Malmö University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Through the quality kaleidoscope: reflections on research in dentomaxillofacial imaging
Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
Division of Dentistry, School of Medical Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.
Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD).
Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
2020 (English)In: Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology, ISSN 0250-832X, E-ISSN 1476-542X, Vol. 49, no 6, article id 20190484Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The REduce research Waste And Reward Diligence statement has highlighted how weaknesses in health research can produce misleading results and waste valuable resources. Research on diagnostic efficacy in the field of dentomaxillofacial radiology (DMFR) is no exception to these criticisms and could be strengthened by more robust study designs, consistent use of a core set of outcome measures and completeness in reporting. Furthermore, we advocate that everyone participating in collaborative research on clinical interventions subscribes to the importance of methodological quality in how imaging methods are used. The aim of this paper, therefore, is to present a guide to conducting high-quality research on diagnostic efficacy in DMFR.We initially propose a framework inspired by the hierarchical model of efficacy of Fryback and Thornbury, highlighting study designs, measures of analysis, completeness of reporting and established guidelines to assist in these aspects of research. Bias in research, and measures to prevent or limit it, are then described.It is desirable to climb the Fryback and Thornbury "ladder" from technical efficacy, via accuracy and clinical efficacy, to societal efficacy of imaging methods. Efficacy studies on the higher steps of the ladder may be difficult to perform, but we must strive to answer questions of how useful our methods are in patient management and assess benefits, risks, costs, ethical and social issues. With the framework of six efficacy levels as the structure and based on our experience, we present information that may facilitate quality enhancement of diagnostic efficacy research in DMFR.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
British Institute of Radiology , 2020. Vol. 49, no 6, article id 20190484
Keywords [en]
bias, guidelines, imaging efficacy, reporting, research design
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14253DOI: 10.1259/dmfr.20190484ISI: 000561976300007PubMedID: 31971827Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-85086245745OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-14253DiVA, id: diva2:1417798
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-06-17Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedScopus

Authority records

Rohlin, MadeleineLindh, Christina

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Rohlin, MadeleineLindh, Christina
By organisation
Faculty of Odontology (OD)
In the same journal
Dento-Maxillo-Facial Radiology
Dentistry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 56 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf