
    University of Clermont-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Maria Cristina
    Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    University of Clermont-Auvergne, Clermont-Ferrand, France.
    O-Health-Edu: A vision for oral health professional education in Europe.2023In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 382-387Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This consensus paper reports on the process of developing a renewed vision for Oral Health Professional (OHP) education across Europe, and forms part of a larger EU-funded collaborative Erasmus+ project, "O-Health-Edu." The vision aligns with the World Health Organisation milestones (2016) and resolutions (2021), and EU4Health programme (2020) objectives - and projects 20 years into the future, to 2040. This longitudinal vision takes a multi-stakeholder perspective to deliver OHP education that acts in the best interests of both students and patients, and sits within the context of a wider strategy for general health. Included, it is an infographic to help communicate the vision to various stakeholders of OHP education.

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  • 13. Field, James
    et al.
    Kavadella, Agyro
    Szep, Susanne
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    DeLap, Ellis
    Manzanares-Cespedes, Maria Cristina
    The Graduating European Dentist: Domain III: Patient- Centred Care2017In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 21, no Supplement 1, p. 18-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper outlines the areas of competence and learning outcomes of “The Graduating European Dentist” that specifically relate to patient- centred care. This ap-proach is becoming increasingly prominent within the literature and within policy documents. Whilst working to an evidence base is critical, dentists must also be aware of the scientific basis that underpins the treatment they provide. The evaluation pro-cess, which supports treatment planning, also requires dentists to be able to listen, collate, and record pertinent information effectively. In addition, the ability to account for a patient’s social, cultural and linguistic needs (cultural competence) will result in a practitioner who is able to treatment plan for patient- centred care.

  • 14.
    Field, James
    et al.
    Cardiff University Dental School, Cardiff, UK.
    Martin, Nicolas
    The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Duane, Brett
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Vital, Sibylle
    Universite Paris Cite, Paris, France.
    Mulligan, Steven
    The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Livny, Alon
    Hadassah School of Dental Medicine, Hebrew University, Jersualem, Israel.
    Lindberg, Pia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lundegren, Nina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gummesson, Christina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Long, Ruby
    Cardiff University Dental School, Cardiff, UK.
    Lundbeck, Heather
    Cardiff University Dental School, Cardiff, UK.
    Ramasubbu, Darshini
    Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.
    Embedding environmental sustainability within oral health professional curricula-Recommendations for teaching and assessment of learning outcomes.2023In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 650-661Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The FDI World Dental Federation suggests that "dentistry, as a profession, should integrate Sustainable Development Goals into daily practice and support a shift to a green economy in the pursuit of healthy lives and wellbeing for all, through all stages of life." This article reports on the recent activity of the Association for Dental Education in Europe Special Interest Group for Sustainability in Dentistry. Following on from the group's previous activities, which explored current educational practice, this work aimed to reach a pan-European consensus on a number of learning outcomes for environmental sustainability, in order to (i) support institutions in designing and delivering their curriculum, and (ii) to further harmonise the delivery of oral health professional education across Europe. This article presents specific learning outcomes relating to environmental sustainability and recommendations relating to curriculum development, including methods of teaching and assessment.

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  • 15.
    Franzén, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The undergraduate degree project: preparing dental students for professional work and postgraduate studies?2014In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 207-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Objectives: The undergraduate degree project is a requisite part of higher education in Sweden, designed to prepare students for professional work and postgraduate studies. This article examines the extent to which the degree project in Swedish dental education helps students achieve these purposes. The focus was on the students’ choice of topics and research methods as well as their ability to reflect on the implications of their results for dental practice. Methods: Degree projects from three of the four Swedish dental schools were analysed using content analysis. Results: The students’ topics concerned clinical dentistry, biomedicine, educational issues and public oral health. Quantitative research methods were used more often than qualitative ones. Some of the degree projects were based on literature reviews. Students demonstrated shortcomings in their reflections on the implications of their results for dental practice. The level of reflection was particularly low in one of the schools; this may be because the students in this school were not expected to reflect on the results. Conclusions: The degree project gives the students an opportunity to develop their knowledge on a topic relevant to dentistry, to be trained in conducting research and to reflect on scientific knowledge in relation to dentistry. However, this study shows the need of assessment criteria that urge the students to reflect on the link between science and clinical work and motivate them to learn to reflect so they become critical thinkers. It is also suggested that dental students should learn more about qualitative research methods.

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  • 16.
    Franzén, Cecilia
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Brown, George
    Undergraduate degree projects in the Swedish dental schools: a documentary analysis2013In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 122-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Undergraduate degree projects have currently been introduced into courses in the four Swedish dental schools. The rationale for research projects is that they enable students to develop research expertise skills and to show their ability to apply and develop knowledge relevant to professional practice. This paper reports a qualitative analysis of the curriculum documents and handbooks including the criteria used to assess the students’ research reports. The aim was to investigate commonalities and differences in the design of degree projects between the four Swedish dental schools and to explore any inconsistencies within the documents. Methods: The documentary analysis was based on the constant comparison method. Results: Four overarching themes emerged from the analysis: (1) developing scientific expertise, (2) developing professional expertise, (3) following rules and (4) fostering creativity. Conclusions: The documents from the four dental schools revealed similar views on the purposes of the projects and provided similar assessment criteria. The students were requested to formulate an odontological problem, apply a relevant scientific method, analyse texts and empirical data, express critical reflections and write a short thesis. The students were free to choose topics. There were differences between the dental schools on the emphasis placed on practical uses of the projects and theoretical background of the projects. Two of the schools insisted on rigid rules of completing and writing the project yet paradoxically emphasised creativity. There were wide variations in the required length of the project report. The report may prove useful to dental schools in other countries who are about to design undergraduate research projects.

  • 17.
    Haghparast, Hajdir
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ghorbani, Amir
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Dental students' perception of their approaches to learning in a PBL programme2017In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 159-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To compare dental students' perceptions of their learning approaches between different years of a problem-based learning (PBL) programme. The hypothesis was that in a comparison between senior and junior students, the senior students would perceive themselves as having a higher level of deep learning approach and a lower level of surface learning approach than junior students would. This hypothesis was based on the fact that senior students have longer experience of a student-centred educational context, which is supposed to underpin student learning. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Students of three cohorts (first year, third year and fifth year) of a PBL-based dental programme were asked to respond to a questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) developed to analyse students' learning approaches, that is deep approach and surface approach, using four subscales including deep strategy, surface strategy, deep motive and surface motive. The results of the three cohorts were compared using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). A P-value was set at <0.05 for statistical significance. RESULTS: The fifth-year students demonstrated a lower surface approach than the first-year students (P = 0.020). There was a significant decrease in surface strategy from the first to the fifth year (P = 0.003). No differences were found concerning deep approach or its subscales (deep strategy and deep motive) between the mean scores of the three cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: The results did not show the expected increased depth in learning approaches over the programme years.

