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  • 1.
    Aleksejeva, Olga
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Nilsson, Nicklas
    Obducat Technol AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden..
    Genevskiy, Vladislav
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Thulin, Kristian
    Obducat Technol AB, S-22363 Lund, Sweden..
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Photobioanodes Based on Nanoimprinted Electrodes and Immobilized Chloroplasts2022In: ChemElectroChem, E-ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As the global energy demand continues to increase, the interest in photosynthetic energy conversion is growing accordingly. Chloroplasts, photosynthetic organelles present in plants and algae, are attractive candidates for construction of bio solar cells; however, they have been less studied because of their complex membrane system, which restricts electrochemical communication with an electrode surface. Nevertheless, in this work photobioanodes based on planar and nanoimprinted gold substrates modified with chloroplasts were designed and evaluated. Apparently, nanoimprint lithography contributed to higher photocurrent densities, not only owing to the enlarged real surface area, but also due to boosting electrochemical communication between the photosynthetic organelles and the electrode. Combining chloroplast-modified nanoimprinted gold electrodes with a capacitive part made of a planar gold substrate, coated with a conductive polymer, resulted in a dual-feature photobioanode providing a lower open-circuit potential, i. e., -0.11 V vs. Ag|AgCl|KClsat, and an enhanced capacitance of ca. 37 F m(-2) upon illumination of 400 W m(-2).

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  • 2.
    Aleksejeva, Olga
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sokolov, A. V.
    Russia Saint-Petersburg State University, Russia.
    Marquez, I.
    University of Seville, Spain.
    Gustafsson, Anna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Bushnev, S.
    Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Eriksson, Håkan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ljunggren, Lennart
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia.
    Autotolerant ceruloplasmin based biocathodes for implanted biological power sources2021In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High-performance autotolerant bioelectrodes should be ideally suited to design implantable bioelectronic devices. Because of its high redox potential and ability to reduce oxygen directly to water, human ceruloplasmin, HCp, the only blue multicopper oxidase present in human plasma, appears to be the ultimate biocatalyst for oxygen biosensors and also biocathodes in biological power sources. In comparison to fungal and plant blue multicopper oxidases, e.g. Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase and Rhus vernicifera laccase, respectively, the inflammatory response to HCp in human blood is significantly reduced. Partial purification of HCp allowed to preserve the native conformation of the enzyme and its biocatalytic activity. Therefore, electrochemical studies were carried out with the partially purified enzyme immobilised on nanostructured graphite electrodes at physiological pH and temperature. Amperometric investigations revealed low reductive current densities, i.e. about 1.65 µA cm−2 in oxygenated electrolyte and in the absence of any mediator, demonstrating nevertheless direct electron transfer based O2 bioelectroreduction by HCp for the first time. The reductive current density obtained in the mediated system was about 12 µA cm−2. Even though the inflammatory response of HCp is diminished in human blood, inadequate bioelectrocatalytic performance hinders its use as a cathodic bioelement in a biofuel cell.

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  • 3.
    Ambaw, Y. A.
    et al.
    Precision Medicine Translational Research Programme and Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore; SLING, Singapore Lipidomics Incubator, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore; Department of Molecular Metabolism, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.
    Dahl, S. R.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo, Norway; Hormone Laboratory, Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, 0424 Oslo, Norway.
    Chen, Y.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo, Norway.
    Greibrokk, T.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo, Norway.
    Lundanes, E.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, 0315 Oslo, Norway.
    Lazraq, Issam
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. School of Consciousness, Dr Vishwanath Karad Maharashtra Institute of Technology–World Peace University, Kothrud, Pune 411038, Maharashtra, India.
    Selvalatchmanan, J.
    Precision Medicine Translational Research Programme and Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore; SLING, Singapore Lipidomics Incubator, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore.
    Wenk, M. R.
    Precision Medicine Translational Research Programme and Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore; SLING, Singapore Lipidomics Incubator, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Torta, F.
    Precision Medicine Translational Research Programme and Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore; SLING, Singapore Lipidomics Incubator, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119077, Singapore.
    Tailored polymer-based selective extraction of lipid mediators from biological samples2021In: Metabolites, ISSN 2218-1989, E-ISSN 2218-1989, Vol. 11, no 8, article id 539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lipid mediators, small molecules involved in regulating inflammation and its resolution, are a class of lipids of wide interest as their levels in blood and tissues may be used to monitor health and disease states or the effect of new treatments. These molecules are present at low levels in biological samples, and an enrichment step is often needed for their detection. We describe a rapid and selective method that uses new low-cost molecularly imprinted (MIP) and non-imprinted (NIP) polymeric sorbents for the extraction of lipid mediators from plasma and tissue samples. The extraction process was carried out in solid-phase extraction (SPE) cartridges, manually packed with the sorbents. After extraction, lipid mediators were quantified by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC–MSMS). Various parameters affecting the extraction efficiency were evaluated to achieve optimal recovery and to reduce non-specific interactions. Preliminary tests showed that MIPs, designed using the prostaglandin biosynthetic precursor arachidonic acid, could effectively enrich prostaglandins and structurally related molecules. However, for other lipid mediators, MIP and NIP displayed comparable recoveries. Under optimized conditions, the recoveries of synthetic standards ranged from 62% to 100%. This new extraction method was applied to the determination of the lipid mediators concentration in human plasma and mouse tissues and compared to other methods based on commercially available cartridges. In general, the methods showed comparable performances. In terms of structural specificity, our newly synthesized materials accomplished better retention of prostaglandins (PGs), hydroxydocosahexaenoic acid (HDoHE), HEPE, hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE), hydroxyeicosatrienoic acid (HETrE), and PUFA compounds, while the commercially available Strata-X showed a higher recovery for dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (diHETrEs). In summary, our results suggest that this new material can be successfully implemented for the extraction of lipid mediators from biological samples. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

