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  • 1.
    Backström, Martin Karaba
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden..
    de Castro, Andre Luiz Moura
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Eakman, Aaron M.
    Colorado State Univ, Dept Occupat Therapy, Ft Collins, CO USA..
    Ikiugu, Moses N.
    Univ South Dakota, Sch Hlth Sci, Occupat Therapy Dept, Vermillion, SD USA..
    Gribble, Nigel
    Curtin Univ, Sch Allied Hlth, Bentley, Australia..
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Huddinge, Sweden.;Stockholms Sjukhem, Unit Res Educ Dev & Innovat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Falkmer, Olov
    Humdrum, Perth, Australia..
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Ness, Nils Erik
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, Occupat Therapy Programme, Trondheim, Norway..
    Balogh, Stefan
    Bosse Rad, Stod & Kunskapsctr, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hynes, Patrick
    St Gabriels Fdn, Limerick, Ireland.;Univ Limerick, Sch Allied Hlth, Limerick, Ireland..
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Lund Univ, Fac Med, Lund, Sweden..
    Occupational therapy gender imbalance; revisiting a lingering issue2023In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 1113-1121Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Recently, it has been suggested that gender disparity in Occupational Therapy has to do with segregated gendered job norms that position female dominated professions as a 'step down' for many males. Interestingly, this suggestion was not underpinned by experiences of males in the profession.

    Aims and methods: Thirteen male Occupational Therapists with a variety of backgrounds were invited to this Round Table research, focussing on the broader issue of the existing gender imbalance in Occupational Therapy.

    Results: Two themes emerged: 'The core values of the profession', and 'Broadening the scope of the profession'; none of them suggesting that male/female imbalance was necessarily the most pressing issue.

    Conclusions: A gender-unrelated approach to everyday problem-solving was put forward to achieve increased diversity in Occupational Therapists' backgrounds, better reflecting the people they serve. By broadening the scope and the way the profession is presented, and encouraging innovative and more entrepreneurially driven approaches, diversity in the workforce could be further facilitated. These findings are discussed within the context of 'The mutual constitution of cultures and selves' model.

    Significance: Diversity in the Occupational therapy workforce could be further facilitated with a shift in focus away from the male/female perspective to an intersectional approach.

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  • 2. Ballmer, Thomas
    et al.
    Helle, Tina
    Kaptain, Rina Juel
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Test-retest and inter-rater reliability of the Danish version of the management of everday technology assessment for use with older adults with and without COPD2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 463-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The trend towards telemedicine increasingly requires clients to manage everyday technology (ET) to access and use health services. The Management of Everday Technology Assessment (META) is an observation-based instrument developed to evaluate the ability to manage ET. AIM: To examine test-retest (TRR) and inter-rater reliability (IRR) of the Danish translation of the META for older adults with and without COPD. METHOD AND MATERIALS: 47 older adults with COPD (n = 23) and without (n = 24) were recruited. IRR was examined by four raters paired across 30 participants. TRR was examined for 21 participants by the same rater administering the META twice within four weeks. A rank-based method for paired ordinal data was used to calculate percentage agreement (PA) and measures of systematic disagreement and individual variability. Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare PA to health status (presence/absence of COPD). RESULTS: Inter-rater PA was acceptable across 10 of 11 items and test-retest PA across 8 of 11 items. Systematic disagreement was present for one item in TRR. No significant differences in PA were found regarding health status. CONCLUSION: The Danish META generates reliable scores for this sample. However, conclusive statements cannot be made for all items.

  • 3.
    Gaber, S. N.
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Nygård, L.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Malinowsky, C.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Brorsson, A.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Hedman, A.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Research and Development, FoU Nordost, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Enacting citizenship through participation in a technological society: A longitudinal three-year study among people with dementia in Sweden2023In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779, Vol. 43, no 2, p. 276-297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The role of Everyday Technology (ET) use is presented as subsidiary or neutral in policy for age- and dementia-friendly communities; and yet, research suggests that older people, especially those with dementia, experience increased challenges using ET in their everyday lives. Through the lens of micro-citizenship, the study aims to deepen the knowledge about how use of ET outside the home, including portable ETs, relates to participation in places visited within public space among people with dementia over time. Using a longitudinal study design, 35 people with dementia were recruited at baseline and followed over three years. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews using standardised questionnaires: the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home Questionnaire (ACT-OUT) and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (ETUQ). Random intercept modelling and descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Throughout the three-year study, decreasing use of ET outside the home, including portable ETs, was associated with decreasing participation in places visited within public space, in a statistically significant way when controlling for age (F = 7.59, p = 0.01). The findings indicate that facilitating access and use of ET outside the home, among people with dementia, should be integral to promoting and maintaining participation in age- and dementia-friendly communities. Copyright © The Author(s), 2021. Published by Cambridge University Press.