  • 18. Haghparast, Nora
    et al.
    Sedghizadeh, Parish P
    Schuler, Charles F
    Ferati, D
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Evaluation of student and faculty perceptions of the PBL curriculum at two dental schools from a student perspective: a cross-sectional survey2007In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 14-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Problem-based learning (PBL) research has primarily highlighted issues related to medical education and less evaluation has been reported from the field of dental education. Furthermore, literature reports tend to focus mainly on PBL from a pedagogic and curriculum constructional view and up to this date, studies from a student perspective are lacking. The aim of this study was to approach the evaluation of student and staff perceptions of PBL curricula from a student perspective at two separate schools: the Faculty of Odontology at the University of Malmö, Sweden and the dental school of the University of Southern California, School of Dentistry (USCSD), Los Angeles, CA, USA. The study was initiated and conducted by two of the authors, at the time senior students at the Faculty of Odontology in Malmö, Sweden. The study was comprised of a literature search, a 2 week field trip to USCSD, USA, survey distribution to students and faculty in both schools, analysis of the data and a written report for oral defence. The results from the survey were intended to provide feedback on student and faculty perceptions regarding the PBL curriculum. The results indicate a general student and faculty satisfaction with the PBL curriculum. Perhaps, surprisingly their perceptions did not differ significantly despite differences in geography, culture and implementation of PBL pedagogy.

  • 19.
    Hänsel Petersson, Gunnel
    et al.
    Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Carlsson, P.
    Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Bratthall, D.
    Department of Cariology, Faculty of Odontology, Lund University, Sweden.
    Caries risk assessment: a comparison between the computer program ‘Cariogram’, dental students and dental instructors1998In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 184-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An interactive educational PC-program for caries risk evaluation, the ‘Cariogram’, was developed. It illustrates the interaction between caries related factors and expresses the caries risk graphically. It also expresses a weighted impact of different aetiological factors on the risk. The aim of this paper was to use the Cariogram program on a set of patients, and to compare the outcome of its risk evaluation with those made by dental students and faculty teachers. A questionnaire was given to the participants, containing descriptions of 5 patients with detailed information on 9 factors generally associated with caries. The participants were asked to rank the patients according to their ‘chance to avoid dental caries’ during the coming year. The results were compared with the assessments obtained from the Cariogram and the similarity calculated by group average cluster analysis. Results: 86% of the respondents ranked the patients for caries risk either identical or with only 1 deviation compared to the program. No difference was seen between students and teachers. The cluster analysis identified 5 distinct patterns of ranking the patients with a maximum distance of 0.6 compared to the program. It was concluded that the ‘opinion’ on caries risk of the Cariogram was in agreement with that of the majority of the responders. In addition, the use of the program induced discussions about the relative impact of caries aetiological factors, and it is believed that the Cariogram can serve as one further option in the teaching of caries risk.  

  • 20. James, Field
    et al.
    Walmsley, Damien
    Paganelli, Corrado
    McLoughlin, Jacinta
    Szep, Susanne
    Kavadella, Agyro
    Manzanares Cespedes, Maria Cristina
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    DeLap, Ellis
    Levy, Gerard
    Gallagher, Jennifer
    Roger-Leroi, Valérie
    The Graduating European Dentist: Contemporaneous Methods of Teaching, Learning and Assessment in Dental Undergraduate Education2017In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 21, no Supplement 1, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is often the case that good teachers just “intuitively” know how to teach. Whilst that may be true, there is now a greater need to understand the various processes that underpin both the ways in which a curriculum is delivered, and the way in which the students engage with learning; curricula need to be designed to meet the changing needs of our new graduates, providing new, and robust learning opportunities, and be communicated effectively to both staff and students. The aim of this document is to draw together robust and contemporaneous methods of teaching, learning and as- sessment that help to overcome some of the more traditional barriers within dental undergraduate programmes. The methods have been chosen to map specifically to The Graduating European Dentist, and should be considered in parallel with the benchmarking process that educators and institutions employ locally.

  • 21.
    Koch, Margaretha
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Englander, Magnus
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Tegelberg, Åke
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wolf, Eva
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Successful clinical and organisational change in endodontic practice: a qualitative study2014In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 121-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explicate and describe the qualitative meaning of successful clinical and organizational change in endodontic practice, following a comprehensive implementation program, including the integration of the nickel-titanium-rotary-technique. After an educational intervention in the Public Dental Service in a Swedish county, thematic in-depth interviews were conducted, with special reference to the participants' experience of the successful change. Interviews with four participants, were purposively selected on the basis of occupation (dentist, dental assistant, receptionist, clinical manager), for a phenomenological human scientific analysis. Four constituents were identified as necessary for the invariant, general structure of the phenomenon: 1) disclosed motivation, 2) allowance for individual learning processes, 3) continuous professional collaboration, and 4) a facilitating educator. The perceived requirements for achieving successful clinical and organizational change in endodontic practice were clinical relevance, an atmosphere which facilitated discussion and allowance for individual learning patterns. The qualities required in the educator were acknowledged competence with respect to scientific knowledge and clinical expertise, as well as familiarity with conditions at the dental clinics. The results indicate a complex interelationship among various aspects of the successful change process.

  • 22. Koole, S.
    et al.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Contemporary undergraduate implant dentistry education: a systematic review2014In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 18, no S1, p. 12-23Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Consensus reports recommend that students upon graduation should possess a significant level of knowledge and competence in implant dentistry, including basic competences in diagnostics, treatment planning, restorative, straightforward surgical and maintenance procedures. In response, undergraduate curricula need to integrate implant dentistry. This narrative review explores educational programmes in terms of competences, related research and barriers or reflections, regarding implementation in undergraduate curricula. Materials and methods: Publications (2008-2013) were searched systematically in WoS, PubMed and ERIC and screened independently by two authors in four stages: removal of duplicates, title screening, abstract screening and full-text reading. Inclusion criteria encompassed implant dentistry in undergraduate education. Results: Finally, 37 of 420 papers were included. Detailed information regarding programme content, number of participants, staff input, logistics/funding issues is scattered. Theoretical education is predominant, and pre-clinical/clinical training is offered minimally, often carried out in elective programmes. However, selected straightforward cases treated by undergraduates yield positive outcomes with low failure rates, few complications, high patient satisfaction and student appreciation. Barriers to implementing implant dentistry in the undergraduate curriculum include funding issues, limitations in time or staff availability/competence and lack of suitable patients. Overcoming these barriers is worthwhile as experience-based implant education affects future practice as well-informed students propose more restorative alternatives to their patients. Conclusion: Although implant dentistry is increasingly integrated in undergraduate curricula, challenges remain in developing strategies to implement existing competence profiles and the extent of experience-based education. To support further advancement, universities should report comprehensively on their implant programmes to allow comparison and reproduction in other environments.

