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Amhag, L. (2020). Student reflections and self-assessments in vocational training supported by a mobile learning hub (ed.). International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, 12(1), 1-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student reflections and self-assessments in vocational training supported by a mobile learning hub
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, ISSN 1941-8647, E-ISSN 1941-8655, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to contribute knowledge about what characterizes students’ capabilities to reflect on and self-assess their professional development during four school based vocational training courses in distance higher education. What abilities and challenges appear in their written reflections and self-assessments with critical incidents about a situation, incident, or issue in their log journals, as well as in their discussions online. face-to-face (F2F), supported by a mobile learning hub (MLH) with both mobile and blended activities? Theoretically, the study is based on five major levels of reflection: reporting, responding, relating, reasoning and reconstructing. The results from a group of students’ representative excerpts demonstrates the importance of letting student teachers have agency and mediate their subjective experiences during practical vocational training in progression, supported by mobile and blended tools, to understand and make sense of experience in relation to self, others, and contextual conditions for personal and professional learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Mobile, 2020
Keywords
Critical Incident, Distance Education, Evaluator Reflection, Mobile Artefact, Self-Assessment, Vocational Training
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3016 (URN)10.4018/IJMBL.2020010101 (DOI)000508351700002 ()2-s2.0-85073154895 (Scopus ID)30703 (Local ID)30703 (Archive number)30703 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L. (2020). Virtual and Mobile Learning Activities in Higher Education. USA: IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Virtual and Mobile Learning Activities in Higher Education
2020 (English)Book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

In my research and review of several peer reviewed articles in these book, show that higher education faces major challenges both pedagogically and technically (Amhag, 2011; 2012; 2013a; 2013b; 2016a; 2016b; 2017; 2020; Amhag, Hellstrom & Stigmar, 2019; Amhag & Jakobsson, 2009). In the articles provides several opportunities to design and teach for self-directed and motivated higher education with smart pedagogy in a resource-enriched virtual learning environment, VLE through technology-embedded blended prerequisite and activities across various dimensions, including the notion that students can learn self-directed at anywhere and anytime, and easily switch learning contexts to another or a variety of scenarios. These blended learning activities combines both in- and out-off the university and during practical training in the profession by using face-to-face, F2F classroom lessons, teacher-recorded flipped lesson videos and mobile online webinars F2F with chat communications that contribute to increase internationalization, globalization and digitization of higher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
USA: IGI Global, 2020. p. 200
Series
Arbetsliv: forskning och utvärdering
Series
Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design book series, ISSN 2326-8905, E-ISSN 2326-8913
Keywords
Distance Education, Distance Learning, Mobile Activities, Smart Education, Peer Learning, Peer Feedback, Reflection and Self-Assessment, Virtual Learning
National Category
Educational Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-17863 (URN)10.4018/978-1-7998-4183-8 (DOI)2-s2.0-85136683624 (Scopus ID)1799841839 (ISBN)9781799841838 (ISBN)9781799852872 (ISBN)9781799841845 (ISBN)
Projects
PedagogikDistansundervisning
Available from: 2020-07-28 Created: 2020-07-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L., Hellström, L. & Stigmar, M. (2019). Teacher Educators' Use of Digital Tools and Needs for Digital Competence in Higher Education (ed.). Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, 35(4), 203-220
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teacher Educators' Use of Digital Tools and Needs for Digital Competence in Higher Education
2019 (English)In: Journal of Digital Learning in Teacher Education, ISSN 2153-2974, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 203-220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Based on a study at two Swedish universities, this article aimed to identify teacher educators’ use of digital tools and subsequent need for digital competence in higher education. Methodically, a digital survey was distributed via e-mail to 405 teacher educators representing two faculties at the two universities; in total, 105 teacher educators responded. The survey included 16 questions, with closed- and open-ended varieties. Two theoreticalfoundations were used: the TPACK model and, as a complement, computer self-efficacy. Through analysis of self-reported use, competence, and need for professional training in digitalization in teaching, results show that teacher educators do not use digital tools primarily for pedagogical purposes. Thus, they need extensive pedagogical support in creating digital teaching. Further, teacher educators need to identify the pedagogical surplus value in their own teaching and learning context with digital tools to increase motivation for concrete, effective, and subject-oriented successful examples as presented by experienced teachers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
computer self-efficacy, digital competence, digital teaching, higher education, teacher educators, teacher training
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3866 (URN)10.1080/21532974.2019.1646169 (DOI)2-s2.0-85070993485 (Scopus ID)30605 (Local ID)30605 (Archive number)30605 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L., Hellström, L. & Stigmar, M. (2018). Teacher educators’ need continuing pedagogical support in digital teaching (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at Dialogkonferens 2018 Pedagogisk forskning Syd, Malmö, Sweden (29 Augusti 2018).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teacher educators’ need continuing pedagogical support in digital teaching
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study was to identify teacher educators' use of digital tools and needs of digital competence in higher education. The research questions were: a) How do teacher educators use digital tools and evaluate their competence to effectively practice ICT in teaching situations? b) What training do teacher educators need to make students functional online? The findings of the study are intended to help teacher educators to better meet the needs and challenges students encounter in their education and to influence and design online-based learning activities supported with different digital tools in higher education programs. Research shows that digital tools for pedagogical purposes is still poorly integrated in teacher education programs and there is a need for innovative solutions as an important part of teachers professional competence of using ICT for students learning (Tømte et al., 2015). Moreover, teacher educators have a fundamental role in training teachers for teaching and serve as role models for ICT-based teaching (Ungar & Baruch, 2016). According to Koehler et al. (2013) digital technologies, by contrast to traditional pedagogical technologies, are protean (i.e. usable in many different ways), unstable (rapidly changing) and opaque (the inner workings are hidden from users). The use of technology also needs to be developed professionally by tutoring and underlying educational pedagogy (Lakkala & Ilomäki, 2015) as well as to enhance understanding of the skills, dispositions, and knowledge for teaching-learning contexts where information and communication technologies are increasingly pivotal (Forbes & Khoo, 2015). The current study includes both quantitate and qualitative data from a digital survey with closed-ended questions, and open-ended questions from two faculties including teacher educaters at two different universities in Sweden. 105 respondents participated (26%). Two theoretical foundations are applied to analyse different aspects of the teachers’ use and need of ICT knowledge and competence: 1) The TPACK model and the interaction between the three knowledge domains: pedagogical knowledge, technical knowledge and content knowledge (Koehler, Mishra & Cain, 2013), and 2) three dimensions of Computer Self-Efficacy (CSE); magnitude, strength and generalizability (Compeau & Higgins, 1995). Results show that all teacher educators in our study use digital tools in planning and executing teaching. However, teacher educators do not use digital tools primarily for pedagogical purposes, and thus need extensive pedagogical support in creating digital teaching and learning environments, as well as to identify the pedagogical surplus value in their own teaching and learning context, in order to increase motivation for training of concrete, effective and subject-oriented successful examples presented by peers. The main conclusions that ought to be relevant and applicable for teacher educators worldwide are that; a) since the teacher educators do not use digital tools primarily for pedagogical purposes, extensive and continuing pedagogical support is needed in the field of creating digital teaching and learning environments; b) teacher educators need to identify the pedagogical surplus value in their own teaching and learning context with digital tools, in order to increase motivation for concrete, effective and subject-oriented successful examples presented by experienced teachers. References Compeau, D. R. & Higgins, C. A. (1995). Computer Self-Efficacy: Development of a Measure and Initial Test. MIS Quartely, Vol. 19, No. 2, pp. 189-211. Forbes, D. & Khoo, E. (2015). Voice over distance: a case of podcasting for learning in online teacher education. Distance Education, 36(3), 335-350. Koehler, M. J., Mishra, P. & Cain, W. (2013). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK)? Journal of Education, 13-19. Lakkala, M., & Ilomäki, L. (2015). A case study of developing ICT-supported pedagogy through a collegial practice transfer process. Computers & Education, 90, 1-12. Tømte, C., Enochsson, A. B., Buskqvist, U. & Kårstein, A. (2015). Educating online student teachers to master professional digital competence: The TPACK-framework goes online. Computers & Education, 84, 26-35. Ungar, O. A. & Baruch, A. F. (2016). Perceptions of teacher educators regarding ICT implementation. Interdisciplinary Journal of e-Skills and Life Long Learning, 12, 279-296.

National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-16548 (URN)26913 (Local ID)26913 (Archive number)26913 (OAI)
Conference
Dialogkonferens 2018 Pedagogisk forskning Syd, Malmö, Sweden (29 Augusti 2018)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2023-03-20Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L., Hellström, L. & Stigmar, M. (2018). Teacher educators’ use and needs of digital competence to support students’ online learning (ed.). In: (Ed.), : . Paper presented at IOSTE 2018, Malmö. Sweden (16 Aug. 2018). IOSTE 2018
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teacher educators’ use and needs of digital competence to support students’ online learning
2018 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The paper is based on a study at two universities in Sweden with the aim to identify and analyse teacher educators' expressed use and needs of digital competence in higher education. The research questions are: a) How do teacher educators use digital tools? b) How do teacher educators evaluate their competence to effectively use ICT? c) What training do teacher educators need to make students functional online? Methodically, a digital survey was distributed via e-mail to 405 teacher educators representing two faculties at the two different universities, 105 respondents answered (26%). The survey included 28 questions with both closed-ended questions (Likert six-point scale), as well as open-ended questions. Two theoretical foundations are applied to analyse different aspects of the teacher’s use and need of ICT knowledge and competence: 1) The TPACK model and the interaction between the three knowledge domains: Pedagogical knowledge (PK), Technical knowledge (TK) and Content knowledge (CK), and 2) three dimensions of Computer Self-Efficacy (CSE), magnitude, strength and generalizability. Results show that 92.3% of respondents use a laptop and 18.3% use interactive boards in their work. Further, respondents who report a low competence regarding digitalization of teaching (16.3%) report a significantly higher need of training (p<0.05) compared to respondents reporting a high competence (27.9%). Also, respondents who report a high competence regarding digitalization of teaching, report creating digital learning environments as something unproblematic to a significantly higher extent (p<0.001) compared to respondents reporting a low competence. 26.3% of the teacher educators (n=15) want trainings in content knowledge and 17.5% (n=10) in technical knowledge, as well as interactions between them. The findings show that all teacher educators use digital tools in planning and executing teaching. However, few teacher educators rate their ICT competence as high and want more training regrading subject didactic knowledge in the students teaching practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IOSTE 2018, 2018