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  • 4. Andoralov, Viktor
    et al.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Flexible micro(bio)sensors for quantitative analysis of bioanalytes in a nanovolume of human lachrymal liquid2013In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 405, no 11, p. 3871-3879Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A flexible electrochemical micro(bio)sensor has been designed for determination of several biological compounds, specifically, ascorbate, dopamine, and glucose, in human lachrymal liquid (tears). The microsensor for simultaneous determination of ascorbate and dopamine concentrations was based on a gold microwire modified with the tetrathiafulvalen–7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane complex as a catalyst. To monitor glucose concentration in tears, glucose dehydrogenase was immobilized on a gold microwire modified with carbon nanotubes and an osmium redox polymer. A capillary microcell was constructed for sampling tears. The cell had a working volume of 60–100 nL with a sampling deviation of 6.7 %. To check if the microcell was properly filled with buffer or tear sample, a control electrode was introduced into the construction. The electrode was used to measure the electrical resistance of a fully filled nanovolume cell. The mechanical flexibility is one of the most important features of the prototype and allowed direct collection of tears with minimized risk of damage to the eye.

  • 5.
    Banan, Kamran
    et al.
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut, Tehran, Iran..
    Ghorbani-Bidkorbeh, Fatemeh
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut, Tehran, Iran..
    Afsharara, Hanif
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Pharm, Dept Med Chem, Tehran, Iran..
    Hatamabadi, Dara
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Pharm, Dept Med Chem, Tehran, Iran..
    Landi, Behnaz
    Shahid Beheshti Univ Med Sci, Sch Pharm, Dept Pharmaceut, Tehran, Iran..
    Kecili, Rustem
    Anadolu Univ, Yunus Emre Vocat Sch Hlth Serv, Dept Med Serv & Tech, Eskisehir, Turkey..
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Nano-sized magnetic core-shell and bulk molecularly imprinted polymers for selective extraction of amiodarone from human plasma2022In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 1198, article id 339548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bulk and magnetic core-shell Molecularly Imprinted Polymers (MMIPs) have been introduced and compared to extract and determine amiodarone from a complex matrix, i.e., plasma, due to the importance of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM). Polymer synthesis was confirmed by FTIR, AFM, TGA, DLS, VSM, TEM, and the adsorption studies such as capacity, isothermal models, selectivity, and regeneration were performed to evaluate and compare polymer efficiency in extraction and separation of amiodarone from sample solutions and human plasma. Both nano-sized and bulk polymers successfully extracted the target molecule at the low therapeutic ranges and the overdose concentrations (recoveries of 98.38%-102.70%). The maximum adsorption capacity of the MMIPs was 42.5 mu g/mg compared with 2.6 mu g/mg for bulk polymers. The imprinting factors of the polymers were 15.12 and 6.84 for MMIPs and bulk, respectively. MMIPs and bulk polymers presented 4.68 and 1.66 selectivity factors, respectively, towards amiodarone compared with lidocaine. LOD, LOQ and enrichment factor in human plasma were 0.09, 0.28 mu g mL(-1), and 10 respectively. Recoveries of therapeutic concentration from plasma were 91.38 and 97.33% for bulk and MMIPs, respectively. MMIPs as an adsorbent in amiodarone extraction from plasma offered reduced necessary sample amount, less adsorbent consumption, reduced pretreatment time, and reduced elution solvent waste while yielding higher extraction recovery and more specificity for the target compared with the bulk polymer. Bulk polymers have a more straightforward synthesis procedure due to fewer synthesis steps and fewer variables, and Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Solid-phase Extraction (MIP-SPE) has already been introduced commercially. MMIPs prevail on a small scale, and in the context of a simple extraction, separation, or concentration in large-scale bioanalysis, efforts towards optimization and development of MMIPs can unearth tremendous opportunities for green chemistry principles. 

  • 6. Coman, Vasile
    et al.
    Vaz-Dominguez, Cristina
    Ludwig, Roland
    Harreither, Wolfgang
    Haltrich, Dietmar
    De Lacey, Antonio L.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Gorton, Lo
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    A membrane-, mediator-, cofactor-less glucose/oxygen biofuel cell2008In: Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics, Vol. 10, no 40, p. 6093-6096Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7. Dagys, Marius
    et al.
    Haberska, Karolina
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Kulys, Juozas
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Laccase-gold nanoparticle assisted bioelectrocatalytic reduction of oxygen2010In: Electrochemistry communications, ISSN 1388-2481, E-ISSN 1873-1902, Vol. 12, no 7, p. 933-935Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was found that homogeneous activity of Trametes hirsuta laccase is considerably diminished in the presence of gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs). Heterogeneous electron transfer studies revealed that Au-NPs facilitate direct electron transfer (DET) between the T1 copper site of the laccase and the surface of Au-NP modified electrodes. DET was characterized by the standard heterogeneous ET constant of 0.5 +/- 0.6 s(-1) at Au-NPs with an average diameter of 50 nm. As a consequence of this a well pronounced DET based bioelectrocatalytic oxygen reduction with current densities of 5-30 mu A cm(-2) has been achieved at the laccase-Au-NP modified electrodes.

  • 8.
    Ding, R.
    et al.
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore.
    Joon, N. K.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Ahamed, A.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland; Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Singapore.
    Shafaat, Atefeh
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Guzinski, M.
    Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, USA.
    Wagner, M.
    Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Singapore.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Bobacka, J.
    Åbo Akademi University, Finland.
    Lisak, G.
    Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; Nanyang Environment and Water Research Institute, Singapore.
    Gold-modified paper as microfluidic substrates with reduced biofouling in potentiometric ion sensing2021In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 344, article id 130200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microfluidic sampling media based on paper and its modifications with either gold nanoparticles or sputtered gold were evaluated for potentiometric determination of Na+, K+, and Cl– ions in clinically relevant samples. The measurements were conducted in comparison to other commonly considered microfluidic substrates, i.e. sponge, polyester textile, and polyamide textile. Ion determination was done by using solid-contact ion-selective electrodes based on plasticized PVC membranes for Na+, K+, and Cl– ions and utilizing PEDOT(PSS) or PEDOT(Cl) as the ion-to-electron transducer. The solid-contact ion-selective electrodes and a solid-state reference electrode were placed directly on the substrate into which the sample solution was wicked. Transport of bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the paper substrate was studied by ellipsometry. Modification of the paper substrates by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was found to slow down the transport of BSA through the paper, when compared with unmodified paper substrates and when compared with all the other alternative sampling matrices studied. The retention of BSA obtained with AuNP-modified paper substrates significantly improved the accuracy of the potentiometric ion determinations in sweat, saliva, artificial tears, and artificial serum. The potentiometric results were validated by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and ion chromatography (IC). The study indicates that modification of paper by AuNPs is a feasible approach to reduce biofouling of sensors that are used in the paper-based analysis of clinically relevant samples. © 2021 Elsevier B.V.

  • 9.
    El-Schich, Zahra
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Zhang, Yuecheng
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Göransson, Tommy
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Dizeyi, Nishtman
    Lund University.
    Persson, Jenny L.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Umeå University.
    Johansson, Emil
    Umeå University.
    Caraballo, Remi
    Umeå University.
    Elofsson, Mikael
    Umeå University.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    World Peace University, India.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gjörloff Wingren, Anette
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sialic Acid as a Biomarker Studied in Breast Cancer Cell Lines In Vitro Using Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Polymers2021In: Applied Sciences, E-ISSN 2076-3417, Vol. 11, no 7, article id 3256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sialylations are post-translational modifications of proteins and lipids that play important roles in many cellular events, including cell-cell interactions, proliferation, and migration. Tumor cells express high levels of sialic acid (SA), which are often associated with the increased invasive potential in clinical tumors, correlating with poor prognosis. To overcome the lack of natural SA-receptors, such as antibodies and lectins with high enough specificity and sensitivity, we have used molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), or "plastic antibodies", as nanoprobes. Because high expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) in primary tumors is often associated with proliferation and a more aggressive phenotype, the expression of EpCAM and CD44 was initially analyzed. The SA-MIPs were used for the detection of SA on the cell surface of breast cancer cells. Lectins that specifically bind to the a-2,3 SA and a-2,6 SA variants were used for analysis of SA expression, with both flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Here we show a correlation of EpCAM and SA expression when using the SA-MIPs for detection of SA. We also demonstrate the binding pattern of the SA-MIPs on the breast cancer cell lines using confocal microscopy. Pre-incubation of the SA-MIPs with SA-derivatives as inhibitors could reduce the binding of the SA-MIPs to the tumor cells, indicating the specificity of the SA-MIPs. In conclusion, the SA-MIPs may be a new powerful tool in the diagnostic analysis of breast cancer cells.

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  • 10.
    Esmail Tehrani, Sheida
    et al.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Ctr Nano Fabricat & Characterizat, DTU Nanolab, Orsteds Plads,Bldg 347, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Quang Nguyen, Long
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Ctr Nano Fabricat & Characterizat, DTU Nanolab, Orsteds Plads,Bldg 347, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Garelli, Giulia
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Ctr Nano Fabricat & Characterizat, DTU Nanolab, Orsteds Plads,Bldg 347, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Jensen, Bettina M.
    Copenhagen Univ Hosp Herlev Gentofte, Allergy Clin, Gentofte Hosp Vej 8, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark..
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Emneus, Jenny
    Tech Univ Denmark, Dept Biotechnol & Biomed DTU Bioengn, Bldg 423, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Sylvest Keller, Stephan
    Tech Univ Denmark, Natl Ctr Nano Fabricat & Characterizat, DTU Nanolab, Orsteds Plads,Bldg 347, DK-2800 Lyngby, Denmark..
    Hydrogen Peroxide Detection Using Prussian Blue-modified 3D Pyrolytic Carbon Microelectrodes2021In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2516-2528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A highly sensitive amperometric Prussian blue-based hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed using 3D pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes. A 3D printed multielectrode electrochemical cell enabled simultaneous highly reproducible Prussian blue modification on multiple carbon electrodes. The effect of oxygen plasma pre-treatment and deposition time on Prussian blue electrodeposition was studied. The amperometric response of 2D and 3D sensors to the addition of hydrogen peroxide in mu M and sub-mu M concentrations in phosphate buffer was investigated. A high sensitivity comparable to flow injection systems and a detection limit of 0.16 mu M was demonstrated with 3D pyrolytic carbon microelectrodes at stirred batch condition

  • 11.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Nilsson, Emelie J.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Tudosoiu, Bogdan
    Covercast AB, Drottensgatan 4, 222 23 Lund, Sweden.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wearable Electronic Tongue for Non-Invasive Assessment of Human Sweat2021In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, no 21, article id 7311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweat is a promising biofluid in allowing for non-invasive sampling. Here, we investigate the use of a voltammetric electronic tongue, combining different metal electrodes, for the purpose of non-invasive sample assessment, specifically focusing on sweat. A wearable electronic tongue is presented by incorporating metal electrodes on a flexible circuit board and used to non-invasively monitor sweat on the body. The data obtained from the measurements were treated by multivariate data processing. Using principal component analysis to analyze the data collected by the wearable electronic tongue enabled differentiation of sweat samples of different chemical composition, and when combined with 1H-NMR sample differentiation could be attributed to changing analyte concentrations.

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  • 12.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Psotta, Carolin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Ohlsson, Lars
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Electronic Tongue for Direct Assessment of SARS-CoV-2-Free and Infected Human Saliva-A Feasibility Study2023In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An electronic tongue is a powerful analytical instrument based on an array of non-selective chemical sensors with a partial specificity for data gathering and advanced pattern recognition methods for data analysis. Connecting electronic tongues with electrochemical techniques for data collection has led to various applications, mostly within sensing for food quality and environmental monitoring, but also in biomedical research for the analyses of different bioanalytes in human physiological fluids. In this paper, an electronic tongue consisting of six electrodes (viz., gold, platinum, palladium, titanium, iridium, and glassy carbon) was designed and tested in authentic (undiluted, unpretreated) human saliva samples from eight volunteers, collected before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Investigations of 11 samples using differential pulse voltammetry and a principal component analysis allowed us to distinguish between SARS-CoV-2-free and infected authentic human saliva. This work, as a proof-of-principle demonstration, provides a new perspective for the use of electronic tongues in the field of enzyme-free electrochemical biosensing, highlighting their potential for future applications in non-invasive biomedical analyses.