  • 23. Koole, S
    et al.
    De Wever, B
    Aper, L
    Vervaeke, S
    Derese, A
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Using Online Periodontal Case-Based Discussions to Synchronize Theoretical and Clinical Undergraduate Dental Education2012In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 52-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Clinical experience is important in undergraduate dental education, but (suitable) patients to learn from are often lacking. Online case-based discussions were introduced to overcome patient dependency and to synchronize theoretical with clinical education. Materials and methods: Undergraduate dental students in groups of 5-7 discussed online clinical case reports presenting either minor (2nd year) or complex periodontal pathology (3rd year). Each case consisted of a brief patient history, extra-and intraoral clinical pictures, periodontal chart, peri-apical and/ or orthopantomographic radiographs. Students had to discuss diagnosis and treatment planning. Questionnaires assessed students' and supervisors' general appreciation (score on 20), time investment and opinions about organisation, relation case/course content, future planning, learning effect and online environment (5-point Likert scale). A crossover design with three tests (pre-test, test in between and post-test) was used to investigate whether the frequency of case introduction (one case per week vs. one case element per week) had an effect on learning. Data was analysed with descriptive statistics (questionnaires) and repeated measures ANOVA (crossover design). Results: Students (n = 119) and supervisors (n = 9) highly appreciated the exercise. Students reported spending on average 74 min per week to read a case, prepare and post messages. Supervisors' total time investment was 342 min per semester to create a case, provide online feedback and to prepare a live-discussion. No significant differences in test-scores were found between the two modalities of case introduction. Conclusion: Online case-based discussions, in conjunction with a theoretical course, are valuable additions to the dental curriculum, especially to reinforce the transition from theory to clinical practice.

  • 24. Koole, S.
    et al.
    Vandeweghe, Stefan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Mattheos, N.
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Implant dentistry education in Europe: 5 years after the Association for Dental Education in Europe consensus report2014In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 18, no S1, p. 43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: To promote consensus on implant dentistry university education in Europe, a workshop amongst university teachers and opinion leaders was organised in 2008. As a result, guidelines on both under-and postgraduate education were issued. This study aims to investigate the current status of university teaching of implant dentistry and the impact of the recommendations for teaching and assessment, 5 years after the first consensus. Finally, this report attempts to identify future directions in education within the discipline. Materials and methods: An online survey was distributed amongst 105 academic leaders in implant education in Europe, and 52 questionnaires were returned (response rate 50%). Results: The average amount of implant dentistry in undergraduate curricula has increased to 74 h, compared to 36 h in 2008, and the inclusion of pre-clinical and clinical education has increased. No change occurred with regard to the aimed competence levels. It was suggested that certain implant procedures including surgery should be provided by dentists after attending additional courses, whilst complex treatments will still require specialist training. The 2008 workshop guidelines have been implemented to a varying extent (25-100%) in under-and postgraduate education. Main reported implementation barriers included limited time availability in the curriculum and limited financial/material resources. Future discussions about implant dentistry in Europe should be focused towards integration in current dental curricula, approaches to overcome barriers and the relations with and role of industrial partners. Conclusion: Implant dentistry is increasingly integrating in undergraduate dental education. Development of the consensus guidelines in 2008 may have facilitated this process. Nevertheless, further progress is needed on all educational levels to align training of professionals to the growing treatment needs of the population.

  • 25. Koole, Sebastiaan
    et al.
    Fine, Peter
    De Bruyn, Hugo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Periodontology and Oral Implantology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dental School, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Using discussion groups as a strategy for postgraduate implant dentistry students to reflect2016In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 59-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction More than undergraduates, postgraduate students have the day-to-day clinical experience to reflect upon. Nevertheless, reflection in postgraduate dental education is less well studied. Hence, the purpose was to investigate the attitude towards reflection and the content of reflections in postgraduate implant dentistry education in the UK and Belgium. Materials and Methods To investigate the attitude towards reflection, a questionnaire was administered to the 10 postgraduates at UCL Eastman Dental Institute (EDI) and 6 postgraduates at Ghent University (UGent). Additionally, students were invited to attend two reflective sessions (60-90minutes). The sessions' audio recordings were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach Results In total, 16 postgraduate implant dentistry students participated. Although the majority reported prior experience with reflection, there was variation in the provided definitions of reflection. EDI students agreed with reflection being beneficial for professional development/clinical reasoning and were positive about discussing clinical experiences in groups, but were divided about individual/group reflections. Their UGent counterparts were more indecisive (=neutral), but were positive about discussing clinical experiences. Thematic analysis identified recurring themes as individual learning process, learning and clinical experiences, attitude towards implant dentistry and course programme. EDI postgraduates' reflections focussed on specific clinical situations, while UGent postgraduates' reflections described general considerations Conclusion Although students/professionals often report to reflect, it is not clear whether/how they actually reflect, due to the all-purpose word reflection has become. A strategy, using group discussions along with supervision/guidance in how to reflect, demonstrated to expand clinical reasoning into reflections about postgraduate students' clinical actions and professional growth

  • 26.
    Kozarovska, Annika
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Larsson, Christel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Implementation of a digital preparation validation tool in dental skills laboratory training2018In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 115-121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the implementation of a digital tool for preparation validation and evaluate it as an aid in students' self-assessment. METHODS: Students at the final semester of skills laboratory training were asked to use a digital preparation validation tool (PVT) when performing two different tasks; preparation of crowns for teeth 11 and 21. The students were divided into two groups. Group A self-assessed and scanned all three attempts at 21 ("prep-and-scan"). Group B self-assessed all attempts chose the best one and scanned it ("best-of-three"). The situation was reversed for 11. The students assessed five parameters of the preparation and marked them as approved (A) or failed (F). These marks were compared with the information from the PVT. The students also completed a questionnaire. Each question was rated from 1 to 5. Teachers' opinions were collected at staff meetings throughout the project. RESULTS: Most students in the "prep-and-scan" groups showed an increase in agreement between their self-assessment and the information from the PVT, whereas students in the "best-of-three" groups showed lower levels of agreement. All students rated the PVT positively. Most strongly agreed that the tool was helpful in developing skills (mean 4.15), easy to use (mean 4.23) and that it added benefits in comparison to existing assessment tools (mean 4.05). They did not however, fully agree that the tool is time efficient (mean 2.55), and they did not consider it a substitute for verbal teacher feedback. Teachers' feedback suggested advantages of the tool in the form of ease of use, visual aid and increasing interest and motivation during skills laboratory training however, they did not notice a reduction in need of verbal feedback. CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of the study, our conclusion is that a digital PVT may be a valuable adjunct to other assessment tools in skills laboratory training.

  • 27.
    Kozarovska, Annika
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Larsson, Christel
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Implementation of a preparation validation tool in skills lab.2015In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 22, no 1, p. e156-e157Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Self-assessment ability is a crucial skill for any professional. Training self-assessment leads to improved capabilities and should be performed continuously during the dental education. Using different tools for self-assessment creates variation and improves motivation to continue training. The aim of the present study was to implement a newly developed tool for preparation validation in skills lab training and evaluate students’ as well as teachers’ experiences using a questionnaire. Materials and Methods: The Faculty of Odontology in Malmö works with a problem based approach towards learning and strongly encourages self-assessment in the learning situation. The Prep Validation program from the KaVo Dental Teacher system is a newly introduced program with multiple applications – one being the possibility to be used for self-assessment. When students do skills lab training they can use the instrument to scan their own preparation and then compare it to the unprepared tooth as well as the teacher´s master preparation. The visual image provides an immediate feedback which is easy to interpret. Students can assess their preparation in comparison with the master preparation and make adjustments accordingly. The program was used for two different preparation types in the prosthetic rehabilitation skills lab training of dental students (n=59). They were asked to answer a questionnaire afterwards. The questionnaire consisted of four questions concerning whether the tool helped in developing skills, whether it reduced time to reach the required standard of preparation, whether it was easy to use and if it provided added benefits in comparison to existing self-assessment tools (forms used for self- and peer-assessment) and teacher feedback respectively. Results: The results are currently being processed. Preliminary interpretation suggests that students’ experiences are divided where some consider the Prep Validation program a valuable tool and others do not. The first group appreciates the immediate visual feedback, easy unbiased interpretation and considers the tool to be simple to use, reduce the total time needed for them to reach the required standard of preparation and reduce the need for teacher feedback. The other group of students does not regard the tool to provide added benefits in comparison to existing self-assessment tools and teacher feedback. Conclusions: A preliminary conclusion is that some students appreciate the visual aids of the program whereas others manage well without it. Different students favor different tools to use for self-assessment to help their skills lab training.

  • 28. Kragelund, Camilla
    et al.
    Reibel, Jesper
    Hietanen, Jarkko
    Hadler-Olsen, Elin
    Johannessen, Anne Christine
    Kenrad, Birgit
    Nylander, Karin
    Puranen, Mirja
    Salo, Tuula
    Syrjänen, Stina
    Søland, Tine M.
    van der Waal, Isaäc
    van der Wal, Jacqueline E.
    Warfvinge, Gunnar
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Scandinavian fellowship for oral pathology and oral medicine: guidelines for oral pathology and oral medicine in the dental curriculum2012In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 246-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Scandinavia, as in many European countries, most patients consult their general dentist once a year or more. This gives the dentist a unique opportunity and an obligation to make an early diagnosis of oral diseases, which is beneficial for both the patient and the society. Thus, the dentist must have knowledge of clinical symptoms, local and systemic signs and clinical differential diagnoses to make an accurate diagnosis. The dentist must be competent in selecting appropriate diagnostic tests, for example, tissue biopsy and microbiological samples, and conducting them correctly, as well as in interpreting test results and taking appropriate action accordingly. Furthermore, the dentist must be aware of diseases demanding multidisciplinary cooperation and be able to recognise his/her professional limitation, and to refer to other specialists when required. The dental curriculum changes over time as new approaches, treatments and diagnostic possibilities develop. Likewise, the role of the dentist in the community changes and may vary in different countries. As members of the Scandinavian Fellowship for Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine and subject representatives of oral pathology and oral medicine, we feel obliged to contribute to the discussion of how the guidelines of the dental curriculum support the highest possible standards of dental education. This article is meant to delineate a reasonable standard of oral pathology and oral medicine in the European dental curriculum and to guide subject representatives in curriculum development and planning. We have created an advisory topic list in oral pathology and oral medicine.

  • 29.
    Leisnert, Leif
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Karlsson, Maja
    Franklin, Inger
    Lindh, Liselott
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wretlind, Katarina
    Improving teamwork between students from two professional programmes in dental education2012In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 17-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, the National Board of Health and Welfare forecasts a decrease in dentists with 26% and an increase in dental hygienists with 47% until the year of 2023. This, together with changes in both epidemiology, especially of dental caries, and political priorities, calls for an effective and well-developed cooperation between dentists and dental hygienists in future dentistry. Hence, the aim of this project was to investigate whether highlighting teamwork during the undergraduate studies of dental students and dental hygiene students could improve the students' holistic view on patients as well as their knowledge of and insight into each other's future professions. Thirty-four dental students and 24 dental hygiene students participated in the study. At the beginning of their final year in undergraduate education, a questionnaire testing the level of knowledge of the dental hygienists' clinical competences was completed by both groups of students. In addition, activities intending to improve teamwork quality included the following: (i) a seminar with a dentist representing the Public Dental Health Services in Sweden, (ii) dental students as supervisors for dental hygiene students, (iii) planning and treatment for shared patients and (iv) students' presentations of the treatments and their outcomes at a final seminar. The project was ended by the students answering the above-mentioned questionnaire for the second time, followed by an evaluation of the different activities included in the study. The knowledge of dental hygienists' competences showed higher scores in almost all questions. Both groups of students considered the following aspects important: seminars with external participants, dental students acting as supervisors and planning and treating shared patients. By initiating and encouraging teamwork between dental students and dental hygiene students, it is possible to increase knowledge on dental hygienists' competence and also to develop and strengthen a holistic view on patients and dental work, thereby preparing both groups of students for their professional life.

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  • 30.
    Leisnert, Leif
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Redmo Emanuelsson, Ing Mari
    Papia, Evaggelia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Evaluation of an outreach education model over five years: Perception of dental students and their outreach clinical mentors2017In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The objective was to investigate changes in students' and clinical mentors' perceptions of a model for outreach education over a 5-year period, 2006-2010. MATERIAL AND METHOD: Two cohorts of last-year students of a dental problem-based curriculum and their clinical mentors in the Public Dental Service (PDS) were invited to respond to a questionnaire. In 2006, 85% of 54 students and 72% of their 54 mentors responded; 98% of 40 students and 88% of 41 of the mentors did so in 2010. Participants scored their level of agreement with different statements on a numeric rating scale and gave comments. RESULTS: Dental students and their clinical mentors reported that they shared a consistent and favourable perception of this outreach education model over 5 years. The students reported increased professional confidence and self-reliance. Clinical mentors expressed a transfer of knowledge to their clinics. Differences in scoring were seen between students and mentors for two statements in 2006 and two statements in 2010 (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The current model for outreach education received favourable and stable ratings over the 5-year period. This model resulted in that students perceived that they became self-reliant, which may facilitate their transition from being a student to becoming a professional. The current model supports exchange and professional development for students, faculty and outreach clinics. This leads us to look at outreach education as an opportunity to form a mutual learning community comprised of the outreach clinics and the dental school.

