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Games are Political: Challenging Municipal Urban Planning Practices For Sustainable Development and Mutual Learning Through Game Co-designing
Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design, Denmark.
Malmö University, Faculty of Culture and Society (KS), School of Arts and Communication (K3).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7776-3431
Roskilde University, Denmark.
2020 (English)In: Routledge Companion to Games in Architecture and Urban Planning: Tools for design, teaching, and research / [ed] Brkovic Dodig, Marta;Groat, Linda, London: Routledge, 2020, p. 32-46Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter draws on experiences and lessons learned from a process of hands-on, reflective game co-designing. The case is from the Urban Transition Öresund project (2013-14) which involved co-design and urban researchers, professional game designers, and civil servants working with complex, cross-sector sustainable urban planning in threemunicipalities in Scandinavia. The process included framing, co-designing, testing and playing what came to be called the “Urban Transition” game – explored in various real-world urban planning processes. By dissecting four co-design and play testing situations of this serious, dialogue game, the chapter aims to elucidate the inherent abilities of games as formats for collaboration, negotiation and mutual learning. The main claim is that games are practically “political” – in the sense that they can re-open taken-for-granted urban planning themes by emphasizing details and holistic views; can reveal assumptions about others by actualizing conflicts and can challenge current and possible future municipal, situated socio-material collaborative practices. Therefore, in urban planning processes[F1]  aimed at sustainable development, games and game co-designing should not be seen as de-politicized quick fixes but rather as highly “political” platforms for negotiation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
London: Routledge, 2020. p. 32-46
Keywords [en]
Game co-designing, mutual learning, sustainable urban transition, urban complexity, collaborative planning, cross-sector collaboration.
National Category
Other Humanities not elsewhere specified
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18148DOI: 10.4324/9780429441325-3Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85104706962ISBN: 9780429805707 (print)ISBN: 9780429441325 (electronic)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-18148DiVA, id: diva2:1462378
Projects
Urban Transition Oresund
Funder
EU, European Research CouncilAvailable from: 2020-08-29 Created: 2020-08-29 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved

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Eriksen, Mette AggerHellström Reimer, Maria

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