Malmö University Publications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Personalising Applications to Influence Health-Related Behaviour: An Exploration of Differences in Motivation
Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-2784-2238
Senior Software Development Engineer, Amazon, Vancouver, Canada .
Malmö högskola, Faculty of Technology and Society (TS), Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT).ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4261-281X
2017 (English)In: 22nd UK Academy for Information Systems International Conference: Ubiquitous Information Systems: Surviving & thriving in a connected society, UK Academy for Information Systems , 2017, article id 31Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

To support health-related behaviour changes, consumers may use technologies such as smartphones, smartbands, sensors and other devices connected to the Internet of Things. Research has shown that personalising the interaction, including the interface, data, and feedback, can result in more effective outcomes in terms of the desired changes in behaviour. This paper reports on a pilot study that tested a smartphone step challenge application that was personalised based on the user’s motivational style using the Behavioural Inhibition System/Behavioural Approach System (BIS/BAS) scales of Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory. The results indicated that participation in the step challenge did change the behaviour of the participants. For half the days of the challenge, the application delivered pep talks tailored to the two motivational styles and to the participant’s behaviour (taking more or fewer steps than on the previous day). While the study found that participants with different motivational styles responded differently to the motivational cues (pep talks), their responses did not appear to be influenced by the personalisation of the pep talks.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
UK Academy for Information Systems , 2017. article id 31
Keywords [en]
Motivation, Personalization, Behavior, Internet of Things, Health
National Category
Engineering and Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-12445Local ID: 24174OAI: oai:DiVA.org:mau-12445DiVA, id: diva2:1409492
Conference
UK Academy for Information Systems (UKAIS) 22nd Annual Conference, Oxford, UK (3rd-5th April 2017)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2024-05-13Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(374 kB)223 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 374 kBChecksum SHA-512
964155518839dbfafaa7a0f5ad7483efc74e8f7aca8727c49416f266b96c3e0795803aa4efe2a64515e14d1ad19f0b3849ff68a4ec73a27c5f8b7a5f79b6a98d
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Fulltext

Authority records

Russo, Nancy LOlsson, Carl Magnus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Russo, Nancy LOlsson, Carl Magnus
By organisation
Department of Computer Science and Media Technology (DVMT)
Engineering and Technology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 223 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 107 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf