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Nyberg, Daniel
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Wright, C. & Nyberg, D. (2021). How Organizations Translate Climate Change into Business as Usual. In: Jan W. Dash (Ed.), World Scientific Encyclopedia of Climate Change: Case Studies of Climate Risk, Action, and Opportunity. Volume 1 (pp. 179-185). World Scientific
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How Organizations Translate Climate Change into Business as Usual
2021 (English)In: World Scientific Encyclopedia of Climate Change: Case Studies of Climate Risk, Action, and Opportunity. Volume 1 / [ed] Jan W. Dash, World Scientific, 2021, p. 179-185Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Policy responses to the growing climate crisis are based on the belief that markets and corporate innovation will be sufficient to provide solutions in rapidly decarbonizing the global economy. This view has been evident in proposals for “carbon pricing” (Stern, 2007), as well as among leading executives. For instance, business tycoon Richard Branson has proclaimed that, “our only option to stop climate change is for industry to make money from it” (Neubacher, 2012). So while businesses continue to be key contributors to escalating greenhouse gas emissions (Heede, 2014), they are also increasingly presented as offering innovative ways to reduce carbon emissions through technological innovations and improved eco-efficiency. But how much faith can we place in business to save us from climate change?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
World Scientific, 2021
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56820 (URN)10.1142/9789811213946_0023 (DOI)978-981-120-929-1 (ISBN)978-981-121-393-9 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-20 Created: 2022-12-20 Last updated: 2022-12-20Bibliographically approved
Wright, C. & Nyberg, D. (2019). Climate change and social innovation. In: Gerard George, Ted Baker, Paul Tracey, Havovi Joshi (Ed.), Climate change and social innovation: (pp. 47-60). Edward Elgar Publishing
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and social innovation
2019 (English)In: Climate change and social innovation / [ed] Gerard George, Ted Baker, Paul Tracey, Havovi Joshi, Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019, p. 47-60Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Climate change has rapidly emerged as a grand challenge confronting humanity. While fossil fuels have over the last two centuries underpinned the rapid economic development of our global economy, this has also resulted in a fundamental disruption to our planet’s carbon cycle and now threatens the habitable climate upon which human civilization has relied. The consequences of the climate crisis are only now revealing themselves in terms of extreme weather events of growing ferocity and step-changes in basic ecological processes. In this chapter the authors outline how political and economic responses to the climate crisis can be understood as forms of social innovation. In contrast to the narrow contemporary understanding of social innovation as reliant upon market mechanisms and corporate self-regulation, they argue that social innovation must return to older conceptions of the central role for civil society and communities in defining solutions based on improved social justice, equality and human rights. The authors outline three key political-economic models of social innovation in response to climate change: business as usual, green economy and climate mobilization. They identify the ways in which each of these models propose different understandings of social innovation in responding to the climate crisis in terms of their underlying ideological narrative and the proposed roles of business, government and civil society. The chapter concludes by identifying areas for future research in terms of more critical understandings of social innovation, the role of social movements and bridging the discursive duality of humanity and nature.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Edward Elgar Publishing, 2019
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64564 (URN)10.4337/9781786436016.00011 (DOI)2-s2.0-85104324013 (Scopus ID)9781786436009 (ISBN)9781786436016 (ISBN)
Available from: 2023-12-18 Created: 2023-12-18 Last updated: 2023-12-18Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, D., Wright, C. & Kirk, J. (2018). Dash for gas: Climate change, hegemony and the scalar politics of fracking in the UK (ed.). British Journal of Management, 29(2), 235-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dash for gas: Climate change, hegemony and the scalar politics of fracking in the UK
2018 (English)In: British Journal of Management, ISSN 1045-3172, E-ISSN 1467-8551, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 235-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper investigates the political contestation over hydraulic fracturing of shale gas, or ‘fracking’, in the UK. Based on an analysis of four public inquiries, it shows how both proponents and opponents of fracking employed scaling to mobilize interests by connecting (or disconnecting) fracking to spatial and temporal scales. The analysis explains how a fossil fuel hegemony was reproduced by linking local and specific benefits to nationally or globally recognized interests such as employment, energy security and emission reductions. The paper contributes to recent debates on environmental political contestation by showing how scaling enables the linkage of competing interests by alternating between spatial (e.g. local vs. global) and temporal (e.g. short term vs. long term) horizons. The authors argue that scaling allows dominant actors to uphold contradictory positions on climate change, which contributes to explaining the current disastrous political climate impasse.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2018
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-1921 (URN)10.1111/1467-8551.12291 (DOI)000430101800003 ()26915 (Local ID)26915 (Archive number)26915 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2023-01-27Bibliographically approved
Wright, C., Nyberg, D., Rickards, L. & Freund, J. (2018). Organizing in the Anthropocene (ed.). Organization, 25(4), 455-471
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Organizing in the Anthropocene
2018 (English)In: Organization, ISSN 1350-5084, E-ISSN 1461-7323, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 455-471Article, review/survey (Other academic) Published
Abstract [en]

The functioning of the biosphere and the Earth as a whole is being radically disrupted due to human activities, evident in climate change, toxic pollution and mass species extinction. Financialization and exponential growth in production, consumption and population now threaten our planet’s life-support systems. These profound changes have led Earth System scientists to argue we have now entered a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene. In this introductory article to the Special Issue, we first set out the origins of the Anthropocene and some of the key debates around this concept within the physical and social sciences. We then explore five key organizing narratives that inform current economic, technological, political and cultural understandings of the Anthropocene and link these to the contributions in this Special Issue. We argue that the Anthropocene is the crucial issue for organizational scholars to engage with in order to not only understand on-going anthropogenic problems but also help create alternative forms of organizing based on realistic Earth–human relations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2018
Keywords
Anthropocene, capitalism, Earth systems, narratives, organizing
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-886 (URN)10.1177/1350508418779649 (DOI)26916 (Local ID)26916 (Archive number)26916 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2020-06-02Bibliographically approved
Wright, C. & Nyberg, D. (2017). An inconvenient truth: How organizations translate climate change into business as usual (ed.). Academy of Management Journal, 60(5), 1633-1661
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An inconvenient truth: How organizations translate climate change into business as usual
2017 (English)In: Academy of Management Journal, ISSN 0001-4273, E-ISSN 1948-0989, Vol. 60, no 5, p. 1633-1661Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change represents the grandest of challenges facing humanity. In the space of two centuries of industrial development, human civilization has changed the chemistry of the atmosphere and oceans, with devastating consequences. Business organizations are central to this challenge, in that they support the production of escalating greenhouse gas emissions but also offer innovative ways to decarbonize our economies. In this paper, we examine how businesses respond to climate change. Based on five in-depth case studies of major Australian corporations over a 10-year period (2005–2015), we identify three key stages in the corporate translation of climate change: framing, localizing, and normalizing. We develop a grounded model that explains how the revolutionary import of grand challenges is converted into the mundane and comfortable concerns of “business as usual.” We find that critique is the major driver of this process by continuously revealing the tensions between the demands of the grand challenge and business imperatives. Our paper contributes to the literature on business and the natural environment by identifying how and why corporate environmental initiatives deteriorate over time. More specifically, we highlight the policy limitations of a reliance on business and market responses to the climate crisis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academy of Management, 2017
Keywords
Climate change, Corporations, Critique, Translation, Grand challenge
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-1876 (URN)10.5465/amj.2015.0718 (DOI)000413231000001 ()24045 (Local ID)24045 (Archive number)24045 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2023-01-27Bibliographically approved
Gond, J.-P. & Nyberg, D. (2017). Materializing power to recover corporate social responsibility (ed.). Organization Studies, 38(8), 1127-1148
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Materializing power to recover corporate social responsibility
2017 (English)In: Organization Studies, ISSN 0170-8406, E-ISSN 1741-3044, Vol. 38, no 8, p. 1127-1148Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Through the development of CSR ratings, metrics and management tools, corporate social responsibility is currently materialized at an unprecedented scale within and across organizations. However, the material dimension of CSR and the inherent political potential in this materialization have been neglected. Drawing on insights from actor-network theory and the critical discussion of current approaches to power in CSR studies, we offer an alternative sociomaterial conceptualization of power in order to clarify how power works through materialized forms of CSR. We develop a framework that explains both how power is constituted within materialized forms of CSR through processes of ‘assembling/disassembling’, and how power is mobilized through materialized forms of CSR through processes of ‘overflowing/framing’. From this framework, we derive four tactics that clarify how CSR materializations can be seized by marginalized actors to ‘recover’ CSR. Our analysis aims to renew CSR studies by showing the potential of CSR for progressive politics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2017
Keywords
actor-network theory, corporate social responsibility, power, theory-building, sociomateriality
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-1905 (URN)10.1177/0170840616677630 (DOI)000406595600006 ()24039 (Local ID)24039 (Archive number)24039 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2023-01-27Bibliographically approved
Nyberg, D., Wright, C. & Kirk, J. (2017). Re-producing a neoliberal political regime: Competing justifications and dominance in disputing fracking. In: Charlotte Cloutier, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca (Ed.), Charlotte Cloutier, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca (Ed.), Justification, Evaluation and Critique in the Study of Organizations: Contributions from French Pragmatist Sociology (pp. 143-171). Emerald Group Publishing Limited
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Re-producing a neoliberal political regime: Competing justifications and dominance in disputing fracking
2017 (English)In: Justification, Evaluation and Critique in the Study of Organizations: Contributions from French Pragmatist Sociology / [ed] Charlotte Cloutier, Jean-Pascal Gond, Bernard Leca, Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017, p. 143-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

While the use of the pragmatic sociology of critique has enjoyed increasing academic popularity, the relationship between justification and broader power relations remains unclear. Recent attention to the concept of ‘domination’ suggests the need for a greater focus on how employed public goods reinforce prevailing social arrangements. In this article we explore the public debate over the expansion of hydraulic fracturing of shale gas (so-called ‘fracking’) in the United Kingdom (UK). This technology has generated significant debate and controversy. Through a detailed examination of public inquiries into the technology we explore how different actors employ discursive strategies to justify their claims for the expansion or rejection of fracking. Through this analysis, the article identifies how some of these justifications enjoy precedence over others within the prevailing neoliberal political regime. By explaining how such a political regime is constituted, our study contributes to better understanding how different justifications support hegemonic political ideologies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Emerald Group Publishing Limited, 2017
Series
Research in the Sociology of Organizations, ISSN 0733-558X ; 52
Keywords
Fracking, Domination, Justification, Political regime, Boltanski, Neoliberalism
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-9076 (URN)10.1108/S0733-558X20170000052005 (DOI)2-s2.0-85020293074 (Scopus ID)24041 (Local ID)978-1-78714-380-7 (ISBN)978-1-78714-379-1 (ISBN)24041 (Archive number)24041 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-22Bibliographically approved
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