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  • 13.
    Falk, Magnus
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Psotta, Carolin
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Aptusens AB.
    Cirovic, Stefan
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Aptusens AB.
    Non-Invasive Electrochemical Biosensors Operating in Human Physiological Fluids2020In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 20, no 21, p. 1-28, article id 6352Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-invasive healthcare technologies are an important part of research and development nowadays due to the low cost and convenience offered to both healthcare receivers and providers. This work overviews the recent advances in the field of non-invasive electrochemical biosensors operating in secreted human physiological fluids, viz. tears, sweat, saliva, and urine. Described electrochemical devices are based on different electrochemical techniques, viz. amperometry, coulometry, cyclic voltammetry, and impedance spectroscopy. Challenges that confront researchers in this exciting area and key requirements for biodevices are discussed. It is concluded that the field of non-invasive sensing of biomarkers in bodily fluid is highly convoluted. Nonetheless, if the drawbacks are appropriately addressed, and the pitfalls are adroitly circumvented, the approach will most certainly disrupt current clinical and self-monitoring practices.

  • 14.
    Grasso, Giuliana
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Sommella, Eduardo M
    Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Merciai, Fabrizio
    Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Abouhany, Rahma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar A
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. School of Consciousness, Dr. Vishwanath Karad MIT World Peace University, 411038, Pune, India.
    Campiglia, Pietro
    Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Crescenzi, Carlo
    Department of Pharmacy, University of Salerno, Via Giovanni Paolo II 132, 84084, Fisciano, SA, Italy.
    Enhanced selective capture of phosphomonoester lipids enabling highly sensitive detection of sphingosine 1-phosphate2023In: Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, ISSN 1618-2642, E-ISSN 1618-2650, Vol. 415, no 26, p. 6573-6582Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sphingolipids play crucial roles in cellular membranes, myelin stability, and signalling responses to physiological cues and stress. Among them, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) has been recognized as a relevant biomarker for neurodegenerative diseases, and its analogue FTY-720 has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Focusing on these targets, we here report three novel polymeric capture phases for the selective extraction of the natural biomarker and its analogue drug. To enhance analytical performance, we employed different synthetic approaches using a cationic monomer and a hydrophobic copolymer of styrene-DVB. Results have demonstrated high affinity of the sorbents towards S1P and fingolimod phosphate (FTY-720-P, FP). This evidence proved that lipids containing phosphate diester moiety in their structures did not constitute obstacles for the interaction of phosphate monoester lipids when loaded into an SPE cartridge. Our suggested approach offers a valuable tool for developing efficient analytical procedures.

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  • 15. Heiskanen, Arto
    et al.
    Spegel, Christer
    Kostesha, Natalie
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Emneus, Jenny
    Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Proliferation on Thiol-Modified Planar Gold Microelectrodes Using Impedance Spectroscopy2008In: Langmuir, Vol. 24, no 16, p. 9066-9073Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. Heiskanen, Arto
    et al.
    Spegel, Christer
    Kostesha, Natalie
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Emnéus, Jenny
    Mediator-assisted simultaneous probing of cytosolic and mitochondrial redox activity in living cells2009In: Analytical Biochemistry, ISSN 0003-2697, E-ISSN 1096-0309, Vol. 384, no 1, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work describes an electron transfer mediator-assisted amperometric flow injection method for assessing redox enzyme activity in different subcellular compartments of the phosphoglucose isomerase deletion mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, EBY44. The method is demonstrated using the ferricyanide-menadione double mediator system to study the effect of dicoumarol, an inhibitor of cytosolic and mitochondrial oxidoreductases and an uncoupler of the electron transport chain. Evaluation of the role of NAD(P)H-producing pathways in mediating biological effects is facilitated by introducing either fructose or glucose as the carbon source, yielding either NADH or NADPH through the glycolytic or pentose phosphate pathway, respectively. Respiratory noncompetent cells show greater inhibition of cytosolic menadione-reducing enzymes when NADH rather than NADPH is produced. Spectrophotometric in vitro assays show no difference between the cofactors. Respiratory competent cells show cytosolic inhibition only when NADPH is produced, whereas production of NADH reveals uncoupling at low dicoumarol concentrations and inhibition of complexes III and IV at higher concentrations. Spectrophotometric assays only indicate the presence of cytosolic inhibition regardless of the reduced cofactor used. This article shows the applicability of the amperometric method and emphasizes the significance of determining biological effects of chemicals in living cells.

  • 17.
    Hoang, Van Chinh
    et al.
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). The University of Sydney, Australia.
    Shafaat, Atefeh
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jankovskaja, Skaidre
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gomes, V. G.
    The University of Sydney, Australia.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Franz cells for facile biosensor evaluation: A case of HRP/SWCNT-based hydrogen peroxide detection via amperometric and wireless modes2021In: Biosensors & bioelectronics, ISSN 0956-5663, E-ISSN 1873-4235, Vol. 191, article id 113420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reducing animal use in biosensor research requires broader use of in vitro methods. In this work, we present a novel application of Franz cells suitable for biosensor development and evaluation in vitro. The work describes how Franz cell can be equipped with electrodes enabling characterization of biosensors in close proximity to skin. As an example of a sensor, hydrogen peroxide biosensor was prepared based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)/single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-modified textile. The electrode exhibited lower detection limit of 0.3 μM and sensitivity of 184 μA mM−1 cm−2. The ability of this biosensor to monitor H2O2 penetration through skin and dialysis membranes was evaluated in Franz cell setup in amperometric and wireless modes. The results also show that catalase activity present in skin is a considerable problem for epidermal sensing of H2O2. This work highlights opportunities and obstacles that can be addressed by assessment of biosensors in Franz cell setup before progressing to their testing in animals and humans.