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  • 4.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Marie Cederschiöld University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nygård, Louise
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brorsson, Anna
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    Research Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, UCL, United Kingdom.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Stockholm Gerontology Research Centre, Sweden.
    Malinowsky, Camilla Walles
    Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Social participation and everyday technology use: A mixed-methods study among people living with and without dementia2022In: Improving the Lives of People with Dementia through Technology: Interdisciplinary Network for Dementia Utilising Current Technology / [ed] Martin Orrell, Déborah Oliveira, Orii McDermott, Frans R. J. Verhey, Fania C. M. Dassen, Rose-Marie Dröes, Routledge, 2022, p. 56-70Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social participation is a modifiable determinant for health and well-being among older people; however, social participation is increasingly dependent on technology use. This study investigated social participation in relation to Everyday Technology (ET) use and social deprivation of the living environment among older people with and without dementia in the United Kingdom. Sixty-four older people living with dementia and 64 older people without dementia were interviewed using The Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home Questionnaire and Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire. A mixed-methods approach integrated statistical analyses and content analysis of free-text responses. Small, statistically significant positive associations were found between social participation and ET use outside home, for participants with dementia (Rs = 0.247; p = 0.049) and without dementia (Rs = 0.343; p = 0.006). A small statistically significant positive association was identified between social participation and the index of multiple deprivation in the living environment, among only participants living with dementia (Rs = 0.267, p = 0.033). The content analysis and graphical joint display revealed motivators, considerations that require extra attention, and strategies for managing social participation in relation to ET use. The mixed-methods synthesis revealed a nuanced view of ETs, as both useful in not only planning and preparatory activities but also challenging for social participation.

  • 5.
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Everyday technologies and public space participation among people with and without dementia2019In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 400-411Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Occupational therapists support everyday technology use; however, it is necessary to consider the challenges that people with dementia encounter with everyday technologies when participating in various places within public space. Purpose. The purpose of the study was to explore stability and change in participation in places visited within public space in relation to the relevance of everyday technologies used within public space. Method. People with dementia (n = 35) and people with no known cognitive impairment (n = 34) were interviewed using the Participation in Activities and Places Outside Home Questionnaire and the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire. Data analysis used modern and classical test theory. Findings. Both samples participated in places within public space; however, participation and relevance of everyday technologies were significantly lower for the dementia group.

  • 6.
    Hahn, Bridget
    et al.
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Fisher, Heidi
    University of Illinois Chicago, USA.
    Hansen, Piper
    Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Feasibility of Increasing Occupation-Based Assessment Using the Knowledge to Action Framework2023In: OTJR (Thorofare, N.J.), ISSN 1539-4492, E-ISSN 1938-2383, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 645-654, article id 15394492221137377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS) is a standardized occupation-based measure; however, barriers often limit use in practice. The Knowledge to Action Framework (KTA) is one of the most widely used implementation approaches to induce practice change. The objective of the study is to examine the feasibility and acceptability of a KTA-informed intervention to increase the use of the AMPS. AMPS-trained occupational therapists were recruited through convenience sampling. Interventions included workshops, action planning, goal setting, peer support, and organizational resources. Recruitment and retention were tracked. Pre- and post-survey results of interventions’ helpfulness, AMPS behaviors, and motivational changes informed acceptability. Participants (n = 5) rated 7/7 (100%) intervention strategies as helpful, reported decreased barriers and increased frequency of AMPS administration, increased resources for AMPS implementation, and improved compatibility with practice. Implementation of a KTA-informed intervention to increase AMPS practice was feasible and supported by environmental changes and peer support in a physical rehabilitation setting. 

  • 7.
    Helle, Tina
    et al.
    University College North, Aalborg, Denmark; Karolinska Institutet.
    Joho, Tanja
    Amsterdam University of Applied Sciences, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Kaptain, Rina Juel
    University College North, Aalborg, Denmark; Karolinska Institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Karolinska Institutet.
    Activity repertoires and time use in people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 7, p. 564-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Understanding the dynamics and aspects of how activity choices impact health and well-being in people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is important to inform rehabilitation. Aim:To describe, firstly, how much time people living with COPD spend on work, daily living tasks, recreation and rest; secondly, how this population perceived competence, importance and enjoyment related to these activities; thirdly, if differences in such perceptions and time use were associated with the living situation and COPD severity. Material and methods:This cross-sectional study involved 76 participants (+45 years, COPD, living in ordinary homes), who completed the Occupational Questionnaire (OQ). Descriptive statistics and group comparisons were performed. Results:Most of the participants' time were spent on daily living activities and recreational activities. Participants spent approx. 80% of their recorded time in OQ on activities they valued, enjoyed and in which they felt competent. Participants living alone scored significantly lower on enjoyment in restful activities than those living in couples (p < 0.05). No statistically significant difference in perceived competence, importance or enjoyment was found in relation to COPD severity. Conclusions and significance:Findings underscore the importance of targeting overall daily activity repertoires including compositions of activity types, time use and perceived competence, importance and enjoyment.

