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  • 1. Al-Akabi, Rania
    et al.
    Daabas, Walaa
    Skyddsåtgärder för anställda socionomer:ett konstruktivistiskt perspektiv2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate from a constructivist perspective, what protective measures managers take against violence and threats for social workers. The focus will be on two occupations: Social Services and Health and Care services. Also, to compare their protective measures and investigate if there are other protective measures to improve the safety of social workers. The method that has been used is the qualitative method, because the constructivist theory is best achieved by a method that goes in-depth and searches for context. Semi-structured interviews were conducted by using a strategic selection. The selection was homogenous, consisting of three managers from each occupation. The results show a constructed image made by the managers of a low rate of threats on the two occupations. The results also show similar constructed protective measures. For instance, a social worker can speak with the manager, have a personal alarm at home, or speak with a safety coordinator. Other common measures include contacting the occupational health service and handing over the matter to another employee. There is the possibility of bodyguard protection and taking a taxi from and to work in times of discomfort. Some differences are found as well, such as there are always two social workers for home visits in social services while there are only two social workers for first-time visits in Health and Care services. In conclusion, there are differences and similarities regarding the constructed protective measures employed in both occupations. Another conclusion is to develop and introduce new protective measures. There is a lack of research on how social workers experience the protective measures against violence and threats in the working places. Therefore, more research must be done on their experiences.

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  • 2.
    Alftberg, Åsa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Sharing knowledge: Neuroscience and the circulation of medical knowledge2020In: Movement of knowledge: Medical humanities perspectives on medicine, science, and experience / [ed] Kristofer Hansson; Rachel Irwin, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2020, p. 91-109Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the views on medical knowledge and its circulation from the perspective of a privileged group – the scientists themselves who are the main actors in producing medical knowledge. The concept of sharing knowledge helps to highlight how knowledge circulation is affected by digitalisation, which changes scientific working conditions and sometimes makes sharing problematic. It reveals the underlying idea of knowledge as an exclusive property and the frictions that occur when this idea is challenged.

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  • 3.
    Björling, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Heroes, Villains & Victims: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the Swedish News Media’s Representation of Frontex2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores in which ways the EUs border management agency Frontex was represented as a ‘humanitarian’ actor in the Swedish news media during Operation Triton 2014-2017 in the Central Mediterranean. It conducts a critical discourse analysis of Sweden’s largest newspaper Aftonbladet, using traditional and contemporary understandings of humanitarianism paired with saviour, villain, and victim narratives as a theoretical framework. The thesis concludes that such narratives were reproduced in the Swedish news media’s representation of the agency and when combined with the notion of ‘Swedish exceptionalism’, Frontex was especially portrayed as a humanitarian actor. Furthermore, the thesis argues that Frontex was considered a ‘discourse technologist’ within certain areas of the EUs border regime, and that Sweden’s humanitarian position in the EU was compromised during the 2015 refugee ‘crisis’. The research contributes to the field by concentrating explicitly on Frontex in the Swedish news media, which existing research is lacking. 

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  • 4.
    Broadway, John
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Terroir in Motion: Making Space for Dynamic Ontologies2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 28 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 5.
    Bruhn, Jørgen
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Salmose, Niklas
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för språk (SPR).
    Schirrmacher, Beate
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för film och litteratur (IFL).
    Tornborg, Emma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Culture, Languages and Media (KSM). Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Truthfulness and truth claims as transmedial phenomena2022In: Intermedial Studies: An Introduction to Meaning Across Media / [ed] Jørgen Bruhn; Beate Schirrmacher, Routledge , 2022, p. 225-254Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter explores different relations of truthfulness and discusses the truth claims of the different qualified media types. Truthfulness is a transmedial notion and when we speak of truth in different contexts, we refer to different kinds of knowledge. Truth, facts and authenticity are often used in everyday discourse as part of apparently clear-cut binaries like truth–lie, authentic–fake, fact–fiction. The truth claims of media can be employed in communication to produce a perception of truthfulness. As media products can be truthful both in relation to external perception or inner experience, another way to look at truth claims is to divide them into objective and subjective truth claims. The chapter discusses how different forms of disinformation draw on the truth claims of news media and construct a perception of truthfulness that is based more on internal coherence than on events that actually have taken place.

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    FULLTEXT01
  • 6.
    Cory, Erin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Trans/Intifada: The Politics and Poetics of Intersectional Resistance.2020In: American Studies in Scandinavia, ISSN 0044-8060, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 155-157Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cory, Erin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Möller, Per
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Translocality and Translocal Subjectivities : A Research Overview Across the Fields of Migration, Culture, and Urban Studies2020Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The present report is an attempt to provide an overview over intersecting beginnings,

    emergencies, and prolongations that reinforces a theoretical reflection on contemporary

    cultural debate and its repercussions on societal development. With the current research

    overview, we want to draw attention to assumptions about culture(s), as they are played out in

    the intersection of migration and sustainable urban development. Multi-layered and doubleedged,

    ‘culture’ often comes with territorial postulates and implicit ideas about belongings and

    borders, movements and rights of priority. The report approaches these entangled issues from

    several angles. With the point of departure in current environmental policy, the first section of

    the report, therefore, approaches ideas of “sustainability” via the notions of “culture” and

    “locality”. A second section briefly discusses the methodological challenges of researching

    emergent cultural phenomena across both geographical and disciplinary borders. In a third

    section, we turn to three research reports, a sampling of the report literature, but representative

    of how global, regional and local perspectives on culture today are ‘scaffolded’ in relation to

    mobility and migration. A fourth section introduces emergent transversal, i.e. non-categorical,

    approaches to cultural research, primarily focusing on how notions such as transnationalism

    and translocality may inform new modes of research and urban development. A fifth section

    finally, articulates some recommendations about how to relate to translocal space and

    translocal subjectivities in practice and how to craft research approaches that not only involve

    interlocutors but also answers to and actively engage in current spatial and cultural changes.