  • 31.
    Lindh, Christina
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lindberg, Pia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Rohlin, Madeleine
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Specialist Training at the Faculty of Odontology, Malmö University2006In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 10, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim To describe the specialist training at the Faculty of Odontology in Malmö for eight specialities that are certified in Sweden and report the results of a questionnaire among former specialist trainees. Material and Method The objectives of the specialist training are set on three levels: the national level according to the Swedish National Board for Health and Welfare, the faculty level, the so called Malmö model, and finally the specialist subject level. The specialist training in Malmö is implemented in collaboration with the Public Dental Health Care in southern Sweden. The Postgraduate Education Board of the faculty scrutinizes and approves each trainee’s individualized specialist training programme. The clinical part of the training is to be shared between the collaborating units and the theoretical part is the prime responsibility of the faculty. During the three-year-programme, seven core courses are held for all trainees irrespective of specialist subject parallel to the clinical training. Every semester there are two joint seminars: one seminar on a current odontological theme and one on the following subjects; epidemiology, ethics, migration and ethnic relations, environment, gender, leadership. A written and oral programme evaluation is performed yearly by the Chair of the Postgraduate Education Board together with a representative of the Public Dental Health Care. As part of the 2003 evaluation a questionnaire was sent to 31 specialist graduates trained between 2000 and 2003. Twenty-four specialists responded, 13 graduates from Malmö and 11 from other Swedish specialist institutions. Results and Conclusion A majority of the 24 responding graduates express that the work as specialists suit them very well and that the education well serve the purpose to work as a specialist. A majority of the graduates from Malmö were positive to the joint courses during their training. Some thought that there should be more joint activities among trainees of different subject specialities.

  • 32.
    Lucander, Henriette
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, School of Technology (TS).
    Bondemark, Lars
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Brown, George
    Knutsson, Kerstin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The structure of observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy: a model to promote dental students’ learning2010In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 145-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selective memorising of isolated facts or reproducing what is thought to be required – the surface approach to learning – is not the desired outcome for a dental student or a dentist in practice. The preferred outcome is a deep approach as defined by an intention to seek understanding, develop expertise and relate information and knowledge into a coherent whole. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the structure of observed learning outcome (SOLO) taxonomy could be used as a model to assist and promote the dental students to develop a deep approach to learning assessed as learning outcomes in a summative assessment. Thirty-two students, participating in course eight in 2007 at the Faculty of Odontology at Malmo¨ University, were introduced to the SOLO taxonomy and constituted the test group. The control group consisted of 35 students participating in course eight in 2006. The effect of the introduction was measured by evaluating responses to a question in the summative assessment by using the SOLO taxonomy. The evaluators consisted of two teachers who performed the assessment of learning outcomes independently and separately on the coded material. The SOLO taxonomy as a model for learning was found to improve the quality of learning. Compared to the control group significantly more strings and structured relations between these strings were present in the test group after the SOLO taxonomy had been introduced (P < 0.01, one tailed test for both results). The SOLO taxonomy is recommended as a model for promoting and developing a deeper approach to learning in dentistry.

  • 33.
    Lundegren, Nina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jönsson, Anders
    Faculty of Education, University of Kristianstad, Kristianstad, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Pia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    An upgrade of the Malmö model by implementing case-based teaching and learning, in an undergraduate dental curriculum.2021In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 649-656Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: At our dental education, the examination failure rate among students has increased, resulting in subsequent involuntary dropouts. One of the main problems seems to be that the students struggle with taking the necessary responsibility for their learning, as required by the problem-based learning (PBL) methodology.

    AIM: To describe the background to, and the transition process from, pure PBL to case-based teaching and learning (CBT) with flipped classroom seminars at the dental program at [anonymised for peer review].

    METHODS: In this position paper we describe our observed problems with the PBL methodology, as implemented at this faculty, and the potential benefits of a change towards CBT. The current implementation of CBT is presented, along with educational research supporting the choice of activities.

    RESULTS: Tentative findings are that the flipped classroom seminars and the clearer instructions appear to be successful with higher levels of activity, engagement and attendance among the students, and the students has evaluated the seminars as very good learning activities.

    CONCLUSION: Tentative findings suggest that the current implementation of CBT may be a fruitful way of teaching in dental education today. Most of the teaching staff have been reawakened to teaching, and as a result, the content of the courses are being reviewed and improved. The students appreciate that what is expected of them has been made clearer and that there is a variety of learning activities.

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  • 34.
    Lundegren, Nina
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lindberg, Pia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Gummesson, Christina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Experiences of the use of portfolio in dental education - A qualitative meta-ethnographic literature review2024In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Portfolio with a collection of evidence has become popular in higher education, including dental education. It is valuable to study the experiences of the use and implementation processes. Meta-ethnography can be a suitable method to analyse, synthesize and construct interpretations of qualitative research. Our aim was to explore experiences from the use of a portfolio/e-portfolio in dental education, from the students' and teachers' perspectives.

    Materials and methods: A systematic search in the databases PubMed, Scopus and ERC was performed, and the established seven steps of a meta-ethnographic review were used. 278 papers were initially identified, and seven were included in the final analysis.

    Results: Two themes (Issues to Address and Consequences) and five subthemes (Purpose, Roles, Support and Structure, Challenges and Enablers, and Gains) were constructed.

    Discussion: Our synthesis reflects various challenges, yet the learning gains are recognized and expressed to be important once the students and teachers have overcome early thresholds. Beyond the conclusions drawn in each paper, our synthesis provides new perspectives on the complexity of an implementation process and the balance of not seeing the woods for the trees being overwhelmed by technical and other practical aspects, reducing the opportunity for learning.

    Conclusion: The portfolio implementation in undergraduate dental education should address clarification to all stakeholders of the purpose and role, presenting a purposeful portfolio structure and timely support.

  • 35. Manogue, Michael
    et al.
    McLoughlin, Jancinta
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Delap, Elis
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Schoonheim-Klein, Meta
    Plasschaert, Alfons
    Curriculum structure, content, learning and assessment in European undergraduate dental education - update 20102011In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract This paper presents an updated statement on behalf of the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) in relation to proposals for undergraduate Curriculum Structure, Content, Learning, Assessment and Student / Staff Exchange for dental education in Europe. A task force was constituted to consider these issues and the two previous, related publications produced by the Association (Plasschaert et al 2006 and 2007) were revised. The broad European dental community was circulated and contributed to the revisions. The paper was approved at the General Assembly of ADEE, held in Amsterdam in August 2010 and will be updated again in 2015.