  • 8.
    Jakobsson, Elin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Olsson, Cecilia Brakenhielm
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Institutet.
    The use of everyday technology; a comparison of older persons with cognitive impairments' self-reports and their proxies' reports2021In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 84, no 7, p. 446-455, article id 0308022620954117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Older persons with cognitive impairment have often been disregarded in providing information on their own perceptions. This study explored the number of relevant everyday technologies and the ability to use everyday technologies as perceived by persons with cognitive impairment in comparison with their proxies' estimates using the Short Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire. Method In this cross-sectional study, persons with cognitive impairment (n = 21) and their proxies (n = 21) were interviewed on separate occasions with the Short Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, which measures the number of relevant everyday technologies and the ability to use everyday technologies. The data were analysed with t-tests, z-comparisons, and Fisher's exact test. The level of significance was set at p < 0.05. Results At the group level, no significant differences were found between persons with cognitive impairments' perceptions and their proxies' estimates regarding the number of relevant everyday technologies or the ability to use everyday technologies. On the individual level, significant differences were found in the ability measures within four out of the 21 dyads. Conclusion The persons with cognitive impairment and their proxies verified each other's responses, providing evidence that persons with cognitive impairment should be the primary source for information about their own everyday technology use.

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  • 9.
    Kaptain, Rina Juel
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helle, Tina
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patomella, Ann-Helen
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Juggling the management of everyday life activities in persons living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease2022In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 44, no 14, p. 3410-3421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Evidence regarding everyday life activities in people living with COPD is limited. Such evidence can improve our understanding when designing interventions for pulmonary rehabilitation that aim at increasing or maintaining participation in these activities. The aim of this study was to describe how people living with COPD experience and manage everyday life activities.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS: The sample comprised four males and four females with an age ranging from 65-87 years. Participants were interviewed in their own homes regarding experiences of performing and managing everyday life activities. Data were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis.

    RESULTS: Findings from this study comprised the theme "Juggling to manage everyday life activities with COPD" and three categories representing the elements of this theme: (1) consequences of COPD symptoms, (2) adjustment of activities, and (3) contextual aspects.

    CONCLUSION: This study found the participants with COPD juggling the management of everyday life activities. The juggle generated a manageable daily life, which came at the expense of making deliberate choices and prioritizing everyday life activities that were necessary for participation in valued and engaging activities in order to maintain health and well-being. Implications for Rehabilitation People living with COPD experience a complex juggling between the consequences of COPD symptoms and contextual aspects when managing everyday life activities. The participants had largely accepted their disease and adjusted to their situation. The disease was still described as frustrating and generated less focus on making deliberate choices and prioritizing everyday life activities that are necessary for participation in valued and engaging activities. Health professionals need to support people living with COPD in making deliberate choices in order to continue participating in valued and engaging everyday life activities as they affect health and well-being. Pulmonary rehabilitation should focus more on supporting participation in social relations and on using everyday technologies.

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  • 10.
    Kaptain, Rina Juel
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Helle, Tina
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University College of Northern Denmark, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Patomella, Ann-Helen
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weinreich, Ulla Møller
    Department of Respiratory Diseases, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; The Clinical Institute, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    New Insights into Activities of Daily Living Performance in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease2021In: The International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, ISSN 1176-9106, E-ISSN 1178-2005, Vol. 16, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There have been calls for more knowledge of activities of daily living (ADL) performance in order to address interventions in pulmonary rehabilitation effectively. Everyday technology (ET) has become an integrated dimension of ADL, impacting the ways in which ADL is performed. To improve everyday functioning and quality of life, the use of ADL and ET use needs to be evaluated and addressed effectively in interventions. Therefore, the aim of this study was twofold: 1) to explore the quality of ADL performance, and 2) to investigate the relationship between observation and self-reported ADL performance and ability to use everyday technologies in people living with COPD.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 84 participants aged 46-87 years. Participants were recruited through healthcare centres in the Northern Region of Denmark using a convenience sampling procedure. Data were collected using standardized assessments that investigated different ADL perspectives: self-reported ADL tasks and ET use, observed motor and process ability, and need for assistance. Data were analysed and presented using descriptive statistics and Pearson's correlation coefficient.

    Results: The most affected ADL tasks were mobility within or outside the home, lower dressing, bathing, pedicuring, cooking, shopping, cleaning and washing clothes. New insights into the quality of ADL performance in people living with COPD were presented in terms of detailed ADL motor skills and ADL process skills, as well as the predicted need for support to function in the community. Moreover, new insights into the relationship between observation and self-reported ADL performance (r=0.546, p<0.01; r=0.297, p<0.01) and between ADL performance and self-perceived ability to use ET (r=0.524, p<0.01; r=0.273, p<0.05; r=0.044, p=0.692) were presented.

    Conclusion: Overall, the knowledge from the present study is valuable for focusing interventions that address challenging ADL performance and ET use through relevant and realistic activities. The ability to use ET is important to evaluate and target pulmonary rehabilitation.

