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  • 1.
    Cirovic, Stefan
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Malmgren, Andreas
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, 205 06, Sweden.
    Kurdie, Rayane
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, 205 06, Sweden.
    Bilal, Dejan
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, 205 06, Sweden.
    Dencker, Magnus
    Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, 205 06, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Vortex formation time in female athletes2024In: The International Journal of Cardiovascular Imaging, ISSN 1569-5794, E-ISSN 1875-8312, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 373-384Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Regular, vigorous physical activity can have a significant impact on cardiac function, leading to cardiac morphological alterations that may be challenging to distinguish from pathological changes. Therefore, new screening methods are needed to accurately differentiate between adaptive changes and pathological alterations in athletes. Vortex formation time (VFT) is an emerging method that shows potential in this regard, as it involves the formation of a rotating vortex ring in the left ventricle during the early filling phase of diastole. In this study, we investigated the difference in VFT between two groups of women: professional handball players and healthy middle-aged female athletes, along with their corresponding control groups. By using echocardiography-Doppler analysis of the heart, VFT was calculated based on the left ventricular ejection fraction, the ratio between the end-diastolic volume and the diameter of the mitral annulus, and the ratio of the atrial contraction volume to the total inflow via the mitral valve. The study reveals a significant increase in VFT in both professional handball players and middle-aged female athletes compared to their respective control groups. Moreover, statistically significant differences between handball players and middle-aged female athletes were observed, indicating that the level of physical activity may affect the VFT. These results suggest that VFT could be a promising screening tool for identifying cardiac adaptations due to long-term vigorous training, potentially enabling more accurate diagnoses of cardiac morphological alterations in athletes. Representation of the graphical abstract of the conducted research.

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  • 2.
    Correa M., Yubexi Y.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Role of lipoprotein structure and dynamics in disease development: from atherosclerosis to Covid-192023Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipoproteins play a crucial role in lipid metabolism, serving as carriers for lipids such as cholesterol and triglycerides in the bloodstream. Atherosclerosis is a complex cardiovascular disease characterized by the accumulation of cholesterol-rich plaques in arterial walls, leading to narrowed and hardened arteries. Recently, the spike protein from the SARS-CoV-2 virus, responsible for COVID-19, has been the subject of research concerning its potential impact on lipid metabolism and its association with cardiovascular disease. Understanding the interaction between lipoproteins and the spike protein influence on lipid metabolism could have implications for our knowledge of cardiovascular health.

    In this research, we investigated the ultrastructure of HDL from individuals with different lipid profiles as well as the interaction of mature HDL and model of nascent HDL with model membranes. Understanding these differences will help create novel rHDL particles with superior lipid-removing and CVD-treating properties. Finally, the interaction between the spike protein and HDL in model cell membranes to study potential imbalances in lipid metabolism. To achieve the different objectives, lipid deposition, exchange and removal were followed by techniques such as Neutron reflection and attenuated total reflection Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy while, the ultrastructure was unravelled by small-angle X-ray scattering.

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  • 3.
    Correa, Yubexi
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jansen, M.
    Univ Med Ctr Freiburg, Inst Clin Chem & Lab Med, Freiburg, Germany..
    Blanchet, C.
    DESY, Embl, Hamburg, Germany..
    Roosen-Runge, Felix
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Pedersen, J. S.
    Aarhus Univ, Interdisciplinary Nanosci Ctr Inano, Aarhus, Denmark..
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Structural studies on LDL from patients with high and low lipoprotein (a)2022In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 355, p. 56-56, article id EP164Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Dieden, A.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Helm, H.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Melander, O.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Pareek, M.
    Yale Sch Med, Yale New Haven Hosp, New Haven, CT USA..
    Molvin, J.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Rastam, L.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Lindblad, U.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Daka, B.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Med, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Leosdottir, M.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Olsen, M. H.
    Univ Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Jujic, A.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Magnusson, M.
    Lund Univ, Malmo, Sweden..
    Biomarkers associated with prevalent hypertension and higher blood pressure in a population-based cohort: a proteomic approach2022In: European Heart Journal, ISSN 0195-668X, E-ISSN 1522-9645, Vol. 43, no Suppl 2, p. 2189-2189Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundGlobally, hypertension represents an enormous health issue as it is a major, yet modifiable risk factor for developing cardiovascular disease. Recently, chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1) was shown to be positively associated with the incidence of hypertension among prehypertensive subjects, and variants of CHI3L1 gene were associated with both CHI3L1-levels and hypertension.PurposeTo explore associations between prevalent hypertension and blood pressure, and 92 proteins with involvement in inflammation and cardiovascular disease.MethodsPlasma samples from 1713 individuals from a Swedish population-based cohort (mean age 67.3±6.0 years; 28.9% women) were analysed with a proximity extension assay panel, consisting of 92 proteins. Prior to all analyses, subjects with prevalent cardiovascular disease, defined as having a history of prevalent coronary or stroke event, were excluded (n=189). Univariate logistic regression models were carried out exploring associations between each of the 92 proteins and prevalent hypertension, defined as systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg and/or a diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or use of antihypertensive treatment (n=1168, 76.4%). Bonferroni-corrected significant associations between proteins and hypertension were further analysed using stepwise selection of covariates, namely age, body mass index, diabetes status, and cystatin C, in logistic regression models. Proteins with significant adjusted associations with prevalent hypertension were further analysed for associations with systolic and diastolic blood pressure individually in stepwise linear regression models. Complete data on all variables were available in 1527 subjects.ResultsSixteen proteins were significantly associated with prevalent hypertension in univariate analyses. After adjustment, three proteins remained significantly associated with prevalent hypertension (i.e., CHI3L1, low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL receptor) and tissue plasminogen activator (tPA); Table 1). In analyses of associations with systolic blood pressure, CHI3L1 and LDL receptor showed significant associations. In analyses of associations with diastolic blood pressure, CHI3L1, LDL receptor and tPA showed significant associations (Table 1).ConclusionsHigher CHI3L1, tPA and LDL receptor levels were positively associated with prevalent hypertension after multivariable adjustment, among 1527 elderly subjects without established cardiovascular disease. Furthermore, higher CHI3L and LDL receptor levels were positively associated with mean systolic, as well as mean diastolic blood pressure in multivariable analyses.Funding AcknowledgementType of funding sources: Foundation. Main funding source(s): The Swedish Medical Research Council and The Swedish Heart and Lung Foundation

  • 5.
    Dieden, A.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Holm, H.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Molvin, J.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Korduner, J.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Nezami, Z.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Zaghi, A.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Bachus, E.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jujic, A.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Magnusson, M.
    Lund Univ, Malmö, Sweden..
    Galectin-4 is associated with diabetes in a heart failure population2023In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 25, no S2, p. 317-318Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Dieden, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Korduner, Johan
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Molvin, John
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Zaghi, Amir
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nezami, Zainu
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bachus, Erasmus
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Late-Stage Development, Cardiovascular, Renal, and Metabolism, BioPharmaceuticals R&D, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Holm, Hannes
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Jujic, Amra
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), North West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa; Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Galectin-4 is associated with diabetes and obesity in a heart failure population2023In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 20285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An association between high Galectin-4 (Gal-4) and prevalence of diabetes in subjects with heart failure (HF) has previously been reported. The purpose of this study was to confirm these findings, as well as to further investigate this association, in a Swedish HF population. In addition, a second aim was to explore Gal-4's association with obesity and biomarkers of metabolism and heart failure. Gal-4 was measured using a proximity extension array technique in 324 hospitalized HF patients within the Swedish HeArt and bRain failure investigation trial cohort. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥ 30. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to explore associations between Gal-4 and diabetes/obesity, and linear regression models were used to explore the associations between Gal-4 and biomarkers. A total of 309 participants (29.1% female; mean age 74.8 years) provided complete data for the analysis of associations between Gal-4 and diabetes. Additionally, for the analysis of heart failure phenotype, complete data was available for 230 subjects. Gal-4 was positively associated with prevalent diabetes (OR 2.60; CI 95% 1.56-4.32). In multivariable models, Gal-4 levels were significantly associated with obesity, but only for subjects with diabetes (OR 2.48; 1.09-5.62). Additionally, Gal-4 demonstrated a significant association with the incretin Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), as well as with biomarkers of HF. In the stratified analyses, the association between Gal-4 and diabetes was prominent in patients with reduced ejection fraction (n = 160, OR 3.26; 95%CI 1.88-5.66), while it was not observed in those without (n = 70, 1.96 (0.75-5.10)). In this cross-sectional, observational study, higher Gal-4 levels in HF patients were associated with higher GIP levels. Further, increased levels of Gal-4 were associated with increased likelihood of diabetes, and obesity. This association was particularly pronounced in individuals with HF characterized by reduced ejection fraction. Additionally, Gal-4 levels were significantly elevated in heart failure patients with diabetes and obesity.