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  • 18.
    Huynh, Chau Minh
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Arribas Díez, Ignacio
    Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Thi, Hien Kim Le
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Jensen, Ole N
    Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M, Denmark.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Irgum, Knut
    Department of Chemistry, Umeå University, S-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
    Terminally Phosphorylated Triblock Polyethers Acting Both as Templates and Pore-Forming Agents for Surface Molecular Imprinting of Monoliths Targeting Phosphopeptides2023In: ACS Omega, E-ISSN 2470-1343, Vol. 8, no 9, p. 8791-8803Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The novel process reported here described the manufacture of monolithic molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using a terminally functionalized block copolymer as the imprinting template and pore-forming agent. The MIPs were prepared through a step-growth polymerization process using a melamine-formaldehyde precondensate in a biphasic solvent system. Despite having a relatively low imprinting factor, the use of MIP monolith in liquid chromatography demonstrated the ability to selectively target desired analytes. An MIP capillary column was able to separate monophosphorylated peptides from a tryptic digest of bovine serum albumin. Multivariate data analysis and modeling of the phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated peptide retention times revealed that the number of phosphorylations was the strongest retention contributor for peptide retention on the monolithic MIP capillary column.

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  • 19.
    Incel, Anıl
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Arribas Díez, Ignacio
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense.
    Wierzbicka, Celina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Gajoch, Katarzyna
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jensen, Ole N
    University of Southern Denmark, Odense.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Selective Enrichment of Histidine Phosphorylated Peptides Using Molecularly Imprinted Polymers2021In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 93, no 8, p. 3857-3866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Protein histidine phosphorylation (pHis) is involved in molecular signaling networks in bacteria, fungi, plants, and higher eukaryotes including mammals and is implicated in human diseases such as cancer. Detailed investigations of the pHis modification are hampered due to its acid-labile nature and consequent lack of tools to study this post-translational modification (PTM). We here demonstrate three molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP)-based reagents, MIP1-MIP3, for enrichment of pHis peptides and subsequent characterization by chromatography and mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The combination of MIP1 and β-elimination provided some selectivity for improved detection of pHis peptides. MIP2 was amenable to larger pHis peptides, although with poor selectivity. Microsphere-based MIP3 exhibited improved selectivity and was amenable to enrichment and detection by LC-MS of pHis peptides in tryptic digests of protein mixtures. These MIP protocols do not involve any acidic solvents during sample preparation and enrichment, thus preserving the pHis modification. The presented proof-of-concept results will lead to new protocols for highly selective enrichment of labile protein phosphorylations using molecularly imprinted materials.

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  • 20.
    Larpant, Nutcha
    et al.
    Biosensors and Bioanalytical Technology for Cells and Innovative Testing Device Research Unit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
    Kalambate, Pramod K
    Biosensors and Bioanalytical Technology for Cells and Innovative Testing Device Research Unit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida
    Biosensors and Bioanalytical Technology for Cells and Innovative Testing Device Research Unit, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand; Department of Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Allied Health Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330, Thailand.
    Paper-Based Competitive Immunochromatography Coupled with an Enzyme-Modified Electrode to Enable the Wireless Monitoring and Electrochemical Sensing of Cotinine in Urine2021In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 21, no 5, article id 1659Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper proposes a combined strategy of using paper-based competitive immunochromatography and a near field communication (NFC) tag for wireless cotinine determination. The glucose oxidase labeled cotinine antibody specifically binds free cotinine in a sample, whereas the unoccupied antibody attached to BSA-cotinine at the test line on a lateral flow strip. The glucose oxidase on the strip and an assistant pad in the presence of glucose generated H2O2 and imposed the Ag oxidation on the modified electrode. This enabled monitoring of immunoreaction by either electrochemical measurement or wireless detection. Wireless sensing was realized for cotinine in the range of 100–1000 ng/mL (R2 = 0.96) in PBS medium. Undiluted urine samples from non-smokers exhibited an Ag-oxidation rate three times higher than the smoker’s urine samples. For 1:8 diluted urine samples (smokers), the proposed paper-based competitive immunochromatography coupled with an enzyme-modified electrode differentiated positive and negative samples and exhibited cotinine discrimination at levels higher than 12 ng/mL. This novel sensing platform can potentially be combined with a smartphone as a reader unit.

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  • 21.
    Li, Qianjin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Shinde, Sudhirkumar
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Grasso, Giuliana
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Caroli, Antonio
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Abouhany, Rahma
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Lanzillotta, Michele
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Pan, Guoqing
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Wan, Wei
    Rurack, Knut
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Selective detection of phospholipids using molecularly imprinted fluorescent sensory core-shell particles2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 9924Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingo-lipid with a broad range of activities coupled to its role in G-protein coupled receptor signalling. Monitoring of both intra and extra cellular levels of this lipid is challenging due to its low abundance and lack of robust affinity assays or sensors. We here report on fluorescent sensory core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) particles responsive to near physiologically relevant levels of S1P and the S1P receptor modulator fingolimod phosphate (FP) in spiked human serum samples. Imprinting was achieved using the tetrabutylammonium (TBA) salt of FP or phosphatidic acid (DPPA·Na) as templates in combination with a polymerizable nitrobenzoxadiazole (NBD)-urea monomer with the dual role of capturing the phospho-anion and signalling its presence. The monomers were grafted from ca 300 nm RAFT-modified silica core particles using ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker resulting in 10-20 nm thick shells displaying selective fluorescence response to the targeted lipids S1P and DPPA in aqueous buffered media. Potential use of the sensory particles for monitoring S1P in serum was demonstrated on spiked serum samples, proving a linear range of 18-60 µM and a detection limit of 5.6 µM, a value in the same range as the plasma concentration of the biomarker.

