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Publications (10 of 43) Show all publications
Nilsson, E.-L., Vasiljevic, Z. & Svensson, R. (2024). The association between number of siblings and delinquent behaviour. Journal of Crime and Justice
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The association between number of siblings and delinquent behaviour
2024 (English)In: Journal of Crime and Justice, ISSN 0735-648XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines the association between number of siblings and delinquency, adjusting for family relations and demographic variables. Data is based on a nationally representative school survey in Sweden consisting of approximately 25,000 youths. The results show a positive association for those having five or more siblings (IRR = 1.533, p = < .001), whereas one or two siblings is negatively associated with delinquency compared to those having no siblings. These results remain stable after adjusting for family relations. This study underscores the importance of further exploring the variation and direction of the association between the number of siblings and delinquency, as well as deepening our understanding of the various theoretical mechanisms through which the number of siblings is associated with delinquent behaviour.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
Keywords
Delinquency, family size, number of siblings, nonlinear associations
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66869 (URN)10.1080/0735648X.2024.2333262 (DOI)001189769100001 ()2-s2.0-85189333721 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-04-23 Created: 2024-04-23 Last updated: 2024-04-23Bibliographically approved
Kapetanovic, S., Andersson, L., Svensson, R. & Johnson, B. (2024). Validation of the Super-Brief Pathological Narcissism Inventory (SB-PNI) among Swedish adolescents. Current Psychology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Validation of the Super-Brief Pathological Narcissism Inventory (SB-PNI) among Swedish adolescents
2024 (English)In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

This study examines the psychometric structure and properties of the Swedish version of the Super-Brief Pathological Narcissism Inventory (SB-PNI) among adolescents. In order to ensure the validity and feasibility of the measure, we examined the factor structure, measurement invariance across gender, age and ethnicity, and construct validity in relation to a number of correlates of narcissism in adolescence. Data were drawn from a large cross-sectional survey conducted in 35 schools in southern Sweden. The sample consisted of N = 5313 adolescents (Mage = 16.10 SD = 1.55) with 52.2% girls, 45.9% boys and 1.8% adolescents with unspecified gender, from compulsory and upper secondary schools in southern Sweden. The results showed that the measure holds a two-factor structure, suggesting the use of the subscales grandiosity and vulnerability separately, rather than as a unidimensional measure. The correlated factors grandiosity and vulnerability yielded full configural and metric invariance across gender, age, and ethnicity. Both grandiosity and vulnerability were correlated with externalizing and internalizing symptoms, as well as with low self-esteem. The study provides evidence for the utility of the SB-PNI among Swedish adolescents and indicates that the measure can be used across male and female adolescents of different ages and ethnic groups. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2024
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66402 (URN)10.1007/s12144-024-05749-4 (DOI)001170492500003 ()2-s2.0-85186199898 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-20 Created: 2024-03-20 Last updated: 2024-03-28Bibliographically approved
Vasiljevic, Z., Pauwels, L., Nilsson, E.-L., Shannon, D. & Svensson, R. (2023). Do Moral Values Moderate the Relationship Between Immigrant-School Concentration and Violent Offending?: A Cross-Level Interaction Analysis of Self-Reported Violence in Sweden. Deviant behavior
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Do Moral Values Moderate the Relationship Between Immigrant-School Concentration and Violent Offending?: A Cross-Level Interaction Analysis of Self-Reported Violence in Sweden
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2023 (English)In: Deviant behavior, ISSN 0163-9625, E-ISSN 1521-0456Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