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  • 7.
    Dieden, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Korduner, J.
    Lund Univ, Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Molvin, J.
    Lund Univ, Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Kitlinski, M.
    Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Holm, H.
    Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Bachus, E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Jujic, A.
    Lund Univ, Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Magnusson, M.
    Lund Univ, Malmö Univ Hosp, Dept Clin Sci, Lund, Sweden..
    Multiplex proteomics for prediction of 1-year mortality and re-hospitalization in heart failure patients2020In: European Journal of Heart Failure, ISSN 1388-9842, E-ISSN 1879-0844, Vol. 22, no S1, p. 72-73, article id P437Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Dieden, Anna
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Lund University.
    Malan, Leone
    Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART).
    Mels, Catharina M C
    Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART); MRC Research Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
    Lammertyn, Leandi
    Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART); MRC Research Unit for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
    Wentzel, Annemarie
    Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART).
    Nilsson, Peter M
    Lund University.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Jujic, Amra
    Lund University; Skåne University Hospital, Malmö.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Lund University; Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART); Skåne University Hospital, Malmö;.
    Exploring biomarkers associated with deteriorating vascular health using a targeted proteomics chip: The SABPA study2021In: Medicine, ISSN 0025-7974, E-ISSN 1536-5964, Vol. 100, no 20, article id e25936Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ABSTRACT: In this observational study, by the use of a multiplex proteomic platform, we aimed to explore associations between 92 targeted proteins involved in cardiovascular disease and/or inflammation, and phenotypes of deteriorating vascular health, with regards to ethnicity.Proteomic profiling (92 proteins) was carried out in 362 participants from the Sympathetic activity and Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Africans (SABPA) study of black and white African school teachers (mean age 44.7 ± 9.9 years, 51.9% women, 44.5% Black Africans, 9.9% with known cardiovascular disease). Three proteins with <15% of samples below detectable limits were excluded from analyses. Associations between multiple proteins and prevalence of hypertension as well as vascular health [Carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and pulse wave velocity (PWV)] measures were explored using Bonferroni-corrected regression models.Bonferroni-corrected significant associations between 89 proteins and vascular health markers were further adjusted for clinically relevant co-variates. Hypertension was associated with growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF-15) and C-X-C motif chemokine 16 (CXCL16). cIMT was associated with carboxypeptidase A1 (CPA1), C-C motif chemokine 15 (CCL15), chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1), scavenger receptor cysteine-rich type 1 protein M130 (CD163) and osteoprotegerin, whereas PWV was associated with GDF15, E-selectin, CPA1, fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), CXCL16, carboxypeptidase B (CPB1), and tissue-type plasminogen activator. Upon entering ethnicity into the models, the associations between PWV and CPA1, CPB1, GDF-15, FABP4, CXCL16, and between cIMT and CCL-15, remained significant.Using a multiplex proteomic approach, we linked phenotypes of vascular health with several proteins. Novel associations were found between hypertension, PWV or cIMT and proteins linked to inflammatory response, chemotaxis, coagulation or proteolysis. Further, we could reveal whether the associations were ethnicity-dependent or not.

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  • 9. Dimayuga, P
    et al.
    Cercek, B
    Oguchi, S
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Yano, J
    Shah, PK
    Jovinge, S
    Nilsson, J
    Inhibitory Effect on Arterial Injury-Induced Neointimal Formation by Adoptive B-Cell Transfer in Rag-1 Knockout Mice2002In: Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology, ISSN 1079-5642, E-ISSN 1524-4636, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 644-649Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Edsfeldt, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Wallenberg Centre for Molecular Medicine, Lund University, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden..
    Singh, Pratibha
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Matthes, Frank
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Tengryd, Christoffer
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Cavalera, Michele
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Dunér, Pontus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Volkov, Petr
    LUDC Bioinformatics Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden; Data Science and Quantitative Biology, Discovery Sciences, R&D, AstraZeneca, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Karadimou, Glykeria
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Gisterå, Anton
    Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Solna, Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.; Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Sun, Jiangming
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden..
    Gonçalves, Isabel
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Malmö, Lund University, Sweden.; Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden..
    Transforming growth factor-β2 is associated with atherosclerotic plaque stability and lower risk for cardiovascular events2023In: Cardiovascular Research, ISSN 0008-6363, E-ISSN 1755-3245, Vol. 119, no 11, p. 2061-2073, article id cvad079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) exists in three isoforms TGF-β1, -β2 and -β3. TGF-β1 has been suggested to be important for maintaining plaque stability, yet the role of TGF-β2 and -β3 in atherosclerosis remains to be investigated.

    OBJECTIVE: This study explores the association of these three isoforms of TGF-β with plaque stability in the human atherosclerotic disease.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: TGF-β1, -β2 and -β3 proteins were quantified in 223 human carotid plaques by immunoassays. Indications for the endarterectomy were: symptomatic carotid plaque with stenosis >70% or without symptoms and >80% stenosis. Plaque mRNA levels were assessed by RNA sequencing. Plaque components and extracellular matrix were measured histologically and biochemically. Matrix metalloproteinases were measured with ELISA. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) was measured with immunoassays. The effect of TGF-β2 on inflammation and protease activity was investigated in vitro using THP-1 and RAW264.7 macrophages. Patients were followed longitudinally for cardiovascular events.TGF-β2 was the most abundant isoform and was increased at both protein and mRNA levels in asymptomatic plaques. TGF-β2 was the main determinant separating asymptomatic plaques in an Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis. TGF-β2 correlated positively to features of plaque stability and inversely to markers of plaque vulnerability. TGF-β2 was the only isoform inversely correlated to the matrix-degrading matrix metalloproteinase-9 and inflammation in the plaque tissue. In vitro, TGF-β2 pre-treatment reduced MCP-1 gene and protein levels as well as matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene levels and activity. Patients with plaques with high TGF-β2 levels had a lower risk to suffer from future cardiovascular events.

    CONCLUSIONS: TGF-β2 is the most abundant TGF-β isoform in human plaques and may maintain plaque stability by decreasing inflammation and matrix degradation.

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  • 11. Engelbertsen, Daniel
    et al.
    Anand, DV
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Hopkins, D
    Corder, R
    Shah, Prediman K
    Lahiri, A
    Nilsson, Jan
    Bengtsson, Eva
    High levels of IgM against methylglyoxal-modified apolipoprotein B 100 is associated with less coronary artery calcification in patients with type 2 diabetes.2012In: Journal of Internal Medicine, ISSN 0954-6820, E-ISSN 1365-2796, Vol. 271, no 1, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) have been implicated in diabetic vascular complications through activation of pro‐inflammatory genes. AGE‐modified proteins are also targeted by the immune system resulting in the generation of AGE‐specific autoantibodies, but the association of these immune responses with diabetic vasculopathy remains to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine whether antibodies against apolipoprotein B100 modified by methylglyoxal (MGO‐apoB100) are associated with coronary atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Methods: We measured antibodies against MGO‐apoB100 in plasma from 497 type 2 diabetic patients without clinical signs of cardiovascular disease. Severity of coronary disease was assessed as coronary artery calcium (CAC) imaging. Immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG levels recognizing MGO‐apoB100 were determined by enzyme‐linked immunosorbent assay.

    Results: Anti‐MGO‐apoB100 IgM antibody levels were higher in subjects with a low to moderate CAC score (≤400 Agatston units) than in subjects with a high score (>400 Agatston units; 136.8 ± 4.4 vs. 101.6 ± 7.4 arbitrary units (AU), P < 0.0001) and in subjects demonstrating no progression of CAC during 30 months of follow‐up (136.4 ± 5.7 vs. 113.9 ± 6.2 AU in subjects with progression, P < 0.0001). Subjects with a family history of premature myocardial infarction had lower levels of anti‐MGO‐apoB100 IgM. Female subjects had higher levels of anti‐MGO‐apoB100 antibodies and lower CAC than men. Accordingly, high levels of IgM against MGO‐apoB100 are associated with less severe and a lower risk of progression of coronary disease in subjects with type 2 diabetes.

