Malmö University Publications
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  • 1.
    Brodén, Joséphine
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Heimdal, Håvard
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Josefsson, Oliver
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Fransson, Helena
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Direct pulp capping procedures versus root canal treatment in young permanent vital teeth with pulp exposures due to caries: A systematic review2016In: American Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0894-8275, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 201-206Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To evaluate the available evidence on pulp capping procedures and root canal treatment in young permanent teeth with vital pulps exposed by caries. Methods: The study was conducted as a systematic review of the literature. Three databases, PubMed, Web of Knowledge, and The Cochrane Library were searched. Reference lists of relevant articles were hand searched. The quality of all relevant publications was rated. Results: Ten original scientific studies were included in the review. The quality was rated as low in all studies. The search failed to disclose any article directly comparing pulp capping and root canal treatment. The level of evidence was insufficient to draw any conclusions regarding the effectiveness of the two treatment concepts. High success rates are reported for pulp capping procedures in exposure due to caries, though it is not possible to compare them to success rates of root canal treatment. The review confirms the lack of high quality studies on the treatment of young permanent teeth with cariously exposed pulps.

  • 2. Odatsu, Tetsurou
    et al.
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Watanabe, Ikuya
    Sawase, Takashi
    Effect of polishing and finishing procedures on the surface integrity of restorative ceramics2013In: American Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0894-8275, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 51-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of surface polishing and finishing methods on the surface roughness of restorative ceramics. METHODS: Disk specimens were prepared from feldspar-based, lithium disilicate-based, fluorapatite leucite-based and zirconia ceramics. Four kinds of surface polishing/finishing methods evaluated were: Group 1: Control: carborundum points (CP); Group 2: silicon points (SP); Group 3: diamond paste (DP); Group 4: glazing (GZ). Surface roughness was measured using an interferometer and the parameters of Sa (average height deviation of the surface) and St (maximum peak-to-valley height of the surface) were evaluated. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA (P < 0.05) followed by post-hoc test. The mean values were also compared by Student's t-test. Specimen surfaces were evaluated by 3-D images using an interferometer. RESULTS: The zirconia showed the least surface roughness (Sa and St) values after grinding with carborundum points. The significantly lowest Sa values and St values were obtained for lithium disilicate and zirconia ceramics surfaces finished with DP and GZ. The fluorapatite leucite ceramic showed significantly reduced Sa and St values from DP to GZ. The feldspathic porcelain showed the highest surface roughness values among all types of ceramics after all of the polishing/finishing procedures.

  • 3.
    Reinedahl, David
    et al.
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Pär
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Galli, Silvia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Kjellin, Per
    Promimic AB, AstraZeneca BioVentureHub, Mõlndal, Sweden.
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Wennerberg, Ann
    Department of Prosthodontics, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Review of PEEK implants and biomechanical and immunological responses to a zirconium phosphate nano-coated PEEK, a blasted PEEK, and a turned titanium implant surface.2022In: American Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0894-8275, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To investigate the biomechanical and immunological reactions to coated and non-coated blasted PEEK implants in vivo after 12 weeks and review the associated literature.

    METHODS: Two osteotomy sites were performed in each proximal tibia of 10 lop-eared rabbits (n= 4 per rabbit). Each rabbit received a randomly placed (1) blasted zirconium phosphate nano-coated PEEK- (nano-ZrP), (2) blasted PEEK- (PEEK) and (3) titanium implant (Ti) and an empty sham site. At 12 weeks, removal torque of all implants and biological investigation with qPCR was performed. The implant surfaces were analyzed prior to insertion with interferometry, SEM and XPS.

    RESULTS: The interferometry analysis showed that there was no difference in roughness for the uncoated PEEK compared to the ZrP coated PEEK implants. The titanium implants were considerably smoother (Sa= 0.23 µm) than the uncoated Sa= 1.11 µm) and ZrP coated PEEK implants (Sa= 1.12 µm). SEM analysis on the PEEK implants corroborated the interferometry results; no difference in structure between the uncoated vs. the ZrP coated PEEK was visible on the micrometer level. At higher magnifications, the ZrP coating was visible in the SEM as a thin, porous network. All tested implants displayed osseointegration with the highest RTQ for nano-ZrP (18.4 Ncm) followed by PEEK (14.5 Ncm) and Ti (11.5 Ncm). All implants activated the immune system, with elevated macrophage and M2 macrophage qPCR markers at 12 weeks compared to the sham site.

    CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Nano-ZrP coating improves osseointegration of blasted PEEK implants at 12 weeks of follow-up. Osseointegration of titanium, PEEK and nano-ZrP PEEK is not a normal bone healing process, but rather a shield-off mechanism that appears to be regulated by the innate immune system.

  • 4.
    Wennerberg, Ann
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Bougas, Konstantinos
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Jimbo, Ryo
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Albrektsson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Implant coatings: new modalities for increased osseointegration2013In: American Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0894-8275, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To present new techniques for implant coatings, biological tissue response to them, and, if applicable, clinical outcome. METHODS: A search for publications was done in PubMed using search words such as coated dental implants, clinical outcome, dental implant coatings and combinations thereof. Further, a manual search was done. 216 papers were found; the selection was directed towards in vivo investigations. RESULTS: Several different coatings are described in the literature, many of them with the purpose to be bioactive. Such surface coatings include hydroxyapatite, bioglass, proteins, polysaccharides and drugs. The majority of the publications are evaluations in vitro; most of the in vivo studies are directed to implant incorporation in bone. Rather few exist that use a coat to promote soft tissue adhesion or prevention of infection.

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