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  • 11.
    Kottorp, Anders
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Killian, Catherine
    Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL..
    Duke, Kathryn
    Occupational Therapy Programs, West Coast University, Center for Graduate Studies, Los Angeles, CA..
    Leggett, Caniece
    Franciscan Health, Olympia Fields, IL.; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    Drasga, Ruxandra
    Community First Medical Center, Chicago, IL.; Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    Preissner, Katharine
    Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Applied Health Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago..
    The Revised American Occupational Therapy Association Fieldwork Performance Evaluations: Evaluation of Internal Structure, Response Processes, and Precision—Part 22023In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 77, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: There is an evidence-based need to assess the validity and reliability/precision of the revised American Occupational Therapy Association’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation (FWPE) items for the occupational therapy student (OTS) and the occupational therapy assistant student (OTAS).

    Objective: To evaluate evidence of validity in relation to response processes, internal structure, and precision of the FWPEs.

    Design: Cross-sectional study design.

    Setting: OTS and OTAS fieldwork practice settings, United States.

    Participants: Two hundred sixty-seven fieldwork educators participated in total, providing 228 OTS evaluations and 39 OTAS evaluations.

    Outcomes and Measures: A Rasch model was used to evaluate aspects of validity and precision.

    Results: The rating scales provided evidence of the tools’ overall validity. Thirty-two of 37 items on the FWPE for the OTS, and 27 of 31 items on the FWPE for the OTAS demonstrated acceptable fit, but the evidence of unidimensionality in the subscales and in the total scales was not fully supported. The total/reduced FWPE scales were able to separate students into at least four distinct groups of fieldwork performance. The relationships between the current and revised FWPEs indicate that the new scales measure different but related constructs of student fieldwork performance, compared with the current version.

    Conclusions and Relevance: The findings support that the revised FWPEs for the OTS and OTAS demonstrate preliminary evidence of internal structure, response processes, and precision, supporting evidence-based practice in fieldwork evaluations.

    What This Article Adds: This article highlights evidence demonstrating the validity and precision of the revised American Occupational Therapy Association’s Fieldwork Performance Evaluation items and supports academic and fieldwork settings for occupational therapy students and occupational therapy assistant students.

  • 12. Köttl, Hanna
    et al.
    Fallahpour, Mandana
    Hedman, Annicka
    Nygård, Louise
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Depression, everyday technology use and life satisfaction in older adults with cognitive impairments: a cross-sectional exploratory study2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 233-243Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    RATIONAL: Life satisfaction is strongly associated with participation in everyday life activities. Yet, older adults with cognitive impairments have been found to experience difficulties in accessing and engaging in more complex everyday activities, especially, if these involve everyday technology. Considering the rapidly advancing technological landscape, this may substantially affect individuals' life satisfaction and their participation in meaningful community-based and home-based activities.

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore the associations between life satisfaction, ability to use everyday technology and number of relevant everyday technologies used in older adults (n = 117) with and without mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). It also aimed to understand the role of depression, activity involvement and diagnosis regarding life satisfaction in this sample.

    METHOD: Descriptive statistics, Mann-Whitney U tests and t-tests were applied to compare those satisfied and those dissatisfied with life regarding ability to use everyday technology and number of relevant everyday technologies used.

    FINDINGS: The number of relevant community-based everyday technologies currently not used was significantly associated with being dissatisfied with life (p < 0.05). Further, depression and withdrawal from activities and interests significantly differed across life satisfaction groups, while no group differences were found regarding overall number of everyday technologies in use and ability to use everyday technology.

    CONCLUSION: Attention from healthcare professionals and researchers to early withdrawal from activities that rely on community-based everyday technologies is called for, especially in older adults with depression. Preventing everyday technology-related barriers in community life may increase life satisfaction.

  • 13. Malinowsky, Camilla
    et al.
    Nygård, Louise
    Pantzar, Monica
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Test-retest reliability of the short version of the everyday technology use questionnaire (S-ETUQ).2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 567-576Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Everyday technologies (ET) such as smart phones, and internet banking are increasingly incorporated into daily activities. Therefore, valid assessments are needed to identify ability in ET use and to design and evaluate interventions.

    Aims: To evaluate and compare the stability over time (test-retest reliability) of measures generated with the short version of the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire (S-ETUQ) in older adults with cognitive impairment or mild dementia.

    Materials and Methods: Data was collected with S-ETUQ at two occasions (m = 20.9 days in between) in a sample of (n = 73) older adults with cognitive impairment of different origin (n = 38) or mild dementia (n = 35). Stability of each participant’s S-ETUQ measure was examined using standardised difference z-comparisons. The test-retest reliability coefficient of the S-ETUQ measures was determined by Intraclass Correlation Coefficients. Comparisons were performed using Mann-Whitney u-tests.

    Results: The S-ETUQ measures were statistically stable between the two occasions. Hence, the group of persons with cognitive impairment demonstrated slightly higher stability and fewer differences compared to the group with mild dementia. The ICCs (0.82–0.90) indicated good to excellent agreement.

    Conclusions: S- ETUQ can be used with older people with cognitive impairments of varying degree to gather reliable and precise information regarding their use of ET.

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  • 14.
    Margot-Cattin, Isabel
    et al.
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland HES SO, Sch Social Work & Hlth HETSL, Dept Occupat Therapy, Lausanne, Switzerland; Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ludwig, Catherine
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland, HES SO, Geneva Sch Hlth Sci, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Kuhne, Nicolas
    Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland HES SO, Sch Social Work & Hlth HETSL, Dept Occupat Therapy, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Eriksson, Gunilla
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Berchtold, Andre
    Lausanne Univ UNIL, Fac Social & Polit Sci, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Div Occupat Therapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Visiting Out-of-Home Places when Living with Dementia2021In: Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy / Revue Canadienne d`Ergotèrapie, ISSN 0008-4174, Vol. 88, no 2, p. 131-141, article id 00084174211000595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Persons living with dementia face a reduction of their life space outside home and disengagement from participation, linked to places visited. Purpose. This study explored stability and change in perceived participation in places visited outside home and its relationship with occupational gaps among older adults. Method. Older adults living with (n = 35) or without (n = 35) dementia were interviewed using the Participation in ACTivities and Places OUTside Home (ACT-OUT) questionnaire and the Occupational Gaps Questionnaire (OGQ). Data analysis used descriptive and inferential statistics. Findings. The group of people living with dementia reported significantly fewer places (p < .001) visited than the comparison group and having abandoned more places visited (p < .001) than the comparison group. The number of occupational gaps was significantly different between groups (p < .001). Implications. Participation outside home is not influenced in a uniform and straightforward way for persons living with dementia; the shrinking world effect appears differently in relation to types of places.

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  • 15. Mirza, Mansha
    et al.
    Gecht-Silver, Maureen
    Keating, Emily
    Krischer, Amy
    Kim, Hajwa
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Feasibility and Preliminary Efficacy of an Occupational Therapy Intervention for Older Adults With Chronic Conditions in a Primary Care Clinic2020In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 74, no 5, article id 7405205030Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Importance: Occupational therapy can play a role in primary care management of chronic diseases among older adults. Objective: To assess the feasibility of delivering a primary care occupation-focused intervention (Integrated PRimary care and Occupational therapy for Aging and Chronic disease Treatment to preserve Independence and Functioning, or i-PROACTIF) for older adults with chronic disease. Design: Feasibility study comparing i-PROACTIF with complex care management using a two-group randomized controlled trial design with data gathered at baseline and during and after the 8-wk intervention. Setting: Family medicine clinic serving an urban, low-income, working-class community. Outcomes and Measures: Feasibility indicators were recruitment, retention, utility of clinical assessments, and acceptability of interventions assessed through feedback surveys completed by patients and primary care providers (PCPs). Patient outcomes, including perspectives on chronic illness care, occupational performance, and overall well-being, were collected using standardized, validated measures and analyzed descriptively. Participants: Eighteen adult volunteers, ages X50 yr, with heart disease, arthritis, and uncontrolled diabetes completed the study. Ten PCPs completed feedback surveys. Intervention: i-PROACTIF focuses on preserving functional independence, is based on the Person-Environment-Occupation framework, and consists of two assessment sessions and six weekly treatment sessions. Results: Recruitment goals were achieved, with an 86% retention rate. Clinical measures unearthed deficits in areas that were unreported or underreported by patients. Participants reported being extremely satisfied with the intervention. Physicians and nurses also supported the intervention. Both groups showed improved scores on most outcomes. Conclusion and Relevance: Delivering and evaluating i-PROACTIF was feasible and acceptable. Future efficacy trials are needed before it can be used in clinical settings. What This Article Adds: The results of this study can inform future occupational therapy interventions and clinical trials in primary care for older adults with chronic conditions.

  • 16.
    Preissner, Katharine
    et al.
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois Chicago, Chicago, United States.
    Duke, Kathryn Bernice
    Occupational Therapy Department, West Coast University, Los Angeles, CA, United States.
    Killian, Catherine
    Occupational Therapy Program, Midwestern University, Downers Grove, IL, United States.
    Ouyang, Rachel Luangdilok
    Fox Rehabilitation, Westmont, IL, United States.
    Jarek, Eva D
    Community Physical Therapy, Chicago, United States.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The Revised American Occupational Therapy Association Fieldwork Performance Evaluations: Evaluation of Content Validity-Part 12020In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 74, no 6, article id 7406205090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    IMPORTANCE: Occupational therapy education and practice has changed over time; however, items on the American Occupational Therapy Association's (AOTA's) Fieldwork Performance Evaluations (FWPEs) for the Occupational Therapy Student (OTS) and Occupational Therapy Assistant Student (OTAS) have not been updated in more than two decades.

    OBJECTIVE: To explore evidence of validity in relation to test content of the revised FWPEs for the OTS and OTAS.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study using cognitive interviews was conducted to gather perspectives on the revised FWPEs, including updated items and a proposed rating scale. A content analysis approach was used to link patterns in responses to stable, meaningful constructs to further align and refine content of the tool before further validation.

    SETTING: Fieldwork sites and academic settings.

    PARTICIPANTS: Eighteen fieldwork educators (FWEs) and academic fieldwork coordinators.