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  • 22.
    Li, Qianjin
    et al.
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Sch Food Sci & Pharmaceut Engn, Nanjing 210023, Peoples R China..
    Wang, Tingting
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Sch Food Sci & Pharmaceut Engn, Nanjing 210023, Peoples R China..
    Jin, Yu
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Sch Food Sci & Pharmaceut Engn, Nanjing 210023, Peoples R China..
    Wierzbicka, Celina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Wang, Fenying
    Nanchang Univ, Coll Chem, Nanchang 330031, Jiangxi, Peoples R China..
    Li, Jianlin
    Nanjing Normal Univ, Sch Food Sci & Pharmaceut Engn, Nanjing 210023, Peoples R China..
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Synthesis of highly selective molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by a solid-phase imprinting strategy for fluorescence turn-on recognition of phospholipid2022In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 368, article id 132193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are artificial receptors with template tailored recognition sites complementary to the targets. The versatility of this molecular imprinting technique has been hampered by the lack of practical synthetic procedures to prepare highly selective MIP nanoparticles targeting phospholipids, which are challenging to be imprinted due to their amphiphilic structure. Here, a novel sedimentation-based solid phase imprinting strategy is introduced relying on polymerization in the presence of template-modified silica nanospheres (SNs). To demonstrate this concept, the sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor agonist fingolimod phosphate (FP) was coupled to SNs which were dispersed in the prepolymerization medium consisting of the fluorescent functional monomer 1,8-bis(N-vinylimidazol-N'-methyl)anthracene bromide and the crosslinking monomer ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate. High dilution polymerization of the dispersion under agitation followed by simple sedimentation-based separation of the SN template resulted in the isolation of surface imprinted fluorescent MIP nanoparticles (FMIP NPs) in a high yield (17 %). The FMIP NPs displayed fluorescence enhancement in response to the template with a high imprinting factor (IF=9) under the experimental conditions and good specificity, and could recognize FP in human serum with recoveries of 68-74 %. Moreover, the template-modified SNs could be recycled for reuse. Such molecular imprinting strategy opens a new approach to produce highly selective artificial receptors targeting phospholipids.

  • 23.
    Li, Yujing
    et al.
    Division of Building Materials, Lund University, Sweden.
    Wadsö, Lars
    Division of Building Materials, Lund University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Lennart
    Department of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University, Sweden.
    Bjurman, Jonny
    Department of Conservation, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Correlating two methods of quantifying fungal activity: Heat production by isothermal calorimetry and ergosterol amount by gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry2007In: Thermochimica Acta, ISSN 0040-6031, Vol. 458, no 1-2, p. 77-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two methods of quantifying fungal activity have been compared and correlated: isothermal calorimetry for measuring heat production and gas chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (GC–MS/MS) for measuring ergosterol, a proxy for biomass. The measurements were made on four different fungi: Penicillium roqueforti, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Neopetromyces muricatus and the dry rot fungus Serpula lacrymans. The results showed linear correlations between ergosterol production and total heat production for these four fungal species during the initial fast growing stage. At the later stages heat was produced but ergosterol amount was constant. The heat produced per ergosterol amount varied from species to species and between different temperatures. This might be due to the different metabolic efficiencies of different species or the same species at different temperatures. Isothermal calorimetry can be used in fungal studies on its own or in combination with other techniques for a more complete understanding of fungal physiology.

  • 24.
    Liu, Mingquan
    et al.
    Umeå University , Department of Chemistry , S-901 87 Umeå , Sweden.
    Torsetnes, Silje Bøen
    University of Southern Denmark , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences , Campusvej 55 , DK-5230 Odense M , Denmark.
    Wierzbicka, Celina
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Jensen, Ole Nørregaard
    University of Southern Denmark , Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and VILLUM Center for Bioanalytical Sciences , Campusvej 55 , DK-5230 Odense M , Denmark.
    Sellergren, Börje
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Irgum, Knut
    Umeå University , Department of Chemistry , S-901 87 Umeå , Sweden.
    Selective Enrichment of Phosphorylated Peptides by Monolithic Polymers Surface Imprinted with bis-Imidazolium Moieties by UV-Initiated Cryopolymerization2019In: Analytical Chemistry, ISSN 0003-2700, E-ISSN 1520-6882, Vol. 91, no 15, p. 10188-10196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reversible protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is essential for fast, specific, and accurate signal transduction in cells. Up to now, the identification and quantification of phosphorylated amino acids, peptides, and proteins continue to be one of the significant challenges in contemporary bioanalytical research. In this paper, a series of surface grafted monoliths in the capillary format targeting phosphorylated serine has been prepared by first synthesizing a monolithic core substrate material based on trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate, onto which a thin surface-imprinted layer was established by oriented photografting of a variety of mono- and bis-imidazolium host monomers at subzero temperature, using six different continuous or pulsed UV light sources. The imprinted monolith capillaries were evaluated in a capillary liquid chromatographic system connected to a mass spectrometer in order to test the specific retention of phosphorylated peptides. Site-specific recognition selectivity and specificity for phosphorylated serine was demonstrated when separating amino acids and peptides, proving that the optimized materials could be used as novel trapping media in affinity-based phosphoproteomic analysis.

  • 25.
    Psotta, Carolin
    et al.
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Aptusens AB, S-29394 Kyrkhult, Sweden..
    Chaturvedi, Vivek
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Gonzalez-Martinez, Juan F
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Falk, Magnus
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Portable Prussian Blue-Based Sensor for Bacterial Detection in Urine2023In: Sensors, E-ISSN 1424-8220, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bacterial infections can affect the skin, lungs, blood, and brain, and are among the leading causes of mortality globally. Early infection detection is critical in diagnosis and treatment but is a time- and work-consuming process taking several days, creating a hitherto unmet need to develop simple, rapid, and accurate methods for bacterial detection at the point of care. The most frequent type of bacterial infection is infection of the urinary tract. Here, we present a wireless-enabled, portable, potentiometric sensor for E. coli. E. coli was chosen as a model bacterium since it is the most common cause of urinary tract infections. The sensing principle is based on reduction of Prussian blue by the metabolic activity of the bacteria, detected by monitoring the potential of the sensor, transferring the sensor signal via Bluetooth, and recording the output on a laptop or a mobile phone. In sensing of bacteria in an artificial urine medium, E. coli was detected in similar to 4 h (237 +/- 19 min; n = 4) and in less than 0.5 h (21 +/- 7 min, n = 3) using initial E. coli concentrations of similar to 10(3) and 10(5) cells mL(-1), respectively, which is under or on the limit for classification of a urinary tract infection. Detection of E. coli was also demonstrated in authentic urine samples with bacteria concentration as low as 10(4) cells mL(-1), with a similar response recorded between urine samples collected from different volunteers as well as from morning and afternoon urine samples.