    Conclusions: Although conclusions regarding causal relationships based on epidemiological observations need to be made with caution, our findings suggest the possibility that anti‐MGO‐apoB100 IgM may be protective in diabetic vasculopathy.

  • 12.
    Fatic, Amajla
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    RIGHT VENTRICULAR STROKE WORK INDEX MED EKOKARDIOGRAFI HOS PATIENTER MED PULMONELL ARTERIELL HYPERTENSION, EN JÄMFÖRELSE MED HÖGERSIDIG HJÄRTKATETERISERING.2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a disease with many different etiologies contributing to an increased pressure in the pulmonary circulation. PH is defined as a mean arterial pressure in the pulmonary artery ≥ 25mm Hg at rest measured by right heart catheterization (RHC). The different causes of PH are divided into five groups. This study focuses on group I, which consists of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH contributes to a pressure overload of the right ventricle. The right ventricle must work at a higher pressure, which leads to a reduced right ventricular function. Currently, right ventricular stroke work index (RVSWI) by right heart catheterization (RHC) is a measure of right ventricular workload. The purpose of the study was to compare RVSWI calculated with echocardiography to RVSWI by RHC. And to find an additional measure for assessing right ventricular function by echocardiography in patients with PAH.  RVSWI was evaluated with two echocardiographic methods (RVSWIEKO1= 90 - (0,62 x pulmonary acceleration time (PAT) x stroke volume index (SVIEKO)), RVSWIEKO2= ((0,61 x tricuspid regurgitant maximum pressure gradient (TRmaxPG)) + mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) + 2) x SVIEKO). Both the echocardiographic methods showed a statistically significant difference (p <0.001) in absolute values ​​compared to RVSWI by RHC. One of the echocardiographic methods (RVSWI EKO2) showed a moderate correlation with RHC, while RVSWIEKO1 showed a negligible with RHC. The study has shown that RVSWI evaluated with echocardiography can be used as an additional measure, when assessing right ventricular function. However, more studies are needed until the parameter can be used clinically.

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  • 13.
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Detection of Myocardial Ischemia using Real-Time Myocardial Contrast Echocardiography2006Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Echocardiography is an ideal clinical method for obtaining information about morphology and function of the heart. Echocardiography is more accessible, mobile and inexpensive compared to other imaging techniques and has become the perhaps most used diagnostic method in cardiology during recent years. To assess myocardial ischemia, different types of stress echocardiography have been available, where mainly wall motion analysis at rest and stress has been used to evaluate the presence and extent of ischemia. During the last few years, second generation contrast agents have become clinically available. This has improved image quality in echocardiography, which, combined with new ultrasound technical developments, has made it possible to obtain echocardiographic images of myocardial perfusion. When this myocardial contrast echocardiography technique is carried out in real-time, as in the studies of this thesis, it is labelled real-time perfusion (RTP). RTP in combination of adenosine stress (RTP-ASE) has the potential to become a valuable clinical tool to evaluate myocardial ischemia. If proven as accurate as other clinically and scientifically accepted methods, such as 99mTc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), RTP-ASE might become an alternative method. Compared to SPECT, it is more accessible, mobile, inexpensive, and without radiation, compared to dobutamine-atropine stress echocardiography (DSE) it is more tolerable and swifter, and it is more accurate than exercise ECG. In all studies of this thesis, we performed RTP-ASE in patients with known or suspected stable coronary artery disease (CAD), admitted to adenosine SPECT evaluation. Adenosine was infused to provoke relative regional hypo-perfusion in ischemic myocardial territories. Using a SONOS 5500 echocardiography machine, patients underwent RTP imaging during Sonovue infusion, before and throughout the adenosine stress, also used for SPECT. RTP images were stored for later, blinded, off-line analysis. In studies III and IV, the commercially available software Qontrast was used to generate parametric images of myocardial perfusion and quantitative values of perfusion replenishment from RTP-ASE image loops. Method of reference for the ischemia evaluation in the thesis was the presence or absence of reversible ischemia at SPECT. The left ventricular myocardium was divided into three territories corresponding to the distribution territories of the three main coronary arteries; left anterior descending (LAD), left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary artery (RCA). In studies I and II, we investigated the feasibility of RTP-ASE for the detection of ischemia using visual interpretation of RTP-ASE loops acquired at rest and stress. Study III was carried out to examine the value of quantitatively generated parametric perfusion images from RTP-ASE loops, in detecting myocardial ischemia. In study IV, the usefulness of quantitative detection of myocardial ischemia from RTP-ASE loops was assessed. Data comparing quantitative measurements of perfusion replenishment from RTP-ASE images at rest and stress were used as markers of ischemia. The results from the studies in this thesis suggest that visual evaluation of ischemia from RTP-ASE images, using angio-mode as well as high resolution grey scale mode, is accurate and feasible. It is therefore a clinically useful method in patients with known or suspected stable CAD. Quantification of ischemia or parametric imaging for ischemia evaluation using Qontrast, are not yet suitable for clinical use, as judged by the findings of this thesis. However, since further technical development can be expected, quantitative assessment of myocardial perfusion may well be a clinically useful method in the near future.

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  • 14.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS). Department of Cardiology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Department of Cardiology, Linköping University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Medicine and Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
    Lindholm, Maud
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Cardiology, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Description of self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, symptoms, quality of life and physical capacity in patients with stable chronic heart failure.2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 2318-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe the self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, signs and symptoms of heart failure, quality of life, physical capacity and thirst, in patients with stabilised chronic heart failure.

    BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic heart failure are often recommended a fluid restriction of 1.5 l/day but there is no evidence in the literature for this recommendation and little is known about the fluid intake consequences.

    DESIGN: Crossover study.

    METHODS: Chronic heart failure patients, clinically stabilised after an unstable state, were randomised to a 32-week cross-over study assessing the clinical importance of fluid prescription. In a secondary analysis of 63 patients, efficacy variables were analysed in relation to the self-reported median fluid intake of 19 ml/kg body weight/day.

    RESULTS: The mean fluid intake was 16 ml/kg/day in the below-median group and 24 ml/kg/day in the above-median group. No between-group differences were found in change in body weight, signs and symptoms, diuretic use, quality of life or physical capacity. However, the above-median group significantly decreased sense of thirst and difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription compared with the below-median group.

    CONCLUSION: In clinically stabilised chronic heart failure patients on optimal pharmacological treatment, a larger fluid intake was associated with decreasing thirst without any measurable negative effects on signs and symptoms of heart failure, diuretic use or physical capacity. Thus, a more liberal fluid intake may be advisable in chronic heart failure patients who have been stabilised after an initial unstable clinical state.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses involved in the care for patients with heart failure known how troublesome thirst can be and how difficult it can be to follow a restricted fluid intake. This study indicates that it is possible to reassess and recommend a less strict fluid intake in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure.

  • 15.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Strömberg, Anna
    Lindholm, Maud
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Liberal versus restricted fluid prescription in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure: result of a randomised cross-over study of the effects on health-related quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and morbidity.2008In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 316-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of a restrictive versus a liberal fluid prescription, on quality of life, physical capacity, thirst and hospital admissions, in patients who had improved from NYHA class (III-)IV CHF to a stable condition without clinical signs of significant fluid overload.

    DESIGN: The present study is a randomised cross-over study. Seventy-four patients (mean age 70+/-10 years, 16% women) -- with mild-moderate CHF -- were randomised 1:1 to either of two 16-week interventions. Intervention 1 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 L/day. Intervention 2 prescribed a maximum fluid intake of 30-35 ml/kg body weight/day. Sixty-five patients completed the study.

    RESULTS: There were no significant between-intervention differences in end-of-intervention quality of life, physical capacity or hospitalisation. However, there was a significant favourable effect on thirst and less difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription during the liberal fluid prescription intervention.

    CONCLUSION: The results from this study indicate that it may be beneficial and safe to recommend a liberal fluid prescription, based on body weight, in stabilised CHF patients. These results warrant further investigation of the effects of fluid advice in CHF.

  • 16. Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lindholm, Maud
    The experiences of living with chronic heart failure2008Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Lindholm, Maud
    Strömberg, Anna
    Telephone follow-up of self-care behaviour after a single session education of patients with heart failure in primary health care.2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 153-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Improved self-care behaviour is a goal in educational programmes for patients with heart failure, especially in regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction.

