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Overlap of Five Chronic Pain Conditions: Temporomandibular Disorders, Headache, Back Pain, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Fibromyalgia
Division of Pediatric and Public Health, Adams School of Dentistry, Department of Dental Ecology, Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, United States.
Department of Neural and Pain Sciences, Brotman Facial Pain Clinic, Center to Advance Chronic Pain Research, School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD, United States.
Department of Community Dentistry and Behavioral Science, Pain Research and Intervention Center of Excellence, College of Dentistry University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, United States.
Department of Anesthesiology, Center for Translational Pain Medicine, Duke University, Durham, NC, United States.
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2020 (English)In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 34, no Suppl, p. 15-28Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To assess cohort retention in the OPPERA project and to compare the degree of overlap between pairs of chronic overlapping pain conditions (COPCs) using a cross-sectional analysis of data from 655 adults who completed followup in the OPPERA study. Methods: Subjects were classified for the absence or presence of each of the five COPCs. The extent of overlap beyond chance was quantified using odds ratios, which were calculated using binary logistic regression models. Results: While overlap was the norm, its magnitude varied according to COPC: 51% of people with headache had one or more overlapping COPCs, and this proportion increased to 90% for people with fibromyalgia. The degree of overlap between pairs of COPCs also varied considerably, with odds ratios being greatest for associations between musculoskeletal conditions (fibromyalgia,temporomandibular disorders, and low back pain) and less pronounced for overlap invoMng headache or IBS. Furthermore, univariate associations between some pairs of COPCs were nullified after adjusting for other COPCs. Conclusion: There was greater overlap between fibromyalgia and either temporomandibular disorders or low back pain than between other pairs of COPCs. While musculoskeletal conditions exhibited some features that could be explained by a single functional syndrome, headache and irritable bowel syndrome did not.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence , 2020. Vol. 34, no Suppl, p. 15-28
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Dentistry
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URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-41120DOI: 10.11607/ofph.2581ISI: 000612434900006PubMedID: 32975538Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85091626756OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-41120DiVA, id: diva2:1535517
Available from: 2021-03-09 Created: 2021-03-09 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved

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Sharma, Sonia

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