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  • 26.
    Rajendran, Sriram Thoppe
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark.
    Huszno, Kinga
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dębowski, Grzegorz
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Boisen, Anja
    Technical University of Denmark,.
    Zór, Kinga
    Technical University of Denmark,.
    Tissue-based biosensor for monitoring the antioxidant effect of orally administered drugs in the intestine2020In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 138, article id 107720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For a better understanding of the effect of drugs and their interaction with cells and tissues, there is a need for in vitro and ex vivo model systems which enables studying these events. There are several in vitro methods available to evaluate the antioxidant activity; however, these methods do not factor in the complex in vivo physiology. Here we present an intestinal tissue modified oxygen electrode, used for the detection of the antioxidant effect of orally administered drugs in the presence of H2O2. Antioxidants are essential in the defense against oxidative stress, more specifically against reactive oxygen species such as H2O2. Due to the presence of native catalase in the intestine, with the tissue-based biosensor we were able to detect H2O2 in the range between 50 and 500 µM. The reproducibility of the sensor based on the calculated relative standard deviations was 15 ± 6%. We found that the O2 production by catalase from H2O2 was reduced in the presence of a well-known antioxidant, quinol. This indirectly detected antioxidant activity was also observed in the case of orally administered drugs with a reported anti-inflammatory effect such as mesalazine and paracetamol, while no antioxidant activity was recorded with aspirin and metformin.

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  • 27.
    Ramonas, Eimantas
    et al.
    Vilnius Univ, Life Sci Ctr, Inst Biochem, Dept Bioanal, Sauletekio Al 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania.;Vilnius Gediminas Tech Univ, Dept Chem & Bioengn, Sauletekio Al 11, LT-10223 Vilnius, Lithuania..
    Butkevicius, Marius
    Vilnius Univ, Life Sci Ctr, Inst Biochem, Dept Bioanal, Sauletekio Al 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania..
    Shleev, Sergey
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Dagys, Marius
    Vilnius Univ, Life Sci Ctr, Inst Biochem, Dept Bioanal, Sauletekio Al 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania..
    Ratautas, Dalius
    Vilnius Univ, Life Sci Ctr, Inst Biochem, Dept Bioanal, Sauletekio Al 7, LT-10257 Vilnius, Lithuania.;Vilnius Gediminas Tech Univ, Dept Chem & Bioengn, Sauletekio Al 11, LT-10223 Vilnius, Lithuania..
    Mechanistic characterization of an oxygen reduction reaction-driven, fully enzymatic and self-calibrating pH biosensor based on wired bilirubin oxidase2022In: Sensors and actuators. B, Chemical, ISSN 0925-4005, E-ISSN 1873-3077, Vol. 367, article id 132054Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important due to high electrochemical potential. Multicopper oxidases (e.g., bilirubin oxidase (BOx)) belong to a class of enzymes that catalyze ORR with low overpotential, and have attracted significant attention in designing bioelectronic devices, viz., biosensors and enzymatic cathodes of biofuel cells. In this work, we present a new concept - an enzyme driven pH electrode system composed of two electrodes: a pH-sensitive BOx-based working electrode and pH-insensitive, a BOx-based reference electrode. ORR-driven pH monitoring was conducted by measuring the potential difference between the two electrodes. Moreover, the electrode system was self-supported and self-calibrating, and no additional electrodes (Pt counter or Ag/AgCl reference) were needed for measurements. The BOx-based pH sensor was tested in continuous and real-time pH monitoring with high accuracy. Also, we present an in-depth mechanistic study explaining the electrode potential-pH dependence, which brings new insights into the operational principle of bilirubin oxidase at different pH.

  • 28.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Amperometric Response from Metabolic Pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells2008Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 29.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Enzyme-Based (Bio)Fuel Cells—Bilirubin Oxidase Use2018In: Encyclopedia of Interfacial Chemistry: Surface Science and Electrochemistry / [ed] Klaus Wandelt, Oxford: Elsevier , 2018, p. 209-216Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Discovered in 1981, bilirubin oxidase (BOD) became an important cathode enzyme in design of biofuel cells (BFCs). Substantial catalytic activity at neutral pH, minor inhibition by chloride ions and high-redox potential of the T1 copper site, being close to the redox potential of oxygen reduction to water, are the advantageous characteristics that distinguish this enzyme from other multicopper oxidases, for example, laccases, used in design of BFC cathodes. This article discusses the basic concept of BFCs and summarizes the achievements and limits which are reached by BFCs with focus on cathodes modified by BOD. Enzymatic cycle in homogeneous media and direct and mediated heterogeneous electron transfer of BOD are briefly summarized.

  • 30.
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    et al.
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Larpant, Nutcha
    Shafaat, Atefeh
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Wireless, Battery-less Biosensors Based on Direct Electron Transfer Reactions2019In: ChemElectroChem, E-ISSN 2196-0216, Vol. 6, no 20, p. 5167-5171Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies of direct electron transfer (DET) between enzymes and electrodes, among other reasons, are aimed at designing the simplest and most efficient biosensor designs. This direction might become especially valuable for the widespread integration of biosensors in Internet-of-Things (IoT) networks. In this Minireview, the simplicity of the design of wireless biosensors based on DET is discussed. It can be concluded that DET allows construction of wireless biosensors, which require no or only a few semiconductor elements. Hopefully, some of these demonstrations will translate into competitive and useful devices strongly promoting biosensing in IoT networks.