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    translocality
  • 8.
    Dahlbeck, Johan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Childhood, Education and Society (BUS).
    At the wake, or the return of metaphysics2020In: What Comes After Postmodernism in Educational Theory? / [ed] Michael A. Peters, Marek Tesar, Liz Jackson & Tina Besley, Routledge, 2020Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Bolter, Jay David
    The Aesthetics of Reality Media2020In: Journal of Visual Culture, ISSN 1470-4129, E-ISSN 1741-2994, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 81-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the authors examine the aesthetics of immersion in two emerging media forms: 360° video and 3D VR. Their goal is to move beyond addressing technical affordances, to consider the techniques and choices that producers of 360° video and 3D VR are making to exploit these affordances, and what resulting effects those viewing experiences have. They discuss the tension between transparency and reflectivity in two contrasting examples, in particular: the Danish company Makropol’s Anthropia (2017) and Arora and Unseld’s The Day the World Changed (2018). The authors argue that technical affordances are part of a complex process of mediation that includes both experimentation with the technology at hand and a reliance on earlier media forms. It is critical, they argue, to understand the creative tension between established forms and new ones that underscore new aesthetic and narrative experiences in VR and 360° formats.

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  • 10.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Have, IbenAarhus University, Denmark.Pedersen, Birgitte StougaardAarhus University, Denmark.
    The Digital Reading Condition2022Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume offers a critical overview of digital reading practices and scholarly efforts to analyze and understand reading in the mediatized landscape. Building on research about digital reading, born-digital literature, and digital audiobooks, The Digital Reading Condition explores reading as part of a broader cultural shift encompassing many forms of media and genres.

    Bringing together research from media and literary studies, digital humanities, scholarship on reading and learning, as well as sensory studies and research on multimodal and multisensory media reception, the authors address and challenge print-biased conceptions of reading that are still prevalent in research, whether the reading medium is print or digital. They argue that the act of reading itself is changing, and rather than rejecting digital media as unsuitable for sustained or focused reading practices, they argue that the complex media landscape challenges us to rethink how to define reading as a mediated practice.

    Presenting a truly interdisciplinary perspective on digital reading practices, this volume will appeal to scholars and graduate students in communication, media studies, new media and technology, literature, digital humanities, literacy studies, composition, and rhetoric.

  • 11.
    Engberg, Maria
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Stougaard Pedersen, Birgitte
    Aarhus University, Denmark.
    Reading across Media, Technologies, and Senses2022Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Digital media conditions shape new forms of reading. We read on a daily basis on various digital platforms: we read books, we search for information while reading on screens, we use apps on our smartphones, and we read audiobooks. A number of these practices challenge the former print-biased definitions of reading to which we are accustomed, and foreground intermedial practices of aesthetic works. They also challenge how we understand the sensory input that is activated while we read such works and in what contexts such reading takes place. The aim of this paper is to present our analysis of  these extended practises of reading in a digital landscape by proposing reading as a travelling concept (Bal 2002) that moves across different media contexts and moves inbetween disciplinary concerns. Central to our analysis is the material and intermedial interplay between medium and material affordances which in turn shapes the reading experience (Hayles 2005). 

    By bringing selected research fields and contributions regarding reading into dialogue with each other, we will exemplify what we see are common scholarly issues when analyzing digital reading today, specifically the multisensory address inherent in many digital texts: we are invited to touch, listen, watch, possibly take part in movement and interaction, look at images and text, listen to the timbre of voices of an audiobook reading and so forth. These elements must, we argue, play a larger role when analyzing these distinctly digital reading conditions (reimagining Jerome McGann’s 1991 analyses of the textual condition). In this paper, through analyses of digital reading situations in Tender Claws Pry (2014) and Sally Rooney’s Beautiful World, Where Are You (2021) read by Aoife MaMahon that challenge the print bias that is still the foundation of the reading concept, we explore the assumptions and value judgments that imbue the concept of reading. 

  • 12.
    Eriksen, Mette Agger
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Hellström Reimer, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Toftager Larsen, Majken
    Games are Political: Challenging Municipal Urban Planning Practices For Sustainable Development and Mutual Learning Through Game Co-designing2020In: Routledge Companion to Games in Architecture and Urban Planning: Tools for design, teaching, and research / [ed] Brkovic Dodig, Marta;Groat, Linda, London: Routledge, 2020, p. 32-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter draws on experiences and lessons learned from a process of hands-on, reflective game co-designing. The case is from the Urban Transition Öresund project (2013-14) which involved co-design and urban researchers, professional game designers, and civil servants working with complex, cross-sector sustainable urban planning in threemunicipalities in Scandinavia. The process included framing, co-designing, testing and playing what came to be called the “Urban Transition” game – explored in various real-world urban planning processes. By dissecting four co-design and play testing situations of this serious, dialogue game, the chapter aims to elucidate the inherent abilities of games as formats for collaboration, negotiation and mutual learning. The main claim is that games are practically “political” – in the sense that they can re-open taken-for-granted urban planning themes by emphasizing details and holistic views; can reveal assumptions about others by actualizing conflicts and can challenge current and possible future municipal, situated socio-material collaborative practices. Therefore, in urban planning processes[F1]  aimed at sustainable development, games and game co-designing should not be seen as de-politicized quick fixes but rather as highly “political” platforms for negotiation.