The study examines whether school-level immigrant concentration is related to students' involvement in violence, and whether students' moral values moderate the relationship between immigrant concentration and violence. The study is based on six nationally representative school surveys conducted by the Swedish National Council for Crime Prevention between 1999 and 2011, with a combined sample of 38,711 adolescents. We have combined different surveys to create one large pooled data set to evaluate segregation effects at the school level. Multilevel linear probability models are used to examine cross-level interaction effects. This study shows that contextual effects impact students differently, and that the relationship between immigrant concentration and violence is considerably stronger for adolescents with weak personal moral values. The paper provides empirical support for the differential vulnerability hypothesis. Policy and practice would benefit from a focus on the further development of programs and interventions that target personal moral values, not least in schools.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
Keywords
violent offending, school level, immigrant concentration, moral values, cross-level interaction
National Category
Law and Society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63504 (URN)10.1080/01639625.2023.2266550 (DOI)001080064200001 ()2-s2.0-85173727059 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-07 Created: 2023-11-07 Last updated: 2023-11-07Bibliographically approved
Svensson, R., Moeller, K., Johnson, B. & Shannon, D. (2023). For Whom Do Unstructured Activities Matters? The Interaction Between Unstructured and Structured Activities in Delinquency and Cannabis Use: A National Self-Report Study. Crime and delinquency, 69(10), 2022-2045, Article ID 001112872211104.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>For Whom Do Unstructured Activities Matters? The Interaction Between Unstructured and Structured Activities in Delinquency and Cannabis Use: A National Self-Report Study
2023 (English)In: Crime and delinquency, ISSN 0011-1287, E-ISSN 1552-387X, Vol. 69, no 10, p. 2022-2045, article id 001112872211104Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines whether unstructured and structured activities interact in their association with delinquency and cannabis use. We hypothesize that unstructured activities are more strongly associated with delinquency and cannabis use for those who are less engaged in structured activities. Data are drawn from three nationally representative self-report studies conducted between 2005 and 2011 in Sweden, and include 19,644 adolescents. The results support the hypothesis that unstructured activities interact with structured activities in the association with delinquency and cannabis use. The association between unstructured activities and these outcomes is stronger for those with lower levels of structured activities. Sporting activities constitute the structured activity that most clearly interacts with unstructured activities in the association with delinquency and cannabis use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
unstructured activities, structured activities, sports, delinquency, cannabis use
National Category
Substance Abuse
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-54058 (URN)10.1177/00111287221110448 (DOI)000828849400001 ()2-s2.0-85135007298 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-02 Created: 2022-08-02 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Svensson, R., Johnson, B. & Olsson, A. (2022). Does gender matter? The association between different digital media activities and adolescent well-being. BMC Public Health, 22, 1-10, Article ID 273.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does gender matter? The association between different digital media activities and adolescent well-being
2022 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, p. 1-10, article id 273Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background:

Previous research on the relationship between social media use and well-being in adolescents has yielded inconsistent results. We addressed this issue by examining the association between various digital media activities, including a new and differentiated measure of social media use, and well-being (internalizing symptoms) in adolescent boys and girls.

Method:

The sample was drawn from the four cross-sectional surveys from the Öckerö project (2016–2019) in eight municipalities in southern Sweden, consisting of 3957 adolescents in year 7 of compulsory education, aged 12–13. We measured the following digital media activities: playing games and three different activities of social media use (chatting, online sociability, and self-presentation). Our outcome measure was internalizing symptoms. Hypotheses were tested with linear regression analysis.

Results:

Social media use and playing games were positively associated with internalizing symptoms. The effect of social media use was conditional on gender, indicating that social media use was only associated with internalizing symptoms for girls. Of the social media activities, only chatting and self-presentation (posting information about themselves) were positively associated with internalizing symptoms. Self-presentation was associated with internalizing symptoms only for girls.

Conclusion:

Our study shows the importance of research going beyond studying the time spent on social media to examine how different kinds of social media activities are associated with well-being. Consistent with research in psychology, our results suggest that young girls posting information about themselves (i.e. self-presentation) might be especially vulnerable to display internalizing symptoms.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2022
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50252 (URN)10.1186/s12889-022-12670-7 (DOI)000753873200008 ()35144587 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124500768 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Malmö University
Available from: 2022-02-16 Created: 2022-02-16 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, R. & Johnson, B. (2022). Does it matter in what family constellations adolescents live? Reconsidering the relationship between family structure and delinquent behaviour.. PLOS ONE, 17(4), Article ID e0265964.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does it matter in what family constellations adolescents live? Reconsidering the relationship between family structure and delinquent behaviour.
2022 (English)In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 17, no 4, article id e0265964Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: This study examines the associations between ten family structure types and delinquency, including four groups of symmetrical and asymmetrical living arrangements. We also adjust for attachment to parents and parental monitoring.