    RESULTS: Seven areas for refinement were identified: (1) relevance to a variety of practice settings, (2) overlapping and redundant items, (3) long item statements, (4) double- and triple-barreled item statements, (5) alignment between OTS and OTAS items, (6) further alignment with AOTA and Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education documents and contemporary practice, and (7) wording and features of the proposed rating scale. The findings guided revisions of FWPE content.

    CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cognitive interviewing was a critical step in refining the FWPE items to support content validity. The issues identified may not have been detected using traditional approaches to survey development and therefore were critical in maximizing the validity and usefulness of the final items, which will ultimately benefit fieldwork educators and students.

    WHAT THIS ARTICLE ADDS: This study resulted in refinements to FWPE items before the next step in the validation process, ultimately improving the final FWPE items. In addition, this article outlines a process that other researchers can use to validate similar tools.

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  • 17. Ryd, Charlotta
    et al.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Öhman, Annika
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Nygård, Louise
    Older adults' experiences of daily life occupations as everyday technology changes2018In: British Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0308-0226, E-ISSN 1477-6006, Vol. 81, no 10, p. 601-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Knowledge is lacking of how technological development has affected occupational engagement and performance. Changes in the environment, for example, new technology, are likely to create changes in the dynamics of occupations and exploring this among older adults is especially important. This study aimed to explore what can drive and hinder the incorporation of everyday technology into occupations and how new technology affects occupational engagement and performance among older adults. Method A constructivist grounded theory methodology was applied. Data were collected by individual interviews with six women and five men between the ages of 67 and 92 years old. Participants also varied as regards their cognitive function and living conditions. Results The findings concerned the match between technology and the participants' perceptions of occupational purposes, needs of control and safety, and the kind of technology user they strived to be. A good match was a driving force for technology usage and satisfaction with the altered occupations and vice versa. Conclusion Occupational engagement and performance in relation to technology use can be facilitated, which is useful knowledge for stakeholders developing and implementing new technology, as well as those who encounter older adults with the needs or desire to use technology in their daily occupations.

  • 18.
    Schulze, Christina
    et al.
    School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Science, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Meichtry, Andre
    School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Science, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Page, Julie
    School of Health Professions, Zurich University of Applied Science, Winterthur, Switzerland.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Psychometric properties of the German Version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-G): A factor analysis2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 28, no 8, p. 621-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Activities of daily living (ADL) are crucial for children because they enable them to participate in everyday life. For the evaluation of children`s ADL performance, health professionals such as occupational therapists use standardized ADL assessments. To implement assessments into practice it is important that the score generated from an assessment can be viewed as a unidimensional measure. Aim: To investigate the factor structure of the German Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-G) in a sample of typically developing children and children with an impairment. Material and Methods: An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with factor rotation was performed to assess the factor structure for the PEDI-G domains (self-care, mobility and social function) of the Functional Skills Scale and the Caregiver Assistance Scale. Results: 262 children (118 (45%) girls and 144 (55%) boys) participated in this study. Their mean age (SD) was 4 years (SD 1.91). Results suggest that the PEDI domains of the Functional Skills Scale and the Caregivers Assistance Scale can be used as unidimensional measures to evaluate child`s ability to perform activities of daily living. Conclusion: The results of this study support the use of the PEDI-G for research and practice in Austria, Germany and Switzerland.

  • 19.
    Thalén, Liv
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Margot-Cattin, Isabel
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden.;Univ Appl Sci & Arts Western Switzerland HES SO, Dept Occupat Therapy, Sch Social Work & Hlth Lausanne HETSL, Delemont, Switzerland..
    Gaber, Sophie N.
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll,Dept Hlth Care Sci, Huddinge, Sweden.;Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Clin Psychol Healthcare, Huddinge, Sweden..
    Seetharaman, Kishore
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Gerontol, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Chaudhury, Habib
    Simon Fraser Univ, Dept Gerontol, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Cutchin, Malcolm
    Pacific Northwest Univ Hlth Sci, Yakima, WA USA..
    Wallcook, Sarah
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Brorsson, Anna
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Div Occupat Therapy, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc, S-14183 Huddinge, Sweden..
    Out-of-home participation among people living with dementia: A study in four countries2022In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 1636-1652, article id 14713012221084173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social participation in out-of-home activities is important for people living with dementia, yet little is known about such participation. The aim of this study was to explore and compare out-of-home participation among people living with dementia in four countries by assessing different types of places of participation visited or no longer visited. A cross-sectional design was used to gather self-reported experiences concerning out-of-home participation among people with mild stage dementia living in Canada (n = 29), Sweden (n = 35), Switzerland (n = 35) and the UK (n = 64). Interviews were conducted using the Participation in ACTivities and places OUTside the Home for older adults (ACT-OUT) instrument. Participants still visited 16 (Median) places out of a possible total of 24, and they had abandoned 5 (Median) places. Neighbourhood was the place most participants still visited, whereas 50% of them had stopped going to a Sports facility, with no significant differences between country samples regarding how many participants had abandoned that place (Fisher's exact test, p > 0.01). There were significant differences between country samples in the frequency of present participation and abandonment of the Hospital, Dentist's office, Cemetery, Garden, and Forest (Fisher's exact test, all p < 0.01). Although the participants still visited a variety of places, they had stopped going to places previously visited, which indicates reductions in participation, posing an inherent risk to well-being. The similarities and differences across samples from the four countries suggest that healthcare services and access to public transport may contribute to the complex interactional process of out-of-home participation for people living with dementia. The findings highlight the need for initiatives targeting specific types of places to support continued participation in society, especially places at a higher risk of abandonment such as places for recreation and physical activity.