  • 13.
    Freitas de Souza, Camila
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Chilean Uprising: Grassroots movements as an instrument of contestation to social injustice and neoliberal urbanism2020Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In October 2019, a wave of massive demonstrations took place in Santiago de Chile and this movement was stamped in several newspaper covers worldwide. People shouting against the Chilean neoliberal system, holding posters with anti-imperialist sayings, and organizing artistic interventions on the streets went viral in social media. The message was clear – for several consecutive months, people in Chile were actively questioning the political, economic, and societal systems as well as the power struggles faced in the country. Relying on the 2019-2020 Chilean Uprising as a case study, this research investigates the consistency of the Santiago de Chile demonstrations by connecting its social claims to the field of urban studies for the understanding of social and spatial constructions. The thesis relies on postcolonial, decolonial, and critical urban theories, a critical perspective of the neoliberal system, the Lefebvrian Right to the City concept, and Manuel Castells' grassroots movements definition, as well as semi structured interviews and newspapers articles as empirical data for the enhancement of the debate.

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    US660E Camilla
  • 14.
    Harvard Maare, Åsa
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Addo, Giuseppina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Taher, Hassan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Å utvide Tingenes metode2023In: Tingenes metode: museenes kunnskapstopografi / [ed] Henrik Treimo, Lars Risan, Ketil Gjølme Andersen, Marianne Løken, Torhild Skåtun, Trondheim: Museumsforlaget AS, 2023Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Hertzberg, Charlotte
    Malmö högskola, Library.
    TERMS på MAH2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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    TERMS på MAH
  • 16.
    Hoekstra, Tijmen
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    In Search of a Posture of Peace: Nuclear deterrence and the possibility of a Non-Offensive Defence with examples of India, Pakistan and Kazakhstan2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis takes the initial steps to find what it calls a ‘posture of peace’, a counterpart to what Hobbes refers to as a posture of war (Hobbes 1651/2004: 79)1. A posture of war representsdefensive initiatives that can be interpreted by others as a certain preparation for conflict, and its base definition is used as a template to formulate an initial version of a posture of peace2.While keeping this concept as an overarching theme throughout the thesis explores the concepts of nuclear posture and a credible minimum deterrence (CMD) through the examples of India and Pakistan. While the thesis discusses four different nuclear postures, there really are only two categories, namely the pro-nuclear and anti-nuclear posture. The main examples of pronuclear posture used here is the case of India and Pakistan, two geographical neighbouring Nuclear Weapon States (NWS) who have been experiencing ongoing frictions and conflicts since (and prior to) becoming nuclear powers. On the other side Kazakhstan serves as an example of an anti-nuclear posture and in regards to the nuclear debate a possible empirical example of a posture of peace. In addition to these postures there is also the concept of NonOffensive Defence (NOD), which is more exemplified in the Kazakhstan’s approach to their nuclear situation as well as their more contemporary initiative in collaboration with several other neighbouring states to form the Central Asia Nuclear Weapons Free Zone (CANWFZ). The thesis concludes that while NOD finds little support in pro-nuclear posturing, there is ample space for it over on the ani-nuclear posture side of the spectrum which in addition aligns more with the present interpretation of a posture of peace. Moreover, the CANWFZ initiative appears to be as close a perfect example of a NOD in the present case and as close as this stage of the research will come to observing a posture of peace.

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  • 17.
    Katya, Maneva
    School of Arts and Communication.
    Through the eyes of the worker: AVC for social change in an organization2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Audiovisual communication (AVC) is a beautiful and exciting part of communication!

    This study examines AVC as a powerful motor of developing people’s minds. The study views an organisation as a complex social system, while those who form the organisation search for work-life balance and people skills development. Virtually supplements face-to-face communication in the event where such is not possible due to various reasons. In the digital world, often the way of communicating. Audiences who use their senses to engage in an interactive form of AVC remember those events for a more extended period. A glimpse at AVC from the perspective of the verbal and visual forms that we, who form the organisation, encounter daily as part of our jobs. There is no doubt that through AVC, one can convey just about any message, as it is one of the complete areas of communication. 

    Communication enables a form of dialogue and can increase awareness of significant problems and social issues, such as change, human rights, environmental degradation, structure, hierarchy, perception, acceptance, to name a few. 

    A massive number of the world’s population uses AVC. The study’s frame shows the current state of audiovisual communication and its efficient models through qualitative, hermeneutics, and grounded methodology. We are social animals, digital social animals, that is.  

    The fight for attention through communication is rapidly growing, and AVC serves as a secret weapon for that fight. 

  • 18.
    Labajová, Lucia
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The state of AI: Exploring the perceptions, credibility, and trustworthiness of the users towards AI-Generated Content2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 80 credits / 120 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis explores the perception and trustworthiness of the users towards artificial intelligence (AI) -generated content on social media platforms. The study employs the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Framing Theory as theoretical frameworks to understand the factors influencing user attitudes and behaviours towards AI-generated content. The research explores three main areas: user trust in AI-generated content, the ability to differentiate between AI-generated and human-generated content and the ethical implications of AI-generated content use.

    The research employed an online survey with 100 participants to collect quantitative data on their experiences and perceptions of AI-generated content. The findings indicate a range of trust levels in AI-generated content, with a general trend towards cautious acceptance. The results also reveal a gap between the participants' perceived and actual abilities to distinguish between AI-generated content, underlining the need for improved media literacy and awareness initiatives. The thematic analysis of the respondent's opinions on the ethical implications of AI-generated content underscored concerns about misinformation, bias, and a perceived lack of human essence. The study connects these findings with the TAM and Framing Theory, suggesting that perceived usefulness and the framing of AI-generated content significantly impact user trust and acceptance.

    This research contributes to the ongoing discourse on AI in media and communications, underlining the need for a more nuanced understanding and responsible AI ecosystem development. It highlights the crucial role of public perception, awareness, and ethical considerations in shaping the future of AI-generated content on social media platforms

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  • 19. Lepik, Krista
    et al.
    Mägi, Reet
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Kuidas mõtestavad ekspositsioonikoostajad auditooriumidekaasamist?: Kujuteldavadauditooriumid ja kaasamisviisidTartu Ülikooli loodusmuuseumiuue püsiekspositsiooni loomisel2020In: Eesti Rahva Muuseumi aastaraamat, ISSN 1406-0388, Vol. 62, p. 21-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to enhance the understanding of audience engagement and ways of its shaping in relation to permanent expositions by using the example of Tartu University Natural History Museum. We focus on the role of exhibition curators as content creators in the shaping of audience engagement. The study is informed by constructivist grounded theory and draws upon eleven semi-structured interviews with the curators of the new permanent exhibition of Tartu University Natural History Museum. In order to understand better the curators’ perspectives our analysis relies on the concept of imagined audiences and seeks to answer questions about what kind of engagement modes can be identified from the curators’ comments and what processes the latter were influenced by. The theme of museum audiences and engagement modes should already be familiar to the reader from previous Yearbooks of the Estonian National Museum (Runnel ja Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt 2012; Runnel, Lepik, Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt 2014; Lotina 2014; Rattus 2016). Earlier discussions, however, placed more emphasis to the existence of audiences and engagement modes, and were less concerned with how curatorial considerations can impact the formation of audience engagement and how this formative process may be directed. Furthermore, the earlier in-depth identification of engagement modes and examination of the interrelationships between their various aspects was underpinned by a holistic view on museum activities (Lotina 2016), while the present treatment focuses on the specific context of museum expositions. The concept of imagined audiences (Litt 2012) draws on the study of social media, but for this article we have applied its principles to a museum exposition, which is a far more static communicative environment. 40 The study answered the questions about the kind of audiences the curators who put together the permanent exhibition of Tartu University Museum of Natural History were envisioning and what factors influenced the construction of audiences as well as what engagement modes were designed for the exposition. Individuals and institutions were distinguished among the audiences, both of which were in turn comprised of more detailed groups. Building on Gidden’s theory of structuration (1984) and Litt’s notion of an imagined audience (Litt 2012) the factors influencing the curators were grouped as either structural or agential. The following modes of engagement with the permanent display emerged: teaching, attracting interest, co-operation and provisions for stakeholders. Teaching was closely interlinked with the main objective of renewing the permanent display: the intent is to create a learning environment for non-formal environmental education, and in this respect it resembled the informing mode of audience engagement identified by Lotina (2016). Attracting interest was a mode of engagement which bore similarities to the marketing engagement mode previously described by Lotina (2016). Co-operation where visitors contribute towards the fulfillment of the museum’s objectives offered limited possibilities within the context of the permanent exhibition, but it holds considerable potential in the planning of future developments of the exposition. Providing for stakeholders was reflected in the museum’s consideration of the stakeholders’ needs, and it allows the museum to develop various services. All in all, both museums and their permanent displays offer valuable material for analysing the way in which audiences and their engagement modes are shaped. A better understanding of these processes will help us expand the possibilities of engaging actual audiences. Identifying messages, audiences and activities is a natural part of the planning of any permanent exhibition; however, the content creators’ visions of the upcoming exhibition also merit a detailed examination, and thereby particular factors that favour or constrain curatorial creativity will become clearer.

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  • 20.
    Lund, Martin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Whiteness2022Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The socially constructed phenomenon of whiteness: how it was created, how it changes, and how it protects and privileges people who are perceived as white.

    This volume in the MIT Press Essential Knowledge series examines the socially constructed phenomenon of whiteness, tracing its creation, its changing formation, and its power to privilege and protect people who are perceived as white. Whiteness, author Martin Lund explains, is not one single idea but a shifting, overarching category, a flexible cluster of historically, culturally, and geographically contingent ideals and standards that enable systems of hierarchical classification. Lund discusses words used to talk about whiteness, from white privilege to white fragility; the intersections of whiteness with race, class, and gender; whiteness in popular culture; and such ideas as “colorblindness” and “reverse racism,” which, he argues, actually uphold whiteness.

    Lund shows why it is important to keep talking and thinking about whiteness. The word “whiteness,” he writes, doesn't describe; it conjures something into being. Drawing on decades of critical whiteness studies and citing a range of examples (primarily from the United States and Sweden), Lund argues that whiteness is continually manufactured and sustained through language, laws, policies, science, and representations in media and popular culture. It is often positioned as normative, even universal. And despite its innocuous-seeming manifestations in sitcoms and superheroes, whiteness is always in the service of racial domination.

  • 21.
    Mansoux, Aymeric
    et al.
    Piet Zwart Institute, Rotterdam.
    Roscam Abbing, Roel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Seven Theses on the Fediverse and the Becoming of FLOSS2020In: The Eternal Network: The Ends and Becomings of Network Culture / [ed] Kristoffer Gansing; Inga Luchs, Institute for Network Cultures and Transmediale , 2020, p. 124-140Chapter in book (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 22.
    Mathieu, David
    et al.
    Roskilde university.
    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander
    Roskilde university.
    Kleut, Jelena
    University of Novi Sad.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Questioning the business–humanities divide in media studies: A reformulation of the administrative–critical distinction in stakeholder collaboration2022In: Business Meets the Humanities: The Human Perspective in University-Industry Collaboration / [ed] Mahnke, Martina; Nielsen, Mikka; Petersen, Matilde;Tjørring, Lise, New York: Routledge, 2022Chapter in book (Refereed)
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    fulltext
  • 23.
    Mihail, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    At Risk for Aiding the Vulnerable: A Critical Discourse Analysis on Legal Discourse for the Case of Protecting Human Rights Defenders2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 12 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    This study investigates the legal discourse in case law regarding the violation of freedom of expression for human rights defenders, in order to examine how they are represented by states and within an international legal framework. There are still gaps in research trying to explain how and why HRDs get prosecuted for their work of promoting and continuing the respect for human rights. Through employing a critical discourse analysis on legal cases concerning HRDs, while applying the perspective of international legal documents and of the critical theory on power, the current thesis presents depictions of how HRDs are represented in discourse by States and International bodies. The focus here is to identify guidelines of legal protection and at the same time to observe the ways of governments legitimizing violations of the rights of HRDs.