  • 36. Mattheos, N.
    et al.
    de Bruyn, H.
    Hultin, M.
    Jepsen, S.
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Koole, S.
    Sanz, M.
    Ucer, C.
    Lang, N. P.
    Developing implant dentistry education in Europe: the continuum from undergraduate to postgraduate education and continuing professional development2014In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 18, no S1, p. 4-10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Implant dentistry is a treatment modality which has mainstream clinical practice of comprehensive care, which however is not adequately represented in the undergraduate dental curricula. A consensus workshop organised by ADEE in 2008, set the benchmarks for the knowledge and competences a modern dental practitioner must possess with regard to implant dentistry, as well as defined undergraduate and postgraduate pathways for the acquisition of these competences. Today, 5 years later, there exist several challenges for the implementation of these benchmarks in both undergraduate curricula but also post-graduation educational pathways. Methods: A consensus workshop was organised by ADEE, bringing together 48 opinion leaders, including academic teachers of all disciplines related to implant dentistry, specialists, representatives of relevant scientific and professional associations, as well as industry delegates. The objectives of the workshop were to evaluate the existing scientific literature, reported experience and best practices in order to identify potential and limitations for the implementation of implant dentistry in the undergraduate curriculum, as well produce recommendations for the optimal educational structures for postgraduate programmes and continuing professional development. Results: The scientific committee conducted two European-wide questionnaire surveys to better document the current state of education in implant dentistry. Upon completion of the surveys, reviewers were appointed to produce three scientific review papers, identifying current achievements and future challenges. Finally, during the 3 days of the workshop, all the evidence was reviewed and the main conclusions and recommendations that were adopted by all participants are reported in the present Consensus Paper. Conclusions: Implementation of implant dentistry in the undergraduate curriculum has improved significantly, but still lags behind the benchmarks set in 2008 and the diversity between institutions remains big. At the post-graduation level, there is currently a wide diversity of courses and pathways towards competences related to implant dentistry and there is at present a great need for quality assurance, as well as standardisation and transparency of the learning outcomes.

  • 37.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Högström, Mats
    Hallstedt, Per-Axel
    Malmberg, Claes
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Nature-Environment-Society (NMS).
    Hartsmar, Nanny
    Malmö högskola, School of Teacher Education (LUT), Nature-Environment-Society (NMS).
    Multidisciplinary development of professional identity through a Problem Based Learning Curriculum2008In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 122-123Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Healthcare practitioners operate in an increasingly complex social environment, where daily professional practice requires dealing with problems of social, moral, ethical and legal dimensions. This crucial aspect of "professionalism" is often neglected in the dental curriculum. The aim of this pedagogic project is to use self and peer-assessment to help students develop their professional identity. Through the use of authentic situations , the project aims to confront students with controversial scenarios from professional life and consequently help them define well informed strategies. Materials and Methods: This project is a collaboration between the Faculty of Odontology, the School of Social Sciences and the School of Education, University of Malmo¨, Sweden. All three disciplines have with the help of students developed "cases" based on authentic scenarios. These cases include controversial situations extending in the field of professional ethics, law, sociology and morality. The dentist, teacher or sociologist has to take decisions that can significantly affect the life of others. Students are asked to identify the best possible strategies to deal with the problems, based on scientific evidence but also laws, professional ethics and social structures. The cases will be used for self-assessment and peer assessment in groups, as described by the Interactive Examination methodology. In brief this implies that the students describe, analyse and act, compare their own and other students´ or teachers’ ways to deal with a problem, and consequently articulate their needs of new competencies and define new learning objectives. Conclusions: The ability to successfully handle social, ethical and legal dimensions of patient treatment is a significant dimension of professionalism, which often is neglected in our curricula. This multidisciplinary project aims to broaden and strengthen the professional identity of dental students, thus better preparing them to operate in a complex society.

  • 38.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nattestad, A
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Schittek, M
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Attström, R
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    A virtual classroom for undergraduate periodontology: a pilot study2001In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 139-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Integrated Distributed Learning Environments or virtual classrooms constitute a new promising structure in education of health care personnel. A virtual classroom was developed aiming to teach periodontology to an international group of 28 dental students using a problem-based learning (PBL) approach. The course was web-based and included synchronous and asynchronous communication, on-line libraries and multimedia material. Students were organised in 4 independent groups and each group was appointed a tutor. The results of the study indicate that one of the most positive effects students experienced was competence in using the computer. They also rated highly the use of multimedia for learning of clinical procedures. It was found that web boards and email were too slow to allow group work in the virtual classroom. Real time communication programs were found to be superior for problem discussion and hypothesis formulation. However, email and the web board played a significant role during certain steps of the PBL method. The students expressed a positive attitude for the combined use of network-based learning and problem-based education. Our present experience suggests that distance learning should be organised with a mixture of different media, allowing communication of knowledge and skills between the resources and the students, as well as cooperation between the students. Computer literacy among teachers and students is limited and should be enhanced. Finally, personal contact between the resource persons and the students before the distant learning course commences helps the learning process.

  • 39.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nattestad, Anders
    University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Attström, Rolf
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Local CD-ROM in interaction with HTML documents over the Internet2000In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 124-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The internet and computer assisted learning have enhanced the possibilities of providing quality distance learning in dentistry. The use of multimedia material is an essential part of such distance learning courses. However the Internet technology available has limitations regarding transmission of large multimedia files. Therefore especially when addressing undergraduate students or geographically isolated professionals, large download times make distance learning unattractive. This problem was technically solved in a distance learning course for undergraduate students from all over Europe. The present communication describes a method to bypass the problem of transmitting large multimedia files by the use of a specially designed CD-ROM. This CD-ROM was run locally on the students' PC interacting with HTML documents sent over the Internet.