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  • 20. Wallcook, Sarah
    et al.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Nygård, Louise
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    Lee, Jenica
    Walsh, Ryan
    Gaber, Sophie
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    The perceived challenge of everyday technologies in Sweden, the United States and England: Exploring differential item functioning in the everyday technology use questionnaire2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 554-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The changing technological environment is reflected in regular updates made to the everyday technology (ET) use questionnaire (ETUQ). Newly added ETs may not present comparable challenges across countries and diagnoses.

    Aims: To identify whether country context, or dementia diagnosis, impact ETs’ challenge level.

    Material and methods: 315 older adults from three countries were included; Sweden (n = 73), United States (n = 114), England (n = 128), and had a confirmed diagnosis of mild dementia (n = 99) or no known cognitive impairment (n = 216). Differential Items Functioning (DIF) analysis was performed on 88 ETs included in the ETUQ by country and diagnosis. The impact of DIF was evaluated in a Differential Test Functioning (DTF) analysis.

    Results: Nine items (10.2%) in the ETUQ showed statistically significant DIF between countries; five of which were public space ETs and none of which were information and communication technologies (ICTs). Three ICT items, and no others, showed significant DIF by diagnosis. The items’ DIF was shown to have no impact upon person measures of ability to use ET in the DTF.

    Conclusions and significance: The utility of the ETUQ in occupational therapy practice and research internationally is highlighted through the stability of the challenge hierarchy and lack of impact on person measures.

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  • 21.
    Wallcook, Sarah
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet; UCL, London, England.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Gaber, Sophie
    Karolinska Institutet; UCL, London, England.
    Charlesworth, Georgina
    UCL, London, England; North East London Foundation Trust; England.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kaleidoscopic associations between life outside home and the technological environment that shape occupational injustice as revealed through cross-sectional statistical modelling2021In: Journal of Occupational Science, ISSN 1442-7591, E-ISSN 2158-1576, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 42-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Everyday life outside home and accessing a variety of places are central to occupation. Technology is ever more taken for granted, even outside home, and for some may culminate in occupational injustice. This study aims to explore the association between everyday technologies (ET), particularly out of home, and the number of places older adults with and without dementia go to, in rural and urban environments. Method: The Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, and Participation in Activities and Places Outside Home Questionnaire, were administered with 128 people in England. Six logistic regression models explored the association between ET and the number of places people went to, with other demographic factors (i.e., rurality, diagnosis, deprivation). Results: The amount of out of home technologies a person perceived relevant and relative levels of neighbourhood deprivation were most persistently associated with the number of places people went to. Associations with ability to use technology, diagnosis, and education were more tentative. In no model was rurality significant. All models explained a low proportion of variance and lacked sensitivity to predict the outcome. Conclusion: For a minority of people, perceptions of the technological environment are associated with other personal and environmental dimensions. Viewed kaleidoscopically, these associations assemble to generate an impermanent, fragmented view of occupational injustice that may jeopardise opportunities outside home. However, there will be other influential factors not identified in this study. Greater attention to the intersections between specific environmental dimensions may deepen understanding of how modifications can be made to deliver occupational justice.

  • 22. Walsh, Ryan
    et al.
    Drasga, Ruxandra
    Lee, Jenica
    Leggett, Caniece
    Shapnick, Holly
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Activity Engagement and Everyday Technology Use Among Older Adults in an Urban Area2018In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 72, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. We investigated associations among activity engagement (AE), number of available and relevant everyday technologies, ability to use everyday technologies, and cognitive status among older adults in an urban area. METHOD. This cross-sectional study included 110 participants and used three assessments: the Frenchay Activities Index to measure AE, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire to measure the number of and ability to use available and relevant everyday technologies, and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment to measure cognitive status. Data analyses used a one-way analysis of variance and a multiple linear regression model. RESULTS. The number of available and relevant everyday technologies was significantly different (p < .001) among groups that varied in level of AE. Ability to use everyday technologies did not significantly differ among groups. Cognitive status did not explain level of AE when the number of available and relevant everyday technologies was considered. CONCLUSION. Increasing the accessibility of available and relevant everyday technologies among older adults in an urban area may increase AE.