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  • 24.
    Milakovic, Andrea
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Translating the influence of the river: an exploratory study of the social benefits in river restorations2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This Master’s thesis aims to fill the research gaps by providing a study that clearly defines and concretizes the social benefits in river restorations. By further analysing the significance of the social benefits the aim is further to gain a better understanding of the factors that enable people to reap greater social benefits in river restoration.

    Given the dearth in research, an exploratory research approach is chosen to guide this thesis, on the premises that it provides and generates greater descriptions and broader understandings of the social benefits in river restorations. In addition, the exploratory approach enables analysis and arguments using both primary and secondary research methods, which are applied through literature reviews, official website analysis and interviews with representatives of the single organizations.

    The factors considered to constitute the social benefits in river restoration are well-being, aesthetics, recreation, play and learn, cultural expression, social cohesion and sense of belonging. When analysing the key factors that enable people to benefit from the social benefits of river restoration, the recognition includes relational values, active citizenship, public participation, knowledge sharing and social dynamics. In addition, the data collected from the single organizations indicate different levels of citizens’ activity and participation, i.e., semi-active, participating, active and highly active. Lastly, this thesis’ contribution to the research field is of great value, as the main findings demonstrate a coherence and consistency between the theoretical reasonings and the identifications of the four single organizations.

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  • 25.
    Mørk, Amalie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    City of the Anthropocene: A Case Study of Lynetteholm, Copenhagen.2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is a study upon a global vision of a sustainable future, to local implementation of environmentally effective solutions, in contemporary urban planning projects. The purpose was to illuminate a gap between the global rationality of sustainability and local rationality of sustainability and to identify the effect it has on sustainable outcomes. To do so, I did qualitative research on the Lynetteholm development project and analyzed the data using document – and critical discourse analysis. My research was guided by the theory of ecological modernization, their perspectives upon sustainable solutions within the capitalist-liberal democratic society, and urban regime theory, which provided an insight into the concept of scale in environmental politics. Through an in-depth analysis of the presented motivation and prime drivers behind the Lynetteholm project proposal and the impact it has on sustainable outcomes, I have found that the local vision of sustainability is constructed by hegemonic narratives of prosperous urbanity, that is equalized with growth, progress, and profit. I have identified economic growth as the prime driver of developing Lynetteholm and concluded that it has a significant impact on sustainable outcomes, as economic growth is not compatible with sustainable development, without political interference. In addition, the gap between global and local rationality of sustainability in urban planning lies in the process of redelegating the responsibility to implement sustainable practices and secure an environmentally beneficial outcome. The issue is that despite much expertise and knowledge of the field, planners and politicians continue to address socio-ecologic impacts isolated and reject the cumulative effects, which inevitably retains the sustainable transformation from taking place. 

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  • 26.
    Nahorska, Joanna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    The (In)Human Face of Ukraine: Neocolonial Media Representations of a European Crisis2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master of Fine Arts (Two Years)), 40 credits / 60 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The international response to the war in Ukraine has sparked unprecedented international support. The extend and scale of refugee welcome has not been witnessed ever before, while the levels of funding, live media coverage, military and political assistance have reached record levels. However, the underlying representation of war-affected people in media narratives has not undergone a critical shift when compared to historical conflict coverage, even though a displaced person has transformed from a “distant other” to one’s neighbour, as a refugee lemma has come to denote people coming from a European nation for the first time in decades. I argue that regardless of the geographical positioning and proximity of the Ukraine war, the modes of representation of this armed conflict in traditional media is still rooted in colonial narratives, corresponding to the de-facto fossilized humanitarian response on the ground. Despite a different nature, proximity, and unusual “familiarity” of the Ukraine war, with seemingly much bigger levels of acceptance shown towards the conflict-affected people, the representation of the crisis in the media has not undergone a critical shift, reinforcing dominant narratives historically witnessed in other conflict settings. While the Western media tend to agree that the war in Ukraine is a colonial war, pointing at the role of Russia as the coloniser, this degree projects tackles the expressions of Western neocolonialism in Ukraine’s coverage, striving to identify how the ongoing media narratives mirror the representations of conflict and disaster transplanted from other humanitarian contexts.

  • 27.
    Nilsson Mohammadi, Robert
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Remembering Racism: Prospections of an Anti-Racist Monument and Memory-Site in Malmö2023In: (Un)Contested Heritage: Archives, Museums and Publc Spaces / [ed] Cecilia Axelsson Yngvéus; Malin Thor Tureby; Ceciia Trenter, Malmö: Malmö universitet, 2023, p. 129-147Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Nilsson Mohammadi, Robert
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Education and Society (LS), Department of Society, Culture and Identity (SKI).
    Nurali Wolgast, Sima
    Lund University.
    Learning about Sharing Authority With the Gathered Voices of Malmö2023In: Oral History Review, ISSN 0094-0798, E-ISSN 1533-8592, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 206-222Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For more than two years we were involved in a collaborative process with the aim of finding out how sharing life stories could ensure “the right to the city” in Malmö, Sweden. This process led to the formation of the Gathered Voices of Malmö, an association for social justice oral history that strives to become a community archive. This article is about how sharing authority was interpreted collectively in the collaborative process when it could not be directly translated into Swedish, and how those interpretations reflect back on sharing authority as an intellectual development. Drawing upon documents created during the collaborative process and interviews with our coparticipants, we revisit what we learned, including our rereading of sharing authority’s genealogy through project-based research. As participants in, and then analysts of, that process, we learned that our trouble with translating sharing authority was not only linguistic, but also had to do with how the approach might conceal community-embedded ways of working, instead normalizing participatory practices which center research rather than community as the primary sphere in which important learnings are made. We suggest that a deeper consideration of the differences between “a shared authority” and “sharing authority” could help us avoid making participation the best practice.