    AIMS: The objectives of the present study were to: (1) describe self-care with special regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction in patients with heart failure in primary health care, during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education, (2) to describe gender differences in regard to self-care and (3) to investigate if self-care was associated with health-related quality of life.

    METHODS: The present analysis is a subgroup analysis of a larger randomised trial. After one intensive educational session, a primary health care nurse evaluated 60 patients (mean age 79 years, 52% males, 60% in New York Heart Association class III-IV) by monthly telephone follow-up during 12 months.

    RESULTS: The intervention had no effect on quality of life measured by EuroQol 5D and no significant associations were found between quality of life and self-care behaviour. Self-care behaviour measured by The European Self-care Behaviour Scale remained unchanged throughout the study period. No significant gender differences were shown but women had a tendency to improve adherence to daily weight control between 3- and 12 months.

    CONCLUSION: The self-care behaviour and quality of life in patients with heart failure did not change during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education and this indicates a need for more extensive interventions to obtain improved self-care behaviour in these patients.

  • 18.
    Jujic, Amra
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Molvin, John
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Holm Isholth, Hannes
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Dieden, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Korduner, Johan
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Zaghi, Amir
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Nezami, Zainu
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden..
    Bergmann, Andreas
    Sphingotec GmbH, Hennigsdorf, Germany..
    Schomburg, Lutz
    Charite Univ Med Berlin, Berlin, Germany..
    Magnusson, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Wallenberg Ctr Mol Med, Lund, Sweden.;North West Univ, Hypertens Africa Res Team HART, Potchefstroom, South Africa..
    Association between low selenoprotein P concentrations and anaemia in hospitalized heart failure patients2024In: ESC Heart Failure, E-ISSN 2055-5822, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 877-882Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims Heart failure (HF) patients with anaemia tend to have a worse outcome, with increased hospitalization rates, decreased exercise tolerance, and higher mortality compared to those without anaemia. Limited research exists on the association between selenium deficiency and anaemia specifically in HF patients, despite previous findings of a correlation in different populations. The BIOSTAT-CHF study demonstrated that higher selenium levels in HF patients were associated to a lower risk of anaemia and iron deficiency. This study investigates the relationship between selenoprotein P (SELENOP) concentrations, a major contributor and functional biomarker of selenium transport, and anaemia, Hb levels, and iron status in hospitalized HF patients.Methods and results SELENOP was analysed in 320 hospitalized HF subjects, with complete data available for 310 subjects. The relationships between continuous SELENOP concentrations and 1) Hb concentrations, 2) anaemia (Hb < 115 g/L (women), <130 g/L (men)), and 3) iron status (as measured by transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) which increases in iron deficiency) were evaluated using multivariable logistic and linear regression models. Additionally, SELENOP concentrations in the lowest quartile were related to anaemia, haemoglobin, and iron state in multivariable logistic and linear models. The mean age of the study population was 75.0 +/- 11.6 years, and 30% were women. Anaemia was present in 133 subjects (42.9%). SELENOP concentrations were positively correlated with haemoglobin concentrations (0.238; P < 0.001) and negatively with TfR1 concentrations (-0.238, P < 0.001). In multivariable regression models, higher SELENOP concentrations were associated with higher Hb concentrations (B = 3.23; P = 0.002) and lower TfR1 concentrations (B = -0.20; P < 0.001). Furthermore, SELENOP deficiency was associated with lower Hb concentrations (B = -7.64: P = 0.001), higher TfR1 concentrations (B = 0.31; P = 0.003), and higher odds of anaemia in HF patients (odds ratio 2.17; 95% confidence interval 1.23-3.82; P = 0.008).Conclusions In hospitalized heart failure patients, lower concentrations of SELENOP were associated with higher prevalence of anaemia.

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  • 19.
    Katra, Pernilla
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Hennings, Viktoria
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Nilsson, Jan
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Engström, Gunnar
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Engelbertsen, Daniel
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Björkbacka, Harry
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Malmö, SE-20213 Malmö, Sweden..
    Plasma levels of CCL21, but not CCL19, independently predict future coronary events in a prospective population-based cohort2023In: Atherosclerosis, ISSN 0021-9150, E-ISSN 1879-1484, Vol. 366, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and aims: The homeostatic chemokines CCL21 and CCL19 have been explored as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease prediction in patients with established cardiovascular disease, but associations between these chemokines and first-time coronary event incidence have not been investigated before. Here, we explored associations between CCL21 or CCL19 and first-time incident coronary events in the general population-based Malmo spacing diaeresis Diet and Cancer cohort with two decades of follow-up.Methods: CCL21 and CCL19 levels in plasma were analysed with ELISA and proximity extension assay and as-sociations with disease incidence were explored with conditional logistic regression in a nested case-control cohort (CCL21; n = 676) and with Cox regression in a population-based cohort (CCL19; n = 4636).Results: High CCL21 levels in plasma were associated with incident first-time coronary events independently of traditional risk factors (odds ratio of 2.64 with 95% confidence interval 1.62-4.31, p < 0.001, comparing the highest versus the lowest tertile of CCL21), whereas CCL19 was not. CCL19 was, however, associated with incident heart failure, as well as increased all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality independently of age and sex.Conclusions: Even though CCL21 and CCL19 both signal through CCR7, these chemokines may not be inter-changeable as disease predictors and CCL21 could be used for prediction of future coronary events in individuals without any previous coronary heart disease history.

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  • 20.
    Kurdie, Rayane
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Vortex formation time hos yngre kvinnliga handbollsspelare2022Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term intensive training contributes to an increase in heart mass, dilatation of the left ventricle and increased left ventricular walls. Depending on the type of exercise being performed, different morphological forms of athlete’s heart can be distinguished. However, the functional and structural changes that occur in the heart during long-term intensive training may be difficult to distinguish from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and dilated cardiomyopathy that have similar morphological characteristics. It is therefore necessary to develop new methods of screening in athletes to distinguish the adaptation that occurs during long-term intensive training and pathological changes. One of the new methods which has this potential is vortex formation time (VFT). During the early filling phase in diastole, a rotating vortex ring forms in the left ventricle. VFT is a dimensionless index that is used to quantify the process of the vortex ring. Earlier, VFT has been studied in patients with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. This study examined the difference in VFT in younger female handball players and a healthy control group. During early diastole, a rotating vortex ring forms in the left ventricle. VFT is a dimensionless index used to quantify the process of vortex formation. VFT was calculated by the formula: 4 × (1 − β)/π × α3 × LVEF, where α is the end-diastolic volume (EDV)1/3 divided by the annulus mitral diameter during early diastole and β is the fraction of the volume contributed by the atrial contraction divided by the total inflow through mitral valve. This study showed a significant difference (p=0,025) in VFT between handball players and the control group. 

  • 21.
    Lampridou, Smaragda
    et al.
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Saghdaoui, Layla Bolton
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Bicknell, Colin
    Vascular Surgery Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK; Faculty of Medicine, Department of Surgery & Cancer, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Kumlien, Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, 214 28 Malmö, Sweden.
    Lear, Rachael
    NIHR Imperial Biomedical Research Centre, Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London, London, UK.
    Health Related Quality of Life Following Intervention for Thoracoabdominal Aortic Aneurysm: a Systematic Review and Narrative Synthesis2024In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0890-5096, E-ISSN 1615-5947, Vol. 101, p. 105-119, article id S0890-5096(23)00860-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysms (TAAA) pose significant risks of morbidity and mortality. Considering the evolving techniques for TAAA intervention and the growing interest in quality of life (QoL) outcomes for decision-making, we aimed to evaluate the impact of patient and perioperative characteristics on short-, medium-, and long-term post-operative QoL in TAAA repair patients.

    METHODS: A systematic search was conducted in CINAHL, APA PsycINFO, EMBASE, Medline and Cochrane to identify primary research studies evaluating QoL post TAAA surgery, published in English or Swedish between 01 January 2012 and 26 September 2022. A narrative synthesis was reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. The quality of evidence was assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme and Joanna Briggs Institute checklists.

    RESULTS: Eight studies of low or moderate quality with 455 patients were included. Preoperative QoL in TAAA patients was lower compared to the general population. While there is an initial short-term improvement in post-operative QoL, patients fail to reach baseline levels even after seven years, with physical activity and functioning domains being particularly affected. Experiencing post-operative complications, including paraplegia and cardiovascular events, negatively impacts post-operative QoL. Patients with uncomplicated postoperative status had improved QoL. Prolonged hospital stay negatively affects physical functioning.

    CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with TAAA are likely to have lower baseline QoL compared to the general population. Following TAAA repair, post-operative QoL may remain lower than baseline levels, persisting over the long-term. Comorbidities, post-operative complications, and hospitalisation duration appear to exert adverse effects on post-operative QoL.

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  • 22.
    Lundqvist, Michelle
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Användande av myocardial performance index vid bedömning av vänster och höger kammares systoliska och diastoliska funktion2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Vid en ekokardiografisk undersökning läggs fokus främst på klaffunktion, hjärtrumsstorlek och vänstersidans systoliska funktion. Vänstersidans diastoliska funktion har dock börjat få större betydelse, men upplevs ofta vara svårbedömd. Höger kammare har en komplex anatomi med ett trabekulerat myokardie och är otillgängligt placerad i bröstkorgen, vilket gör den svårare att bedöma än vänster kammare. 1995 publicerades ett index för bedömning av hjärtats kombinerade systoliska och diastoliska funktion, myocardial performance index (MPI). Syftet med studien var att undersöka om MPI kan vara en användbar och kompletterande metod vid bedömning av systolisk och diastolisk funktion i höger respektive vänster kammare. I den aktuella studien ingick 33 personer i åldrarna 21–80. MPI beräknades med pulsad vävnadsdoppler under en hjärtcykel. MPI jämfördes mot traditionella ekokardiografiska mätmetoder som speglar systolisk och diastolisk funktion för vänster respektive höger kammare. Normalfördelnings-, korrelations- och överrensstämmelseanalyser utfördes. För vänstersidig kammarfunktion sågs en signifikant korrelation mellan MPI och MAPSE. Ingen eller dålig överensstämmelse sågs mellan MPI och samtliga traditionella mätmetoder för systolisk funktion. För högersidig kammarfunktion sågs en starkt signifikant korrelation mellan MPI och FAC samt TAPSE. Mindre god överensstämmelse sågs mellan högersidans MPI och FAC samt TAPSE. För MPI och E/e’ sågs ingen signifikant korrelation hos vare sig vänster eller höger kammare och en sämre överensstämmelse än om klassificeringen hade gjorts rent slumpmässigt. Användbarheten av MPI för bedömning av vänster kammarfunktion anses, baserat på aktuell studie, vara låg. MPI kan vara användbart vid bedömning av höger kammares systoliska funktion, men inte avseende diastolisk funktion.

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  • 23.
    Malmgren, A.
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Malmö, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Med Imaging & Physiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Trägårdh, E.
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Malmö, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Med Imaging & Physiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Gudmundsson, Petri
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Kjellström, B.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Lund, Clin Physiol, Lund, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Lund, Sweden..
    Stagmo, M.
    Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Dencker, M.
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Malmö, Sweden.;Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Med Imaging & Physiol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Electrocardiographic manifestations in female team handball players: analyzing ECG changes in athletes2024In: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 6, p. 1-8, article id 1384483Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Long-term intense training leads to structural, functional, and electrical remodeling of the heart. How different sports affect the heart has not been fully investigated, particularly for female athletes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the morphology of 12-lead resting electrocardiogram (ECG) in elite female handball players compared to non-athlete female subjects. Potential changes will be explored to see if they could be explained by differences in cardiac dimensions and exercise hours.

    Materials and methods: A cross-sectional study of 33 elite female team handball players compared to 33 sex and age-matched, non-athletic controls (age range 18-26 years) was performed. All participants underwent a resting 12-lead ECG and an echocardiographic examination. ECG variables for left ventricular hypertrophy and durations were evaluated and adjusted for cardiac dimensions and exercise hours using ANCOVA analysis. A linear regression analysis was used to describe relation between echocardiographic and ECG measures and exercise hours.

    Results: The female handball players had larger cardiac dimensions and significantly lower heart rate and QTc duration (Bazett's formula) as well as increased QRS and QT durations compared to controls. The 12-lead sum of voltage and the 12-lead sum of voltage & lowast; QRS were significantly higher among handball players. Changes in ECG variables reflecting the left ventricle could in part be explained by left ventricular size and exercise hours. Correlation with exercise hours were moderately strong in most of the echocardiographic measures reflecting left ventricular (LV), left ventricular mass (LVM), left atrium (LA) and right atrium (RA) size. Poor to fair correlations were seen in the majority of ECG measures.

    Conclusions: Female team handball players had altered ECGs, longer QRS and QT durations, higher 12-lead sum of voltage and 12-lead sum of voltage & lowast; QRS as well as shorter QTc (Bazett's formula) duration compared to non-athletic controls. These findings could only partly be explained by differences in left ventricular size. Despite larger atrial size in the athletes, no differences in P-wave amplitude and duration were found on ECG. This suggest that both structural, and to some degree electrical remodeling, occur in the female team handball players' heart and highlight that a normal ECG does not rule out structural adaptations. The present study adds knowledge to the field of sports cardiology regarding how the heart in female team handball players adapts to this type of sport.

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  • 24.
    Maric, Selma
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Lind, Tania Kjellerup
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Raida, Manfred Roman
    Singapore Lipidomics Incubator (SLING), Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, CRC, Box 50332, 212 13, Malmö, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin
    Dept. of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, CRC, Box 50332, 212 13, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rogers, Sarah
    ISIS Science and Technology Facilities Council, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX, United Kingdom.
    Moulin, Martine
    Life Science Group, Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Haertlein, Michael
    Life Science Group, Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France.
    Forsyth, V. Trevor
    Life Science Group, Institut Laue Langevin, 6, rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156, F-38042, Grenoble, Cedex 9, France; Faculty of Natural Science and Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG, United Kingdom.
    Wenk, Markus R.
    Singapore Lipidomics Incubator (SLING), Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore, Singapore.
    Pomorski, Thomas Guenther
    Dept. of Plant and Environmental Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871, Frederiksberg C, Denmark; Dept. of Molecular Biochemistry, Ruhr University Bochum, Faculty of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 44780, Bochum, Germany.
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Lund, Reidar
    Dept. of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Blindern, 0315, Oslo, Norway.
    Cárdenas, Marité
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering as a probe for the dynamics of lipid exchange between human lipoproteins and naturally derived membranes2019In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 7591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atherosclerosis is the main killer in the western world. Today's clinical markers include the total level of cholesterol and high-/low-density lipoproteins, which often fails to accurately predict the disease. The relationship between the lipid exchange capacity and lipoprotein structure should explain the extent by which they release or accept lipid cargo and should relate to the risk for developing atherosclerosis. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and tailored deuteration have been used to follow the molecular lipid exchange between human lipoprotein particles and cellular membrane mimics made of natural, "neutron invisible" phosphatidylcholines. We show that lipid exchange occurs via two different processes that include lipid transfer via collision and upon direct particle tethering to the membrane, and that high-density lipoprotein excels at exchanging the human-like unsaturated phosphatidylcholine. By mapping the specific lipid content and level of glycation/oxidation, the mode of action of specific lipoproteins can now be deciphered. This information can prove important for the development of improved diagnostic tools and in the treatment of atherosclerosis.

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  • 25.
    Mulholland, Megan
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiovasc Res Immune Regulat, Malmö, Sweden..
    Depuydt, Marie A. C.
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Acad Ctr Drug Res, Div Biotherapeut, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Jakobsson, Gabriel
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Canc Immunol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Ljungcrantz, Irena
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiovasc Res Immune Regulat, Malmö, Sweden..
    Grentzmann, Andrietta
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiovasc Res Immune Regulat, Malmö, Sweden..
    To, Fong
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Cardiovasc Res Matrix & Inflammat At, Malmö, Sweden..
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Cardiovasc Res Matrix & Inflammat At, Malmö, Sweden..
    Gyllenbäck, Elin Jaensson
    Cantargia AB, Lund, Sweden..
    Grönberg, Caitriona
    Cantargia AB, Lund, Sweden..
    Rattik, Sara
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiovasc Res Immune Regulat, Malmö, Sweden.;Cantargia AB, Lund, Sweden..
    Liberg, David
    Cantargia AB, Lund, Sweden..
    Schiopu, Alexandru
    Lund Univ, Dept Translat Med, Canc Immunol, Malmö, Sweden..
    Björkbacka, Harry
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci Cardiovasc Res Cellular Metab & Infl, Malmö, Sweden..
    Kuiper, Johan
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Acad Ctr Drug Res, Div Biotherapeut, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Bot, Ilze
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Acad Ctr Drug Res, Div Biotherapeut, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Slütter, Bram
    Leiden Univ, Leiden Acad Ctr Drug Res, Div Biotherapeut, Leiden, Netherlands..
    Engelbertsen, Daniel
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Cardiovasc Res Immune Regulat, Malmö, Sweden..
    Interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein blockade limits the development of atherosclerosis and reduces plaque inflammation2024In: Cardiovascular Research, ISSN 0008-6363, E-ISSN 1755-3245, Vol. 120, no 6, p. 581-595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein (IL1RAP) is a co-receptor required for signalling through the IL-1, IL-33, and IL-36 receptors. Using a novel anti-IL1RAP-blocking antibody, we investigated the role of IL1RAP in atherosclerosis.