  • 31.
    Shafaat, Atefeh
    et al.
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö 205 06, Sweden;Biofilms−Research Center for Biointerfaces, Malmö University, Malmö 205 06, Sweden.
    Žalnėravičius, Rokas
    State Research Institute, Centre for Physical Sciences and Technology, Saulėtekio av. 3, Vilnius LT-10257, Lithuania.
    Ratautas, Dalius
    Institute of Biochemistry, Life Sciences Centre, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 7, Vilnius LT-10223, Lithuania;Faculty of Fundamental Sciences, Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, Saulėtekio al. 11, Vilnius LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Dagys, Marius
    Institute of Biochemistry, Life Sciences Centre, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 7, Vilnius LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Meškys, Rolandas
    Institute of Biochemistry, Life Sciences Centre, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 7, Vilnius LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Rutkienė, Rasa
    Institute of Biochemistry, Life Sciences Centre, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio al. 7, Vilnius LT-10223, Lithuania.
    Gonzalez-Martinez, Juan Francisco
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Neilands, Jessica
    Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Björklund, Sebastian
    Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces.
    Sotres, Javier
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV). Department of Biomedical Science, Faculty of Health and Society, Malmö University, Malmö 205 06, Sweden;Biofilms−Research Center for Biointerfaces, Malmö University, Malmö 205 06, Sweden.
    Glucose-to-Resistor Transduction Integrated into a Radio-Frequency Antenna for Chip-less and Battery-less Wireless Sensing2022In: ACS Sensors , E-ISSN 2379-3694, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 1222-1234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To maximize the potential of 5G infrastructure in healthcare, simple integration of biosensors with wireless tag antennas would be beneficial. This work introduces novel glucose-to-resistor transduction, which enables simple, wireless biosensor design. The biosensor was realized on a near-field communication tag antenna, where a sensing bioanode generated electrical current and electroreduced a nonconducting antenna material into an excellent conductor. For this, a part of the antenna was replaced by a Ag nanoparticle layer oxidized to high-resistance AgCl. The bioanode was based on Au nanoparticle-wired glucose dehydrogenase (GDH). The exposure of the cathode-bioanode to glucose solution resulted in GDH-catalyzed oxidation of glucose at the bioanode with a concomitant reduction of AgCl to highly conducting Ag on the cathode. The AgCl-to-Ag conversion strongly affected the impedance of the antenna circuit, allowing wireless detection of glucose. Mimicking the final application, the proposed wireless biosensor was ultimately evaluated through the measurement of glucose in whole blood, showing good agreement with the values obtained with a commercially available glucometer. This work, for the first time, demonstrates that making a part of the antenna from the AgCl layer allows achieving simple, chip-less, and battery-less wireless sensing of enzyme-catalyzed reduction reaction. 

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  • 32.
    Shleev, Sergey
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Transistor-like behavior of a fungal laccase2008In: Angewandte Chemie, International Edition, Vol. 47, no 38, p. 7270-7274Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Shleev, Sergey
    et al.
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Wang, Yan
    Gorbacheva, Marina
    Christenson, Andreas
    Haltrich, Dietmar
    Ludwig, Roland
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Gorton, Lo
    Direct heterogeneous electron transfer reactions of Bacillus halodurans bacterial blue multicopper oxidase2008In: Electroanalysis, ISSN 1040-0397, E-ISSN 1521-4109, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 963-969Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Spegel, Christer
    et al.
    Heiskanen, Arto
    Pedersen, Simon
    Emneus, Jenny
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö högskola, Faculty of Health and Society (HS).
    Taboryski, Rafael
    Fully automated microchip system for the detection of quantal exocytosis from single and small ensembles of cells2008In: Lab on a Chip, ISSN 1473-0197, E-ISSN 1473-0189, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 323-329Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Tchekwagep, Patrick Marcel Seumo
    et al.
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Eminovski, Jildiz Hamit
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Nanseu-Njiki, Charles Peguy
    Ngameni, Emmanuel
    Arnebrant, Thomas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Ruzgas, Tautgirdas
    Malmö University, Biofilms Research Center for Biointerfaces. Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Biomedical Science (BMV).
    Adsorption of Bovine Serum Albumin on Silver Nanoparticle Layer Deposited on Mercaptohexylpyridinium-Coated Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Gold Electrode: Studied by Electrochemical Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation2020In: Physica Status Solidi (a) applications and materials science, ISSN 1862-6300, E-ISSN 1862-6319, Vol. 217, no 13, article id 1900839Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasing use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in different consumer products provokes interest in understanding interactions of AgNPs with biological molecules, e.g., proteins. The adsorption of AgNPs and bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto self-assembled monolayer of mercaptohexylpyridinium (MHP) on gold surface is described. A quartz crystal microbalance coupled with electrochemical measurements are used to study interactions between AgNPs and BSA. It is found that AgNPs adsorbed on MHP can be considered as highly elastic (stiff) film as the dissipation Delta D approximate to 0. Measurements of the mass loss and the increase in dissipation in parallel with the electrochemical oxidation/reduction of AgNPs shows that albumin adsorption on AgNPs highly diminish electrochemical Ag/AgCl conversion. The formation of a less rigid Ag layer than the original MHP-AgNPs film is also indicated. The 3D assemblies of nanostructures observed with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveal clustering of particles after the redox process.

  • 36.
    Wadsö, Lars
    et al.
    Division of Building Materials, Lund University, Sweden.
    Li, Yujing
    Division of Building Materials, Lund University, Sweden.
    Li, Xi
    Applied Chemistry, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, China.
    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry in the Student Laboratory2011In: Journal of Chemical Education, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is the measurement of the heat produced by the stepwise addition of one substance to another. It is a common experimental technique, for example, in pharmaceutical science, to measure equilibrium constants and reaction enthalpies. We describe a stirring device and an injection pump that can be used with a previously described isothermal calorimeter to perform ITC measurements. Two experiments are also described: an acid−base titration and the binding of Ba2+ to the macrocyclic compound 18-crown-6. These experiments visualize the difference between strong and weak interactions (large and small equilibrium constants) and introduce how reaction enthalpies and equilibrium constants can be calculated from titration calorimetric experiments.

1 - 36 of 36
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