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  • 29.
    Palmström, Elin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Global Political Studies (GPS).
    Etnisk tillhörighet – en konstruerad sanning: En narrativ analys av en bosnisk kvinnas krigsberättelse2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna studie behandlar fallet Bosnien, specifikt kriget i Bosnien på 90-talet och syftar till att undersöka hur social konstruktion och identitetspolitik påverkade den enskilda individens samt användes som maktmedel i Fausta Marianovics berättelse från kriget. Jag har alltså undersökt Fausta Marianovics självbiografi med Kenneth J. Gergens syn på social konstruktivism och identitetspolitik som huvudsaklig teoretisk utgångspunkt och narrativ analys med hjälp av biografiforskning som metod. I denna studie är det inte möjligt att komma fram till någon definitiv sanning men resultaten visar att den sociala konstruktionen och identitetspolitiken speglas som en stor del i vad som hände i Bosnien utifrån Fausta Marianovics berättelse samt att hennes egen upplevelse också påverkades.

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  • 30. Pierrot, Peggy
    et al.
    Snelting, Femke
    Roscam Abbing, Roel
    Modifying the universal2017In: Executing Practices / [ed] Helen Pritchard; Eric Snodgrass; Magda Tyżlik-Carver, Open Humanities Press , 2017, Vol. 33Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 31.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    How-To Discussion Forum: Museums and data power.2022Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    As an academic researcher, I have proposed that the way we celebrate metrification and numbers as measures of our work has implications in the misinformation and fake news. If we think things that have lots of likes or shares are indicators of great engagement - what are we missing out on our understanding of engagement 

  • 32.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Illustrated guideline #1: Data in the Cultural and Creative Industries (CCI)2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The one-page infographic gives a basic visual introduction to the data in cultural and creative industries. The image is available in three languages - English, Italian and Estonian. 

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    Infographic in Estonian
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    Infographic in English
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    Infographic in Italian
  • 33.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Illustrated guideline #2: Data collection methods for CCIs2022Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Illustrated guideline #2:Data collection methods for CCIs.  The one-page visual overview will give a basic introduction to cultural and creative industries to the following questions:

    1. How to collect data? What are the advantages of the various techniques?

    2. Data is everywhere, even where we don’t expect it!

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    Infographic in English: Data collection methods for CCIs
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    Infographic in Italian: Metodi di raccolta dati per le industrie culturali e creative
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    Infographic in Estonian: Andmekogumismeetodid kultuuriorganisatsioonidele
  • 34.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Illustrated guideline #3: Data-based Cultural and Creative Industry organisation2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Data-based Cultural and Creative Industry organisation. On the one-page visual guide will find answers to:

    1. Why are data-driven decisions important?

    2. What is the role of data in the organisational processes?

    3. Does data help measure impacts?

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    Infographic in English: Data-based Cultural and Creative Industry organisation
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    Infographic in italian: Gestione dell’industria culturale e creativa basata sui dati
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    Infographic in Estonian: Andmepõhine kultuuriorganisatsioon
  • 35.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    PREPARARSI ALL’IMPATTO: Can data be the secret sauce of your organisation’s impact?2022Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    The impact of CCIs, Measurement and Data: What to Choose and Where it Takes Us?2022Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The talk will give a brief overview from experiences from Me-Mind project, where we have worked with the idea of how to experience data and make culture count. Starting with the assumption that cultural and creative industries have an impact, we will discuss how we can think about data and measurement to understand that impact. Considering the challenges of identifying indicators, distinguishing between outputs and outcomes, and identifying indicators, data and data analysis opportunities, the presentation addresses briefly the questions of what is data about impact, what can be done with the data, and finally, what is needed for a creative, but also critical understanding of data about cultural industries.

  • 37.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Coli, Elena
    University of Pisa.
    CULTURAL AND CREATIVE INDUSTRIES IMPACT CANVAS2022Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    The Impact Canvas and the visualised guidelines to fill out the impact canvas are outcomes of the research project Me-Mind. The aim of these visual materials is to support the self-assessment of cultural and creative organisations to understand their potential impact and to identify the necessary data to measure the impact of a cultural and creative industry organisation.

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    The impact canvas guidelines in English
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    The impact canvas guidelines in Italian: LINEE GUIDA PER LA COMPILAZIONE DELL’IMPACT CANVAS
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    The Impact Canvas in Estonian: KULTUURI- JA LOOMESEKTORI (KLS) ORGANISATSIOONI MÕJUMUDELI LÕUEND
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    The impact canvas guidelines in Estonian KULTUURI- JA LOOMESEKTORI ORGANISATSIOONI MÕJUMUDELI LÕUENDI TÄITMISE JUHEND
    Download (pdf)
    The Impact Canvas in English
    Download (pdf)
    The Impact canvas in Italian: IMPACT CANVAS PER LE INDUSTRIE CULTURALI E CREATIVE
  • 38.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Harvard Maare, Åsa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Addo, Giuseppina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Taher, Hassan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).
    Å bruke Tingenes metode for å få publikum engasjert - hvorfor er det viktig?2023In: Tingenes metode: museenes kunnskapstopografi / [ed] Henrik Treimo, Lars Risan, Ketil Gjølme Amdersen, Marianne Løken, Torhild Skåtun, Trondheim: Museumsforlaget AS, 2023Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Pruulmann-Vengerfeldt, Pille
    et al.
    Malmö University, Data Society. Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3). Malmö University.
    Runnel, Pille
    Estonian National Museum Estonia.
    Producing a Media-Rich Permanent Exhibition for the Estonian National Museum as Arts-Based research2021In: Comunicazioni Sociali, ISSN 0392-8667, no 1, p. 128-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores how academic and arts-based research have been combined in curating the contemporary, media-rich exhibition The Time of Freedoms, which is part of the permanent exhibition of the Estonian National Museum. The article shows how the success of exhibition-making practice depends on the skill of switching codes from the more strictly procedure-oriented sociological/ethnological, to an arts-based approach that relies on being processual and performative. After contextualizing the exhibition and positioning the curatorial team, the article discusses three parts/exhibits of The Time of Freedoms exhibition: The Sacrifice Stone and ATM, the Synthesiser of Freedom and the Stories about Freedom. These vignettes are then used to discuss the roles of arts-based research in this exhibition design process and outcome.