    Methods and results: Single-cell RNA sequencing data from human atherosclerotic plaques revealed the expression of IL1RAP and several IL1RAP-related cytokines and receptors, including IL1B and IL33. Histological analysis showed the presence of IL1RAP in both the plaque and adventitia, and flow cytometry of murine atherosclerotic aortas revealed IL1RAP expression on plaque leucocytes, including neutrophils and macrophages. High-cholesterol diet fed apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe-/-) mice were treated with a novel non-depleting IL1RAP-blocking antibody or isotype control for the last 6 weeks of diet. IL1RAP blockade in mice resulted in a 20% reduction in subvalvular plaque size and limited the accumulation of neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages in plaques and of T cells in adventitia, compared with control mice. Indicative of reduced plaque inflammation, the expression of several genes related to leucocyte recruitment, including Cxcl1 and Cxcl2, was reduced in brachiocephalic arteries of anti-IL1RAP-treated mice, and the expression of these chemokines in human plaques was mainly restricted to CD68+ myeloid cells. Furthermore, in vitro studies demonstrated that IL-1, IL-33, and IL-36 induced CXCL1 release from both macrophages and fibroblasts, which could be mitigated by IL1RAP blockade.

    Conclusion: Limiting IL1RAP-dependent cytokine signalling pathways in atherosclerotic mice reduces plaque burden and plaque inflammation, potentially by limiting plaque chemokine production.

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  • 26.
    Nezami, Zainu
    et al.
    Department of Internal Medicine, Sweden Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Holm, Hannes
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Ohlsson, Marcus
    Department of Internal Medicine, Sweden Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden; Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Molvin, John
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Korduner, Johan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Bachus, Erasmus
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Zaghi, Amir
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Dieden, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Platonov, Pyotr G
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Jujic, Amra
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Martin
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Cardiology, Lund University, Skane University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden; Wallenberg Center for Molecular Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Hypertension in Africa Research Team (HART), North West University Potchefstroom, Potchefstroom, South Africa.
    The impact of myocardial fibrosis biomarkers in a heart failure population with atrial fibrillation-The HARVEST-Malmö study.2022In: Frontiers in cardiovascular medicine, ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 9, article id 982871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Several studies suggest that circulating biomarkers of myocardial fibrosis are associated with worse prognosis in subjects with atrial fibrillation (AF). Here, we aimed to explore associations between fibrosis biomarkers, prevalent AF, and left atrial volume (LAV) enlargement in subjects with heart failure (HF). Additionally, we evaluated the prognostic impact of fibrotic biomarkers in HF with co-existing AF.

    Materials and methods: Patients hospitalized for HF (n = 316, mean age 75 years; 30% women) were screened for AF. Seven proteins previously associated with myocardial fibrosis [metalloproteinase inhibitor 4 (TIMP-4), suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (ST-2), galectin-3 (GAL-3), growth/differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), and matrix metalloproteinase 2, 3, and 9 (MMP-3, MMP-3, and MMP-9, respectively)] were analyzed using a proximity extension assay. Proteins with significant Bonferroni-corrected associations with mortality and re-hospitalization risk were taken forward to multivariable Cox regression analyses. Further, Bonferroni-corrected multivariable logistic regression models were used to study associations between protein plasma levels, prevalent AF, and severely enlarged left atrial volume index (LAVI ≥ 48 ml/m2).

    Results: Prevalent AF was observed in 194 patients at the hospitalization of whom 178 (92%) were re-hospitalized and 111 (57%) died during the follow-up period. In multivariable logistic regression models, increased plasma levels of TIMP-4, GDF-15, and ST-2 were associated with the prevalence of AF, whereas none of the seven proteins showed any significant association with severely enlarged LAVI. Increased plasma levels of five proteins yielded significant associations with all-cause mortality in patients with co-existing AF; TIMP-4 (HR 1.33; CI95% 1.07-1.66; p = 0.010), GDF-15 (HR 1.30; CI95% 1.05-1.62; p = 0.017), GAL-3 (HR 1.29; CI95% 1.03-1.61; p = 0.029), ST-2 (HR 1.48; CI95% 1.18-1.85; p < 0.001), and MMP-3 (HR 1.33; CI95% 1.09-1.63; p = 0.006). None of the proteins showed any significant association with re-hospitalization risk.

    Conclusion: In this study, we were able to demonstrate that elevated levels of three plasma proteins previously linked to myocardial fibrosis are associated with prevalent AF in a HF population. Additionally, higher levels of five plasma proteins yielded an increased risk of mortality in the HF population with or without co-existing AF.

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  • 27.
    Nilsson, Jan
    et al.
    Department of Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, S-205 02, Malmö, Sweden.
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS). Department of Medicine, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, S-205 02, Malmö, Sweden.
    Atherosclerosis2004In: Autoimmunity, ISSN 0891-6934, E-ISSN 1607-842X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 351-355Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Nyman, Johan
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Vascular Center, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Acosta, Stefan
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Vascular Center, Department of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Monsen, Christina
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Allied Health Professions, Skåne University Hospital, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Unit of Vascular Surgery, Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hasselmann, Julien
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
    Rezk, Francis
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, Unit of Vascular Surgery, Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV). Jönköping Academy, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Patients' Experiences Using Closed Incision Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Dressing After Infra-Inguinal Vascular Surgery2022In: Journal of patient experience, ISSN 2374-3735, Vol. 9, article id 23743735221112595Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The PICO™ dressing utilizes incisional negative pressure wound therapy in reducing surgical site infection after vascular surgery; however, no patient-reported investigations are available. The objective was to explore patientś experiences wearing the PICO™ dressing for 7 days. Nine men and 6 women were interviewed, and analysis was conducted using qualitative content analysis. The PICO™ dressing system was well accepted by most patients. Most prominent problems were fear of dropping the pump to the floor, lack of information, and initial feelings of uncertainty. Four patients who had the PICO™ and standard dressing in opposite groins simultaneously, preferred the PICO™ dressing.

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  • 29.
    Qbeia, Safaa
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Jämförelse mellan två mätmetoder för qrs-duration i vila och maxbelastning vid arbetsprov2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Elektrokardiografi är en medicinsk teknik som används för att registrera hjärtats elektriska aktivitet. QRS-tiden avspeglar hur snabbt kammarmuskulaturen depolariseras. QRS-tiden mäts från början av Q-vågen till slutet av S-vågen och har ett normalt värde som ligger på <120 millisekunder (ms) hos vuxna. Ett breddökat QRS-komplex (>120 ms) kan uppstå på grund av defekta retledningsbanor som vänstersidigt skänkelblock/högersidigt skänkelblock då kammarnas depolarisation sker långsammare. QRS-tiden kan även förlängas vid användning av vissa antiarytmiska läkemedel som Tambocor. Många studier har visat att Tambocor kan medföra en viss QRS-breddökning vid fysisk ansträngning. QRS-breddökning är en avgörande prognostisk markör för Tambocor-utsättning eller dosjustering då en förlängd QRS-tid kan leda till livshotande arytmier såsom ventrikelflimmer. I studien utfördes QRS-mätningar på friska patienter, patienter med Tambocor-behandling och patienter med vänstersidigt/högersidigt skänkelblock. Syftet med studien var att undersöka om QRS-tiden i vila och maxbelastning vid arbetsprov skiljer sig statistiskt och kliniskt åt när mätning sker med två olika metoder. QRS-mätning med båda metoderna utfördes digitalt via ECView program. Metod 1 baserade på att välja ett QRS-komplex som ser bredast ut och har bra teknisk kvalitet för att kunna mäta på. Metod 2 baserade på att mäta på avledningen som har tidigast Q och på avledningen som har senast S. Resultatet visade en stark positiv korrelation mellan metoderna både i vila och vid maxbelastning. One sample T test visade att metod 2 ger signifikant högre värde än metod 1. Bland-Altman diagram visade en god överenstämmelse mellan metoderna. Resultatet visade även att det kliniska beslutet för medicinutsättning/dosjustering hade påverkats hos två patienter med Tambocor-behandling beroende på vilken metod som används. Slutsatsen är att metoderna skiljer sig signifikant åt och fler studier behövs för att bekräfta om skillnaden är klinisk signifikant