  • 40.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nattestad, Anders
    Christersson, Cecilia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jansson, Henrik
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Attström, Rolf
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    The Effects of an Interactive Software Application on The Self-Assessment Ability of Dental Students2004In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 97-104Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A randomised controlled trial was designed to test an Internet-based interactive application as a stand-alone support for the development of self-assessment skills among second-year dental students at the Faculty of Dentistry, University of Malmo, Sweden. Fifty-two students were randomised into an experimental (n = 26) and a control group (n = 26). Both groups went through four identical learning cases in elementary clinical Periodontology during a period of 1 month. The experimental group received the cases with the interactive software, while the control group received them through a static web page. After the end of the learning phase, both groups were assessed blindly by two assessors during the interactive examination methodology. There was a moderate agreement between the two assessors, but both failed to find any significant differences between the two groups with regard to self-assessment skills and overall performance of the students. Students positively received the Internet support, but several attitude differences were observed between the two groups during the study. Time on task and competence with computers were positively correlated to assessment results for both groups. On the basis of these findings, it remains unclear if computer-based applications with automated feedback can constitute an effective remedial support for the improvement of self-assessment skills of students. In addition, for such applications to be successfully accepted, two factors are critical: students must have a clear perception of the benefits deriving from the use of the software and the use of the software should be integrated in the curriculum, replacing some of the existing workload.

  • 41.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Schittek Janda, Martin
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Nattestad, Anders
    Shanley, D
    Attström, Rolf
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    A Comparative Evaluation of Computer Literacy Amongst Dental Educators and Students2005In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 32-36Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    A task-oriented questionnaire was designed, aiming to quickly assess competence with the use of computers. The questionnaire consisted of distinct computer-related skills, representing various competences in educational computer use. A total score from 0 to 49 was calculated upon completion of the questionnaire, based on the sum of all the positively identified competences. The questionnaire was distributed to an international group of leading dental educators during the DentEd Global Congress in Prague in 2001 and to a cohort of first year dental students (2001) in the Dental Faculty, University of Malmo, Sweden. Certain attitudes towards the role of information and communication technology (ICT) in dental education were also measured through Visual Analogue Scales in the educator’s group. A total of 149 questionnaires were collected from the educators’ group and 58 from the dental students. There was no significant difference in the average computer competence score between the two groups. The educators’ group average score was 20.7 (SD 9.9) and students’ average was 18.1 (SD 8.5). A significant positive correlation (r ¼ 0.395277, P < 0.0001) was found between the competence measured by the questionnaire and the year of graduation in the educators’ group. The attitudes towards the role of ICT in dental education amongst the educators were very positive, regardless of their competence with computers, year of graduation or academic position. The results from this study indicate that there is wide diversity in computer competence amongst both students and academic staff. In addition, students’ actual competence in the use of computers might not be as high as is often perceived through self-assessment and ordinal scales.

  • 42.
    Mattheos, Nikos
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Schittek, M
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Attström, R
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD). University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
    Lyon, H C
    Notre Dame College, Manchester, NH USA.
    Distance learning in academic health education2001In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 67-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distance learning is an apparent alternative to traditional methods in education of health care professionals. Non-interactive distance learning, interactive courses and virtual learning environments exist as three different generations in distance learning, each with unique methodologies, strengths and potential. Different methodologies have been recommended for distance learning, varying from a didactic approach to a problem-based learning procedure. Accreditation, teamwork and personal contact between the tutors and the students during a course provided by distance learning are recommended as motivating factors in order to enhance the effectiveness of the learning. Numerous assessment methods for distance learning courses have been proposed. However, few studies report adequate tests for the effectiveness of the distance-learning environment. Available information indicates that distance learning may significantly decrease the cost of academic health education at all levels. Furthermore, such courses can provide education to students and professionals not accessible by traditional methods. Distance learning applications still lack the support of a solid theoretical framework and are only evaluated to a limited extent. Cases reported so far tend to present enthusiastic results, while more carefully-controlled studies suggest a cautious attitude towards distance learning. There is a vital need for research evidence to identify the factors of importance and variables involved in distance learning. The effectiveness of distance learning courses, especially in relation to traditional teaching methods, must therefore be further investigated.

  • 43. McLoughlin, Jacinta
    et al.
    Zijlstra-Shaw, Sandra
    Davies, Julia
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Field, James
    The Graduating European Dentist: Domain I: Professionalism2017In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 21, no Supplement 1, p. 11-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper outlines the areas of competence and learning outcomes of “The Graduating European Dentist” that specifically relate to Professionalism. Professionalism is a commitment to a set of values, behaviours and relationships, which underpin the trust that the public hold in dental care professionals. Shortcomings within this domain are often responsible for patient dissatisfaction, concern and complaint—and emphasis is placed on the importance of embedding these values from an early stage within the curriculum.

  • 44.
    Milosavljevic, Aleksandar
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Stavropoulos, Andreas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Descroix, V
    Götrick, Bengt
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    A questionnaire-based study evaluating differences between dental students in Paris (F) and Malmö (SE) regarding diagnosis and treatment decisions of patients with different severity levels of periodontal diseases.2018In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 22, no 3, p. e392-e399Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate differences between last-year dental students in Paris (F) and Malmö (SE) Dental Schools, in regard to their judgement and decision-making within periodontology. Ninety-six last-year dental students from Paris and 45 from Malmö participated in a questionnaire study based on four patient cases: (i) Patient case with generalised alveolar bone loss but no signs of inflammation (Well-maintained), (ii) Patient case with generalised alveolar bone loss and signs of inflammation (Periodontitis), (iii) Patient case with no alveolar bone loss and no signs of inflammation (Healthy) and (iv) Patient case with no alveolar bone loss but with signs of inflammation (Gingivitis). Through multiple-choice questions, the students judged each case as healthy or diseased proposed a diagnosis and treatment measures and estimated the treatment time for each patient. Furthermore, they assessed the prognosis of each patient in case of no treatment. Based on a response rate of 83%, the majority in both groups judged all the patients as diseased. More Paris students diagnosed the healthy and the gingivitis case as having periodontitis (P < .05). Furthermore, a larger number of students from Paris recommended several treatment measures and estimated longer treatment times for all the cases (P < .05) and estimated a higher risk for disease progression for the healthy and the gingivitis case (P < .05). Significant variation between students from Paris and Malmö Dental Schools in regard to judgement and decision-making was observed; this may in turn imply that there is still need of improving consistency amongst undergraduate educations in periodontology in Europe.