METHODS: Data are drawn from four cross-sectional surveys conducted between 2016 and 2019 in southern Sweden. The sample consists of 3,838 adolescents, aged 14-15. Negative binomial models were used to calculate the associations between family structure and delinquency.

RESULTS: The results show that those living in single-father, single-mother, father-stepmother, mother-stepfather families report significantly more delinquency than adolescents living with both their parents. Adolescents living in "symmetrical" family arrangements, i.e. both parents are single or have a new partner, reported lower levels of delinquency, whereas adolescents living in "asymmetrical" family arrangements, i.e. where either the mother or the father, but not both, have a new partner, reported higher levels of delinquency. Most of the associations between family structure and delinquency decline when adjusted for attachment to parents and parental monitoring.

DISCUSSION: This study shows that it is important to move on to the use of more detailed categorisations of family structure in relation to delinquency. We need to increase our knowledge about the group of adolescents that moves between parents and especially about the different constellations of asymmetrical and symmetrical living arrangements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
PLoS, 2022
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-51288 (URN)10.1371/journal.pone.0265964 (DOI)000791994200042 ()35417470 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85128331629 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-04 Created: 2022-05-04 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, R., Johnson, B. & Kronkvist, K. (2021). A community intervention to reduce alcohol consumption and drunkenness among adolescents in Sweden: a quasi-experiment. BMC Public Health, 21(1), Article ID 764.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A community intervention to reduce alcohol consumption and drunkenness among adolescents in Sweden: a quasi-experiment
2021 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 764Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Several studies have examined the effect of community interventions on youth alcohol consumption, and the results have often been mixed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of a community intervention known as the Öckerö Method on adolescent alcohol consumption and perceived parental attitudes towards adolescent drinking.

METHOD: The study is based on a quasi-experimental design, using matched controls. Self-report studies were conducted among adolescents in grades 7-9 of compulsory education in four control and four intervention communities in the south of Sweden in 2016-2018. Baseline measures were collected in autumn 2016 before the intervention was implemented in the intervention communities. Outcomes were the adolescents' alcohol consumption, past-year drunkenness, past-month drunkenness and perceived parental attitudes towards alcohol.

RESULTS: Estimating Difference-in-Difference models using Linear Probability Models, we found no empirical evidence that the intervention has any effect on adolescents' drinking habits, or on their perceptions of their parents' attitudes towards adolescent drinking.

CONCLUSION: This is the first evaluation of this method, and we found no evidence that the intervention had any effect on the level of either young people's alcohol consumption or their past-year or past-month drunkenness, nor on their parents' perceived attitudes toward adolescent drinking. A further improvement would be to employ a follow-up period that is longer than the three-year period employed in this study.

TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN registry: Study ID: 51635778 , 31th March 2021 (Retrospectively registered).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2021
Keywords
Adolescents, Alcohol use, Intervention, Prevention, The Öckerö method
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-42121 (URN)10.1186/s12889-021-10755-3 (DOI)000642621000002 ()33882888 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85104608981 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-07 Created: 2021-05-07 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Nivette, A. E., Zahnow, R., Aguilar, R., Ahven, A., Amram, S., Ariel, B., . . . Eisner, M. P. (2021). A global analysis of the impact of COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions on crime. Nature Human Behaviour, 5, 868-877
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A global analysis of the impact of COVID-19 stay-at-home restrictions on crime
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2021 (English)In: Nature Human Behaviour, E-ISSN 2397-3374, Vol. 5, p. 868-877Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The implementation of COVID-19 stay-at-home policies was associated with a considerable drop in urban crime in 27 cities across 23 countries. More stringent restrictions over movement in public space were predictive of larger declines in crime. The stay-at-home restrictions to control the spread of COVID-19 led to unparalleled sudden change in daily life, but it is unclear how they affected urban crime globally. We collected data on daily counts of crime in 27 cities across 23 countries in the Americas, Europe, the Middle East and Asia. We conducted interrupted time series analyses to assess the impact of stay-at-home restrictions on different types of crime in each city. Our findings show that the stay-at-home policies were associated with a considerable drop in urban crime, but with substantial variation across cities and types of crime. Meta-regression results showed that more stringent restrictions over movement in public space were predictive of larger declines in crime.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nature Publishing Group, 2021
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-43931 (URN)10.1038/s41562-021-01139-z (DOI)000657217600001 ()34079096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85107290636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-22 Created: 2021-06-22 Last updated: 2024-06-18Bibliographically approved
Johnson, B. & Svensson, R. (2021). Alcohol drinking among adolescents with native-Swedish and non-European immigrant background: the importance of parental attitudes and peer attitudes for acculturation. Drugs: education prevention and policy, 28(3), 255-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alcohol drinking among adolescents with native-Swedish and non-European immigrant background: the importance of parental attitudes and peer attitudes for acculturation
2021 (English)In: Drugs: education prevention and policy, ISSN 0968-7637, E-ISSN 1465-3370, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 255-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this study, we examine differences in alcohol drinking between first- and second-generation non-European immigrant and native-Swedish adolescents. We also examine whether parental and peer attitudes toward alcohol are associated with the acculturation of drinking habits among adolescents with an immigrant background. The study is cross-sectional and based on a school survey conducted in 2016–2019 in eight municipalities in southern Sweden. The sample consists of 3743 adolescents in year 9 of compulsory education, aged 14–15 years, of which 538 (14.4%) had a non-European immigrant background. Non-European immigrant adolescents reported significantly lower levels of drinking than native-Swedish adolescents. Second-generation immigrants reported a higher level of consumption than first-generation immigrants, and among first-generation adolescents, drinking was more prevalent the longer the adolescents had resided in Sweden, which suggests acculturation of drinking habits. This acculturation is mainly related to changes in peer attitudes toward alcohol. Immigrant adolescents with a longer stay in Sweden reported having friends with more positive attitudes toward alcohol. Among first-generation immigrants, drinking was more common among boys than girls. These differences were primarily found among immigrant adolescents with a relatively short period of residence in Sweden, which suggests that acculturation occurs more quickly among boys than among girls.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Alcohol, adolescents, non-European immigrants, acculturation, peer attitudes, parental attitudes
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology Law and Society
Research subject
Criminology; Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18263 (URN)10.1080/09687637.2020.1822293 (DOI)000569988500001 ()2-s2.0-85091049900 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Öckeröprojektet
Available from: 2020-09-17 Created: 2020-09-17 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Svensson, R. & Oberwittler, D. (2021). Changing routine activities and the decline of youth crime: A repeated cross-sectional analysis of self-reported delinquency in Sweden, 1999-2017. Criminology (Beverly Hills), 59(2), 351-386
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Changing routine activities and the decline of youth crime: A repeated cross-sectional analysis of self-reported delinquency in Sweden, 1999-2017
2021 (English)In: Criminology (Beverly Hills), ISSN 0011-1384, E-ISSN 1745-9125, Vol. 59, no 2, p. 351-386Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examines the declining crime trend among Swedish adolescents between 1999 and 2017 using data from eight repeated cross-sectional waves of a nationally representative school survey (N = ca. 49,000). We examined to what extent changes in parental monitoring, school bonds, attitudes toward crime, routine activities, and binge drinking were related to the noticeable decline in youth crime. Multilevel modeling was employed for the analysis of temporal trends. We found strong empirical support for our hypotheses, that is, that changes in social bonds, attitudes toward crime, and routine activities were all associated with the decline in youth crime. Routine activities had the strongest explanatory power, and all predictors combined accounted for most of the variance attributed to the decline in youth crime. This study moves research on the crime drop closer to the analysis of social mechanisms by demonstrating that micro-level associations between theoretically relevant, proximal variables, and delinquency account for macro-level change.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
adolescents, attitudes toward crime, crime drop, routine activities, self-reported delinquency, social bonds
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Criminology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-43944 (URN)10.1111/1745-9125.12273 (DOI)000656233200001 ()
Available from: 2021-06-22 Created: 2021-06-22 Last updated: 2022-11-07Bibliographically approved
Projects
The Öckerö Method: An Experimental Evaluation; Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Social Work (SA); Publications
Svensson, R., Johnson, B. & Olsson, A. (2022). Does gender matter? The association between different digital media activities and adolescent well-being. BMC Public Health, 22, 1-10, Article ID 273.
Repeat victimization in Malmö City; Malmö University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6080-2780

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