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  • 40.
    Rattajova, Linda
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Workplace Coaching and Facilitation of Stress-Management and Well-being in Slovakia2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The research explored when workplace coaching can facilitate stress management and well-being in corporations in Slovakia. It looked at the challenges and opportunities of workplace coaching through individual and organisational perspectives. It was found that masculine and directive leadership style is present in the organisations. There is an observed lack of leaders’ engagement and interest in employee well-being throughout the organisational culture. Furthermore, some organisation members lack healthy assertiveness and motivation which affect their willingness to change and participate consistently in coaching. The opportunities revealed that the coaching could facilitate stress management and well-being when the alignment and positive collaborative intervention between the coach, coachee and organisational culture occurs. Workplace coaching provides members with practical tools that directly affect employees' stress levels, such as deep self-reflection, meaning-making, value-reflective coaching, mindfulness and somatic techniques. The study indicated that coaching helps develop self-awareness, self-regulation and self-knowledge, which are vital abilities for the sustainable well-being of employees. From an organisational perspective, the employees need to be motivated and supported to integrate the coaching techniques into daily corporate life. The research suggests that coaching, authentic and transformational leadership style and the traits and abilities of emotional intelligence (e.g. adaptability, emotional resiliency, self-awareness, self-motivation, self-worth, social awareness and management) sustain and foster well-being in the workplace. Employees’ engagement and promotion of well-being by the leaders seem to be critical aspects. An integrated narrative-collaborative approach to communication is vital, and the development of strategic well-being measurements and indicators is suggested. The qualitative research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with female coaches who are experts in stress management and well-being. They offered their perspectives on their expertise and working experience with international corporations in Slovakia. 

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  • 41.
    Roscam Abbing, Roel
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Diehm, Cade
    The New Design Congress, New York City, United States.
    Warreth, Shahed
    Cyber Threats Research Centre, Swansea University, Swansea, Wales, UK.
    Decentralised social media2023In: Internet Policy Review, E-ISSN 2197-6775, Vol. 12, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social media platforms allow users to create digital identities, interact with other users, post and discover content. On mainstream social media platforms, aspects of the platform are centralised under the control of one umbrella. Decentralised social media are designed around the distribution of one or more aspects required to make social media function. Architecturally, these are data storage, content distribution, discovery, identity mechanisms and networking topology. Socially, these are their governance and revenue models. This article identifies and discusses three general types of decentralised social media grouped by architecture: federated, peer-to-peer, blockchain-based. Examples of each are discussed, along with a general description of their functioning and governance. Finally, the entry provides a general discussion of the drivers and issues around decentralised social media. 

  • 42.
    Samzelius, Tove
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA).
    Lidandet som etisk drivkraft2023In: Brandtal / [ed] Susana Alakoski, Magnus Dahlstedt, Malmö: Bokförlaget Atlas, 2023, 1, p. 183-187Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 43.
    Sandelin, Erik
    et al.
    Konstfack, University of Arts, Craft and Design.
    Westerlaken, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Collaborative Future Making (CFM). Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    After the Revolution: Prototyping Post-Speciesist Futures2019In: Rethinking revolution: Nonhuman animals, antispeciesism, and power, 2019, p. 92-92Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What could a post-speciesist world be like?

    Critical Animal Studies activists and scholars have developed convincing counter-arguments to speciesism and animal oppression. These arguments are continuously developed and reshaped through contributions from fields like gender studies, postcolonialism, environmental humanities, and philosophy. This broad range of approaches makes for an diverse and growing body of knowledge on the systematic discrimination, exploitation, and oppression of nonhuman animals, not least regarding the treatment of animals today and in the past. We argue, however, that this knowledge production is significantly more sporadic when it comes to constructive proposals of less speciesist futures. Where are the snapshots from potential futures, and alternative presents, where human-animal relations are radically reconfigured?

    We suggest that in working towards an anti-speciesist revolution we need to also be able to imagine what living in a post-speciesist society could be like; and explore creative tactics for bringing these material propositions into being.

    These kinds of speculations and constructions of scenarios involve future-oriented contributions from fields such as the arts, design, literature, architecture, and speculative philosophy. In other words, domains that are engaged with envisioning, prototyping, and rehearsing potential futures and alternative presents. In this paper, we discuss a number of works that in different ways materialise reconfigured relations between humans and other species. Examples include utopian artworks by Hartmut Kievert, Ursula Le Guin’s ecofeminist stories, as well as our own design projects on sketching already existing post-speciesist animal-human encounters and redesigning recreational fishing practices. We discuss what tactics are employed by the creators and how their designerly approaches might help in generating new ideas about possible futures. We also introduce and reflect on tools and practices from the design disciplines, such as sketching, prototyping, and design fiction that can be of use for CAS scholar-activists.

    Importantly, an affirmative approach of imagining post-speciesist futures does not come without risk. It can be argued that constructive, at times hopeful, projects distract from militating against the currently dim situation that billions of animals face daily. It can also be argued that we are nowhere near attaining a world that can be considered hopeful for most animals on our planet. Shouldn’t we focus on bringing about the revolution before speculating on its aftermath?

    We argue that research and activism against speciesism ought to be complemented by constructive scenarios for post-speciesist futures. We seek to contribute to the field of Critical Animal Studies by calling for and articulating a stronger speculative and imaginative strand of CAS, without blunting the urgency and critical edge of the field.