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  • 30. Risérus, U
    et al.
    Basu, S
    Jovinge, S
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Ärnlöv, J
    Vessby, B
    Supplementation With Conjugated Linoleic Acid Causes Isomer-Dependent Oxidative Stress and Elevated C-Reactive Protein: A Potential Link to Fatty Acid-Induced Insulin Resistance2002In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 106, no 15, p. 1925-1929Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi
    et al.
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.;CIBER Cardiovascular Diseases (CIBERCV), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain (S.S.-B.)..
    Dekkers, Koen F.
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Baldanzi, Gabriel
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Jönsson, Daniel
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.).;Public Dental Service of Skåne, Lund, Sweden (D.J.)..
    Hammar, Ulf
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.;Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.)..
    Lin, Yi-Ting
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.;Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden (Y.-T.L., J.Ä.)..
    Ahmad, Shafqat
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.;Preventive Medicine Division, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (S.A.)..
    Nguyen, Diem
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Varotsis, Georgios
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Pita, Sara
    Clinical Microbiomics A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark (S.P., N.N., A.C.E., J.B.H., H.B.N.).;The Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark (S.P.)..
    Nielsen, Nynne
    Clinical Microbiomics A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark (S.P., N.N., A.C.E., J.B.H., H.B.N.)..
    Eklund, Aron C.
    Clinical Microbiomics A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark (S.P., N.N., A.C.E., J.B.H., H.B.N.)..
    Holm, Jacob B.
    Clinical Microbiomics A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark (S.P., N.N., A.C.E., J.B.H., H.B.N.)..
    Nielsen, H. Bjørn
    Clinical Microbiomics A/S, Copenhagen, Denmark (S.P., N.N., A.C.E., J.B.H., H.B.N.)..
    Ericson, Ulrika
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.)..
    Brunkwall, Louise
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.).;Clinical Studies Sweden, Forum Söder, Region Skåne, Lund, Sweden (L.B.)..
    Ottosson, Filip
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.).;Section for Clinical Mass Spectrometry, Danish Center for Neonatal Screening, Department of Congenital Disorders, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark (F.O.)..
    Larsson, Anna
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.)..
    Ericson, Dan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
    Klinge, Björn
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). DDepartment of Dental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden (B.K.)..
    Nilsson, Peter M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.).;Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden (P.M.N.)..
    Malinovschi, Andrei
    Clinical Physiology (A.M.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Lind, Lars
    Clinical Epidemiology (L.L., J.S.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Bergström, Göran
    Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden (G. Bergström).;Department of Clinical Physiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden (G. Bergström)..
    Sundström, Johan
    Clinical Epidemiology (L.L., J.S.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.;The George Institute for Global Health, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia (J.S.)..
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Department of Neurobiology, Care Science and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden (Y.-T.L., J.Ä.).;School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden (J.Ä.)..
    Engström, Gunnar
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.)..
    Smith, J. Gustav
    The Wallenberg Laboratory/Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, Gothenburg University, Sweden (J.G.S.)..
    Orho-Melander, Marju
    Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Sweden (D.J., U.E., L.B., F.O., A.L., P.M.N., G.E., M.O.-M.)..
    Fall, Tove
    Molecular Epidemiology and Science for Life Laboratory (S.S.-B., K.F.D., G. Baldanzi, U.H., Y.-T.L., S.A., D.N., G.V., T.F.), Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden..
    Streptococcus Species Abundance in the Gut Is Linked to Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in 8973 Participants From the SCAPIS Cohort2023In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 148, no 6, p. 459-472Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Gut microbiota have been implicated in atherosclerotic disease, but their relation with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unclear. This study aimed to identify associations between the gut microbiome and computed tomography–based measures of coronary atherosclerosis and to explore relevant clinical correlates.

    METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 8973 participants (50 to 65 years of age) without overt atherosclerotic disease from the population-based SCAPIS (Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study). Coronary atherosclerosis was measured using coronary artery calcium score and coronary computed tomography angiography. Gut microbiota species abundance and functional potential were assessed with shotgun metagenomics sequencing of fecal samples, and associations with coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated with multivariable regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Associated species were evaluated for association with inflammatory markers, metabolites, and corresponding species in saliva.

    RESULTS: The mean age of the study sample was 57.4 years, and 53.7% were female. Coronary artery calcification was detected in 40.3%, and 5.4% had at least 1 stenosis with >50% occlusion. Sixty-four species were associated with coronary artery calcium score independent of cardiovascular risk factors, with the strongest associations observed for Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus oralis subsp oralis (P<1×10–5). Associations were largely similar across coronary computed tomography angiography–based measurements. Out of the 64 species, 19 species, including streptococci and other species commonly found in the oral cavity, were associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma concentrations, and 16 with neutrophil counts. Gut microbial species that are commonly found in the oral cavity were negatively associated with plasma indole propionate and positively associated with plasma secondary bile acids and imidazole propionate. Five species, including 3 streptococci, correlated with the same species in saliva and were associated with worse dental health in the Malmö Offspring Dental Study. Microbial functional potential of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, anaerobic fatty acid β-oxidation, and amino acid degradation were associated with coronary artery calcium score.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of an association of a gut microbiota composition characterized by increased abundance of Streptococcus spp and other species commonly found in the oral cavity with coronary atherosclerosis and systemic inflammation markers. Further longitudinal and experimental studies are warranted to explore the potential implications of a bacterial component in atherogenesis.

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  • 32. Schiopu, A
    et al.
    Bengtsson, Jessica
    Söderberg, Ingrid
    Janciauskiene, S
    Lindgren, S
    Ares, Mikko PS
    Shah, PK
    Carlsson, R
    Nilsson, J
    Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Recombinant Human Antibodies Against Aldehyde-Modified Apolipoprotein B-100 Peptide Sequences Inhibit Atherosclerosis2004In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 110, no 14, p. 2039-2046Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Svensson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Liuba, Petru
    Lund University.
    Wennick, Anne
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV).
    Berghammer, Malin
    The Queen Silvia Children’s Hospital, Gothenburg; University West, Trollhättan.
    "The only thing I wonder is when I will have surgery again": everyday life for children with right ventricle outflow tract anomalies during assessment for heart surgery2023In: Cardiology in the Young, ISSN 1047-9511, E-ISSN 1467-1107, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 396-401Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many children with complex right ventricle outflow tract anomalies such as Tetralogy of Fallot, common arterial trunk, and pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect require repeated heart surgeries early in life, but also later throughout their lifetime, thereby emphasising the importance of careful life-long follow-up. The need for repeated heart surgeries during childhood is recognised as a heavy burden on the child. Optimising the time point for re-intervention is important, since delaying re-intervention for these children can lead to complications such as ventricular arrhythmias, heart failure, and death. To this purpose, thorough pre-operative assessment (henceforth named as assessment) including clinical examination, echocardiography, MRI, and exercise test need to be performed whenever the indication for reoperation is suspected. It is likely to believe that children who are going through this kind of assessment that may lead to heart surgery need extra support. According to previous research, children with complex heart disease fear for the possibility of surgery and the thought of future repeated heart surgery is associated with anxiety. This might have an impact on children's everyday life and in research nowadays involving children with CHD, the focus has changed from survival to how these children experience their everyday life. Earlier studies have shown that they experience physical activities limitation and feelings of isolation, but no study has yet studied how children with right ventricle outflow tract anomalies experience their everyday life. To be able to provide support, studies are needed to explore how these children experience the period from assessment to decision, as well as the months thereafter. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore how children diagnosed with complex right ventricle outflow tract anomalies experience their heart disease and their everyday life during the assessment and after the decision on whether to perform a new cardiac surgery.