  • 23.
    Walsh, Ryan J.
    et al.
    Washington Univ, Sch Med, St Louis, MO 63108 USA..
    Lee, Jenica
    Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL USA..
    Drasga, Ruxandra M.
    Community First Med Ctr, Chicago, IL USA..
    Leggett, Caniece S.
    Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL USA..
    Shapnick, Holly M.
    Esperanza Community Serv, Chicago, IL USA..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Everyday Technology Use and Overall Needed Assistance to Function in the Home and Community Among Urban Older Adults2020In: Journal of Applied Gerontology, ISSN 0733-4648, E-ISSN 1552-4523, Vol. 39, no 10, article id UNSP 0733464819878620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older adults manage increasing numbers of everyday technologies to participate in home and community activities. Purpose: We investigated how assessing use of everyday technologies enhanced predictions of overall needed assistance among urban older adults. Method: We used a cross-sectional design to analyze responses from 114 participants completing the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, and a sociodemographic questionnaire. We estimated overall needed assistance based on definitions in the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills. We created logistic regression models and receiver operator characteristic curves to analyze variables predicting overall needed assistance. Findings: With high specificity and sensitivity, the Everyday Technology Use Questionnaire and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment were the strongest predictors of overall needed assistance.

  • 24.
    Walsh, Ryan
    et al.
    HCR ManorCare & Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Homewood, IL USA.;HCR ManorCare & Shirley Ryan AbilityLab, Chicago, IL USA..
    Lee, Jenica
    Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL USA..
    Leggett, Caniece
    Univ Illinois, Chicago, IL USA..
    Drasga, Ruxandra
    Shapnick, Holly
    Esperanza Community Serv, Chicago, IL USA..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Disability Risk and Everyday Technology Use Among Older Adults in an Urban Area2019In: American Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 0272-9490, E-ISSN 1943-7676, Vol. 73, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Weiber, Ingrid
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Tengland, Per-Anders
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berglund, Johan
    Eklund, Mona
    Social and Healthcare Professionals' Experiences of Giving Support to Families Where the Mother Has an Intellectual Disability: Focus on Children2014In: Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities, ISSN 1741-1122, E-ISSN 1741-1130, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 293-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Families where the mother has an intellectual disability need support to counteract possible detrimental life circumstances for the children involved. The aim of this study was to describe social and healthcare professionals' experiences of providing support for families with maternal intellectual disability and specifically focused on if and how they believed the support practices benefited the children. Seven focus group interviews were performed with 29 professional informants. The transcripts were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. Three themes were identified: “support practices,” “pedagogical strategies when supporting families with maternal intellectual disability,” and “maintaining the child perspective.” The support practices mainly dealt with parenting skills, which were addressed by a variety of teaching methods and practices, while the children were at risk of not being seen or heard.

  • 26. Weiber, Ingrid
    et al.
    Tengland, Per-Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berglund, Johan Sanmartin
    Eklund, Mona
    Everyday life when growing up with a mother with an intellectual or developmental disability: Four retrospective life-stories.2020In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 418-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The voices of those who have grown up in a family with maternal intellectual or developmental disability (IDD) are valuable for gaining an understanding of their situation, which is essential in order to be able to support these families and avoid potentially detrimental situations.

    Aim: The study aim was to describe the experience of having grown up in a family where the mother has an IDD, with a focus on everyday life and perceived health consequences in adult life.

    Method: A qualitative method with retrospective narrative interviews and narrative content analysis was chosen. In-depth interviews were performed with four women who had experiences of a childhood with maternal IDD.

    Findings: Four themes emerged: Living under adverse circumstances; Dealing with one’s everyday life situation; Receiving insufficient support and wishing for more; and The echo from childhood into adult life. The findings revealed a distressing childhood, characterized by neglect, abuse, anxiety, and overburdening responsibilities, and also endeavors to keep the family situation a secret, while at the same time wanting the adult world to react.

    Discussion: The findings can hopefully stimulate occupational therapists and other professionals to more effectively identify the situation of these children and provide support to prevent adverse future health conditions and poor well-being.

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  • 27. Wenger, Ines
    et al.
    Schulze, Christina
    Kottorp, Anders
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Are the American normative standard scores applicable to the German version of the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI-G)?2021In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 110-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI) is an assessment to evaluate children’s performance in activities of daily living.

    Aims: The study investigated if the normative standard scores of the PEDI are applicable to the German version of the PEDI (PEDI-G) in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and whether there are differences in the applicability of the PEDI-G between the three countries.

    Materials and methods: 75 children with normal development (35 girls, 40 boys) from Germany (n = 17), Austria (n = 16), and Switzerland (n = 42) aged between 0.9 month and 7.3 years (SD = 2.03) participated in the study. Descriptive statistics, independent samples t-tests, univariate analyses of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey tests were applied.

    Results: No significant differences were identified. However, the German-speaking sample showed higher scores for the domain social function in both scales and in the Caregiver Assistance Scale self-care. Lower scores were identified in the Functional Skills Scale mobility.

    Conclusions and significance: The results support that the normative standard scores of the PEDI are applicable to the PEDI-G and for Austria, Germany and Switzerland, as no significant differences between the countries were identified. However, the generalizability of the results is limited due to sample size and recruitment procedures.

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