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  • 44.
    Schröder, Anna Marie
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Getting in Touch With Seaweed: Exploring a Non-Exploitative Relationship With a More-Than-Human Actor Through Design Research2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 14 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Through human over-exploitation of nature, more and more ocean species approach ecological tipping points. On the other hand, more and more people suffer from climate anxiety. This thesis study explored an alternative relationship between humans and marine seaweed species through design research. Situated in posthumanist design, affirmative ethics, and kinship relations, the study experimented with non-exploitative human-seaweed encounters to stimulate reflection on the predominant perception of ocean species as resources for human use. By drifting through five design experiments, the study first investigated the current human- seaweed relationship at Ribersborg beach in Malmö and then invited participants to encounter seaweed from different perspectives in several interactive workshops. As the research study swayed through several threads of theory and practice, it found a prevalent distant stance towards seaweed. While participants who engaged in attentive interaction with seaweed showed an increased curiosity for the often- overlooked species group, the study found that an interdependency between humans and seaweed was either not perceived or negatively associated. Designerly speculation led to a performance of kinship rituals to encounter this vulnerability, which allowed room for reflection on current and future ways of being with seaweed in non-exploitative ways. The trialed practices of affirmative ethics involved human participants in coming up with these practices, which is of meaning in the further search for restoring the human relationship to nature through design.

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  • 45.
    Skopelitou, Stella
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Criminology (KR).
    Via Budo: Using the warrior's mind against crime2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional martial arts are thought to be a path towards virtue through the practice of self-control. In this study, a survey was used to examine the associations between the practice of traditional martial arts, higher levels of self-control and lower levels of aggression, which were already suggested from previous research. The hypothesis was based both on self-control and social bonds theories as well as theories based on morality. The philosophical concept of t.m.a, which is thought to encourage individuals to practise discipline in the pursuit of virtue, was assumed to have contributed to the survey's results. Further research should examine traditional martial arts' potential in both crime (and recidivism) prevention as well as rehabilitation.

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  • 46.
    Sosso, Lorenzo
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Towards Selfishness and 'Materiality': A diachronic study on the evolution of pop music lyrics in America (from 1970 to 2020)2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts), 14 HE creditsStudent thesis
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  • 47.
    Storm, Joe
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), Department of Urban Studies (US).
    Terrestrial Reorientation of Managing - Blockchain Projects - for Sustainability2022Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is a post qualitative inquiry that explores a different research approach concerning climate change and what Bruno Latour calls the Terrestrial. We are now living in a New Climatic Regime or locked-down age, according to Latour, where life continues – yet is ever more suspended and disorienting. This frozen image of modern life is drawn in our new landscape – that is political, organizational and it concerns terrestrial sustainability – along with an emerging worldview (of Gaia) that is challenging to understand and manage for. It also reorients how we are managing sustainability and what we connect to it. This new landscape – that is also a mapping of dominant trajectories for organizing and Terrestrial reorientation with the world – is traversed, extended, and explored with two blockchain projects for sustainability. The projects are organizing their own currency for putting-on-chain, tokenizing, or attaching to nature, carbon and other actors. The key coordinates and blockages of this new landscape for sustainability are also drawn from these two cases – mapping their organizing trajectories and Terrestrial reorientation. The research and writing of this inquiry gathers with Terrestrial earth-bound movement for managing, living and organizing in connection with the common world for habitability.

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  • 48.
    Stougaard Pedersen, Birgitte
    et al.
    Aarhus university.
    Engberg, Maria
    Malmö University, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT). Malmö University, Data Society.
    Have, Iben
    Aarhus University.
    Quist Henkel, Ayoe
    Via University College, Aarhus University.
    Mygind, Sarah
    Aarhus University.
    Bundgaard Svendsen, Helle
    VIA University College, Aarhus University.
    To Move, to Touch, to Listen: Multisensory Aspects of the Digital Reading Condition2021In: Poetics today, ISSN 0333-5372, E-ISSN 1527-5507, Vol. 42, no 2, p. 281-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses modes of reading that emerge from reading situationsthat involve literary digital interfaces and digital audiobooks. Building onanalyses of sensorial characteristics of the act of reading a digital audiobook and aliterary digital app, respectively, the article presents and defines the concept of multisensoryreading. This concept emphasizes the literary work’s material and performative features, as well as the experienced reading situation. The authors explore how the digital literary interface changes reading situations and argue that newreading habits create a need to renegotiate what it means to read in a digital age.In particular, sensory aspects can be understood as integrally involved in what theyterm the digital reading condition.

  • 49.
    Suros, Carlota
    Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).
    Constructing sexual danger in the Spanish media: A mixed-method analysis of a high-profile, non-intimate femicide case in El País2021Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    From January 2016 until August 2021, at least 436 women or girls have been deliberately murdered in Spain by men. Non-intimate femicide (and, particularly, murder committed by complete strangers to the victim, to which this study refers as “stranger femicide”) has historically been, and still is, the most covered type of femicide in the media. This is also the case in the Spanish press, and more specifically, El País, the most read media outlet in the country.

    This thesis examines how El País framed Diana Quer’s case, the most high-profile, intensively covered femicide case in Spain in the past 5 years. It will also examine which ethical problems the reporting presented. From a feminist perspective and through a mixed-method approach of content analysis and frame analysis, this study examines 86 articles corresponding to the two informative peaks of Diana Quer’s case coverage. The periods go from August to October 2016, the first two months of her disappearance, and from December 2017 to January 2018, the 15 days following her killer’s arrest and crime confession. The findings reveal that the coverage in El País constructed a victimization iconography with DQ’s case that engendered cautionary tales and failed to address femicide as a social issue. The reporting also presented a series of critical ethical problems calling for a reformation of femicide reporting guidelines.

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  • 50.
    Trenter, Cecilia
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för kulturvetenskaper (KV).
    Bara Charlotte Kalla har bärnsten i blick...2014In: Aftonbladet, ISSN 1103-9000Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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