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  • 34.
    Teodorescu, Geanina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Kan en lågfetthaltig växtbaserad diet få kranskärlsjukdomar att stagnera eller reversera?2021Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    According to the National Board of Health and Welfare in 2019, cardiovascular disease was the most common cause of death in Sweden and accounted for 31% of all deaths in the country. Acute coronary heart disease belongs to cardiovascular disease and is a common disease that affects both women and men throughout the Western world with the highest mortality as a result. Clinical studies have shown that the Western diet with too high animal protein intake, too high intake of refined sugar and fat is the primary underlying cause of death in cardiovascular disease. The biggest risk factor for coronary heart disease and other heart diseases is arteriosclerosis (atherosclerosis). A plant-based 10% low-fat Whole Food Plant Based Diet (WFPB) has been shown to have a positive effect on the arteriosclerosis process and further on the development of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this project was to investigate through a systematic literature study whether heart disease, especially coronary heart disease (CAD) can be stagnated and / or reversed with the help of a low-fat WFPB diet. The study is based on 10 scientific articles produced from the databases CINAHL, PubMed, Google Scholar and from the reference list of two of the already selected articles. All ten articles included in the literature study were selected through data collection, relevance assessment and quality review. To ensure the quality of the articles, the relevant articles were quality examined on the basis of questions created from a template from the Swedish Agency for Medical and Social Evaluation, SBU. The analyzed measurement parameters in the articles were for example angiography parameters, lipid biomarkers, angina symptoms, Flow-mediated vasodilation test (FMD) and Positron emission tomography (PET). Most of the studies examined showed reversal of CAD, two articles showed both reversal and stagnation and one article could not be assessed. Stagnation or reversal of coronary heart disease can be achieved either through a combination of dietary intervention and other lifestyle changes in addition to lipid-lowering medical treatment or through dietary and other lifestyle changes only.

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  • 35.
    Tomas, Lukas
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Katra, Pernilla
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Badn, Wiaam
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Andersson, Linda
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Nilsson, Jan
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Schiopu, Alexandru
    Department of Translational Medicine, Lund University , Malmö , Sweden;Department of Internal Medicine, Skåne University Hospital , Lund , Sweden.
    Engelbertsen, Daniel
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Gonçalves, Isabel
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden;Department of Cardiology, Skåne University Hospital , Malmö , Sweden.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Björkbacka, Harry
    Department of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University , Jan Waldenströms gata 35, SE-214 28, Malmö , Sweden.
    Invariant natural killer T cells and incidence of first-time coronary events: a nested case-control study2023In: European Heart Journal Open, E-ISSN 2752-4191, Vol. 3, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells, a T cell subset that is CD1d-restricted and expresses a semi-invariant T cell receptor, have been proposed to contribute to dyslipidaemia-driven cardiovascular disease due to their ability to specifically recognize lipid antigens. Studies in mice have attributed pro-atherogenic properties to iNKT cells, but studies in humans investigating associations of iNKT cells with incident coronary events (CE) are lacking.

    Methods and results: Here, we used flow cytometry to enumerate circulating iNKT cells (CD3+ CD1d-PBS57-Tetramer+) in a case-control cohort nested within the prospective population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer Study (n = 416) to explore associations with incident first-time CE during a median follow-up of 14 years. We found a significant inverse association between CD4- and CD8- double negative (DN) iNKT cells and incident CE, with an odds ratio of 0.62 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38-0.99; P = 0.046] comparing the highest vs. the lowest tertile of DN iNKT cells. The association remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors with an odds ratio of 0.57 (95% CI 0.33-0.99; P = 0.046). In contrast, total iNKT cells were not significantly associated with incident CE after adjustment, with an odds ratio of 0.74 (95% CI 0.43-1.27; P = 0.276).

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that animal studies suggesting an atherosclerosis-promoting role for iNKT cells may not translate to human cardiovascular disease as our data show an association between high circulating numbers of DN iNKT cells and decreased risk of incident CE.

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  • 36.
    Zaghi, Amir
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Holm, Hannes
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Korduner, Johan
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Internal Med, Malmo, Sweden..
    Dieden, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Molvin, John
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmo, Sweden..
    Bachus, Erasmus
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden..
    Jujic, Amra
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Lund Univ Diabet Ctr, Malmo, Sweden..
    Magnusson, Martin
    Lund Univ, Dept Clin Sci, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Skane Univ Hosp, Dept Cardiol, Malmo, Sweden.;Lund Univ, Wallenberg Ctr Mol Med, Lund, Sweden.;Northwest Univ, Hypertens Africa Res Team, Potchefstroom, South Africa..
    Physical Inactivity Is Associated With Post-discharge Mortality and Re-hospitalization Risk Among Swedish Heart Failure Patients-The HARVEST-Malmö Study2022In: Frontiers in Cardiovascular Medicine, E-ISSN 2297-055X, Vol. 9, article id 843029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundSeveral studies have examined the role of physical activity as a predictor of heart failure (HF) mortality and morbidity. Here, we aimed to evaluate the role of self-reported physical activity as an independent risk factor of post-discharge mortality and re-hospitalization in patients hospitalized for HF, as well as study the association between physical activity and 92 plasma proteins associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). MethodsFour-hundred-and-thirty-four patients hospitalized for HF (mean age 75 years; 32% women) were screened for physical activity derived from questionnaires in the Swedish national public health survey. The median follow-up time to death and re-hospitalization was 835 (interquartile range, 390-1,432) and 157 (43-583) days, respectively. Associations between baseline reported physical activity, mortality and re-hospitalization risk were analyzed using multivariable Cox regression analysis. Plasma samples from 295 study participants were analyzed with a proximity extension assay consisting of 92 proteins. Associations between proteins and physical activity were explored using a false discovery rate of <5%, and significant associations were taken forward to multivariate analyses. ResultsIn the multivariate Cox regression model, physical inactivity, defined as physical activity time <1 h throughout the week was associated with increased risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.71; CI95% 1.26-2.31; p = 5.9 x 10(-4)) as well as all-cause re-hospitalization (HR 1.27; CI95% 1.01-1.60; p = 0.038). Further, physical inactivity was associated with elevated plasma levels of Metalloproteinase inhibitor 4, Soluble interleukin 1 receptor-like 1, Elafin and Transferrin receptor protein 1, which are implicated in myocardial fibrosis, migration and apoptosis. ConclusionsSelf-reported low weekly physical activity is associated with increased risk of mortality and re-hospitalization in patients hospitalized for HF independent of traditional risk factors. Furthermore, physical inactivity was associated with elevated levels of 4 proteins linked to cardiovascular disease.

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  • 37.
    Östbring, Malin Johansson
    et al.
    Linnaeus University; Region Kalmar County.
    Eriksson, Tommy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Petersson, Göran
    Linnaeus University.
    Hellström, Lina
    Linnaeus University; Region Kalmar County.
    Effects of a pharmaceutical care intervention on clinical outcomes and patient adherence in coronary heart disease: the MIMeRiC randomized controlled trial2021In: BMC Cardiovascular Disorders, ISSN 1471-2261, E-ISSN 1471-2261, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 367Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the treatment of coronary heart disease, secondary prevention goals are still often unmet and poor adherence to prescribed drugs has been suggested as one of the reasons. We aimed to investigate whether pharmaceutical care by a pharmacist at the cardiology clinic trained in motivational interviewing improves clinical outcomes and patient adherence.

    METHODS: This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, outcomes-blinded trial designed to compare pharmaceutical care follow-up with standard care. After standard follow-up at the cardiology clinic, patients in the intervention group were seen by a clinical pharmacist two to five times as required over seven months. Pharmacists were trained to use motivational interviewing in the consultations and they tailored their support to each patient's clinical needs and beliefs about medicines. The primary study end-point was the proportion of patients who reached the treatment goal for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 12 months after discharge. The key secondary outcome was patient adherence to lipid-lowering therapy at 15 months after discharge, and other secondary outcomes were the effects on patient adherence to other preventive drugs, systolic blood pressure, disease-specific quality of life, and healthcare use.

    RESULTS: 316 patients were included. The proportion of patients who reached the target for low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were 37.0% in the intervention group and 44.2% in the control group (P = .263). More intervention than control patients were adherent to cholesterol-lowering drugs (88 vs 77%; P = .033) and aspirin (97 vs 91%; P = .036) but not to beta-blocking agents or renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors.

    CONCLUSIONS: Our intervention had no positive effects on risk factors for CHD, but it increased patient adherence. Further investigation of the intervention process is needed to explore the difference in results between patient adherence and medication effects. Longer follow-up of healthcare use and mortality will determine if the increased adherence per se eventually will have a meaningful effect on patient health.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02102503, 03/04/2014 retrospectively registered.

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