  • 45. Nash, David
    et al.
    Ruotoistenmaäki, Juka
    Argentieri, Angela
    Barna, S
    Behbehani, Jaafar
    Berthold, Peter
    Catalanotto, Frank
    Chidzonga, Midion
    Goldblatt, Lawrence
    Jaafar, N
    Kikwilu, Emil
    Konoo, Tetsuro
    Kouzmina, Edith
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Mathu-Muju, Kavita
    Mumghamba, Elifuraha
    Nik Hussein, N
    Phantumvanit, Prathip
    Runnel, Riita
    Shaw, Honorata
    Forna, Norina
    Orliaguet, Tierry
    Honkala, Eino
    Profile of the oral healthcare team in countries with emerging economies2008In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 12, no Suppl. 1, p. 111-119Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Health is a critical dimension of human well-being and flourishing, and oral health is an integral component of health: one is not healthy without oral health. Significant barriers exist to ensuring the world's people receive basic healthcare, including oral healthcare. Amongst these are poverty, ignorance, inadequate financial resources and lack of adequate numbers of educated and trained (oral) healthcare workers. Emerging economies are encouraged to develop a national strategic plan for oral health. International organizations have developed goals for oral health that can be referenced and adapted by emerging economies as they seek to formulate specific objectives for their countries. Demographic data that assess the nature and extent of oral diseases in a country are essential to sound planning and the development of an oral healthcare system that is relevant, effective and economically viable. Prevention should be emphasized and priority consideration be given to oral healthcare for children. The types and numbers of members of the oral healthcare team (workforce) will vary from country to country depending on the system developed. Potential members of the workforce include: generalist dentists, specialist dentists, dental therapists, dental hygienists, denturists, expanded function dental assistants (dental nurses) and community oral health workers/aides. Competences for dentists, and other members of the team, should be developed to ensure quality care and developed economies should cooperate with emerging economies. The development, by more advanced economies, of digital, virtual curricula, which could be used by emerging economies for educating and training members of the oral healthcare team, should be an important initiative. The International Federation of Dental Educators and Associations (IFDEA) should lead in such an effort.

  • 46. Plasschaert, Alphons J
    et al.
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    McLoughlin, Jacinta
    Manogue, Michael
    Murtomaa, Heikki
    Nattestad, Anders
    Sanz, Mariano
    Curriculum structure and the European Credit Transfer System for European dental schools: part I2006In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 10, no 3, p. 123-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Department of Cariology and Endodontology, College of Dental Sciences, University Medical Centre Nijmegen, The Netherlands. a.plasschaert@dent.umcn.nl This paper presents a proposed curriculum structure and system of European Credit Transfer (ECTS) for undergraduate dental schools throughout Europe. It is the result of the work of a Taskforce ('Taskforce II'), appointed by DentEd, a thematic network of European dental schools and the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE). There has been pan-European discussion of the document in draft stages (it was distributed to 200 dental schools) and following amendment, it was agreed formally at the National Assembly of ADEE in Athens, Greece, in September 2005. The main elements of the paper relate to: (i) a description of the framework proposed with relevance to the Bologna recommendations and common directive on recognition for professional qualifications as they apply to Dentistry; (ii) the structure of an undergraduate dental curriculum; (iii) student exchange and ECTS. In addition, the paper presents a series of requirements, guidelines and recommendations for action. ADEE expects that the 'requirements' proposed will be followed by dental schools in Europe, whilst the 'guidelines' and 'recommendations' also provided are open to local interpretation. The paper is also published on the ADEE website.

  • 47. Plasschaert, Alphons J
    et al.
    Manogue, Michael
    Lindh, Christina
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    McLoughlin, Jacinta
    Murtomaa, Heikki
    Nattestad, Anders
    Sanz, Mariano
    Curriculum content, structure and ECTS for European dental schools. Part II: methods of learning and teaching, assessment procedures and performance criteria2007In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 125-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a brief context of dental undergraduate curricular structure and content and lays out the Association for Dental Education in Europe's views on requirements and recommendations for learning, teaching and assessment procedures/performance.

  • 48. Quinn, Barry
    et al.
    Field, James
    Gorter, Ronald
    Akota, Ilze
    Manzanares, Maria-Cristina
    Paganelli, Corrado
    Davies, Julia R
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dixon, Jonathan
    Gabor, Gerber
    Amaral Mendes, Rui
    Hahn, Petra
    Vital, Sibylle
    O'Brien, Judith
    Murphy, Denis
    Tubert-Jeannin, Stephanie
    COVID-19: The immediate response of european academic dental institutions and future implications for dental education2020In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 811-814Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has had an immediate and dramatic impact on dental education. The Association of Dental Education in Europe decided to carry out an investigation to assess the immediate response of European Academic Dental Institutions. An online survey was sent to both member and non-member dental schools to investigate the impact on non-clinical and clinical education, assessment and the well-being/pastoral care measures implemented. The preliminary findings and discussion are presented in this paper, for the responses collected between the 25 March and 5 April 2020. The survey at this time of publication is ongoing, and detailed results can be accessed .

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Roxner, Rikard
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Hallberg, Ulrika
    Berlin, Henrik
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klingberg, Gunilla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Undergraduate dental students' perceptions of dental pain in children - A grounded theory study.2024In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: There is an underuse of pain management strategies in dental care for children, possibly owing to perceived stress and discomfort when treating children, which has also been reported by dental students. The aim of this study was to explore how undergraduate dental students experience and understand pain related to dental treatment in children.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interviews were held with 21 Swedish dental students, from 3 dental schools, all in their final 2 years of education. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed according to Grounded Theory.

    RESULTS: A core category, seeking guidance to avoid pain, was identified and related to 6 conceptual categories. The students used different strategies to manage pain prevention in child dentistry and to become skilled dentists. They described high levels of stress, as well as having high expectations on themselves when treating children. The stress led to a surface learning approach, something the students were not fully aware of.

    CONCLUSION: All children should have the right to be ensured optimal pain prevention in dental care. The basis for this is laid during undergraduate education. Thus, pain management in child dentistry is an area in need of special attention in this respect. The academic staff has an important role in supporting their students in their process to gain an identity as professional dentists. To ensure that students incorporate an understanding of the importance of pain prevention when treating children there is a need to create more integration between theory and clinical training in undergraduate education.

  • 50.
    Schittek Janda, Martin
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Mattheos, N
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Lyon, H C
    Attström, R
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Computer assisted learning. A review.2001In: European journal of dental education, ISSN 1396-5883, E-ISSN 1600-0579, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1980 the amount of medical information has doubled approximately every second year. This implies that oral health students as well as professionals need to manage the flow of information rationally, in order to learn how to undertake evidence-based decision-making for diagnosis and treatment in a given patient situation. Current research indicates that computer connected databases and computer assisted learning (CAL) may enhance learning and provide the clinician with information for decision-making when treating patients. Multimedia for CAL, which combines audio and visual data in an interactive form, has proved to be an effective tool in education. CAL may supplement and reinforce more traditional learning and create opportunities to illustrate clinical situations in an interactive way. CAL has the potential to help students develop skills and knowledge. Students, staff and professionals consider CAL stimulating and motivating. Students easily adapt to CAL although their current computer literacy is still low. New authoring tools make it easier for faculties to develop their own CAL software. In the future we will see more sophisticated software with virtual patients who can communicate and interact with the student in a very realistic way. The software will even "step out" from the screen and help the student with clinical procedures. However, at present CAL should not replace traditional education, but rather be used more as a supplement and for self-directed studies.

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