Keywords
Computer Self-Efficacy, Digital competence, Digital teaching, Higher education, Teacher educators, Teacher training
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-16467 (URN)26858 (Local ID)26858 (Archive number)26858 (OAI)
Conference
IOSTE 2018, Malmö. Sweden (16 Aug. 2018)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2023-03-16Bibliographically approved
Isacsson, A., Amhag, L. & Stigmar, M. (2018). The content, challenges and values that form Nordic Vocational teacher education (ed.). Ammatitikasvatuksen aikakauskirja, 20(2)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The content, challenges and values that form Nordic Vocational teacher education
2018 (English)In: Ammatitikasvatuksen aikakauskirja, ISSN 1456-7989, Vol. 20, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article depicts four Nordic cases from the field of Vocational Teacher Education. The aim of the article is to compare statements, challenges and values that form vocational teacher programmes in the Nordic countries. Moreover, the aim of this article is to study common threads, contents, professional progress follow-up and learning examination practices in the Nordic vocational teacher programmes. In this article we describe one national example from each country. The examples come from Malmö University of Educational Sciences in Sweden, Metropolitan University College in Denmark, Olso Metropolitan University in Norway and Haaga-Helia School of Vocational Teacher Education in Finland. The article is a result of desk-analysis, interviews and collaborative writing. The findings indicate that the four countries and examples have a lot in common, but also differences e.g. related to strategies, values and practices. While an academic / scientific orientation have been chosen in Sweden, Norway and Denmark, competences form the basis for vocational teacher education in Finland. In conclusions we present an overview of the programmes and discuss the position of VET more generally in these countries and how it challenges vocational teacher education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OTTU, 2018
Keywords
Nordic VET teacher education, comparison, challenges, values
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14505 (URN)26804 (Local ID)26804 (Archive number)26804 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2022-03-11Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L. (2017). Mobile-Assisted Seamless Learning Activities in Higher Distance Education (ed.). International Journal of Higher Education, 6(3), 70-81
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile-Assisted Seamless Learning Activities in Higher Distance Education
2017 (English)In: International Journal of Higher Education, ISSN 1927-6044, E-ISSN 1927-6052, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 70-81Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Among online learning factors stated in the research literature, it is argued that online activities is the strongest factor which contributes to online learning. This article illuminates mobile-assisted seamless learning activities by using laptops, tablets, or smart phones. Two conditions are compared, a) face-to-face (F2F) online webinars (web-based seminars or conferencing), b) the elements of part a, but complemented by teacher-recorded flipped classroom-videos (pre-lectures) before the F2F online webinars. Data collection consists of observations of 22 recorded F2F online webinars among 40 vocational student teachers divided into groups of 18 and 22 participants, and 12 interviews (six from each group, including both women and men). The study is theoretically within the research concept of mobile-assisted seamless learning: mediated learning anytime, anywhere, and in different contexts. The results raise some challenges and implications presented by using mobile digital devices to expand participation and motivation across different contexts for creation of ubiquitous knowledge access.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sciedu, 2017
Keywords
Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, Distance Education, Flipped Classroom, Mobile assisted learning, Seamless learning activities
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3591 (URN)10.5430/ijhe.v6n3p70 (DOI)22604 (Local ID)22604 (Archive number)22604 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L. & Kupferberg, F. (2017). Pedagogik som profession (ed.) [Letter to the editor]. Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, 22(1-2), 3-8
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Pedagogik som profession
2017 (Swedish)In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, E-ISSN 2001-3345, Vol. 22, no 1-2, p. 3-8Article in journal, Letter (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

I ett tidigare nummer av Pedagogisk Forsknings i Sverige (vol 20, nr 3-4, 2005) om temat “Högre Utbildning och professionell verksamhet” pekar redaktörerna Sven Persson och Anders Olsson på en rad nya tendenser inom forskningen om professioner och professionalitet. Den viktigaste utmaningen är den personliga kunskapsaspekten. Även om det otvivelaktigt är så att professioner är makrosociologiska och därvid också kollektiva och strukturella fenomen – som existerar utanför och är oavhängiga den enskilde individen, både historiskt och nationellt – krävs en lång erfarenhet och oftast någon form av högre utbildning för att kunna inträda i rollen som professionell yrkesutövare.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Pedagogisk Forskning i Sverige, 2017
Keywords
Pedagogik, Profession, Erfarenhetsbaserad kunskap
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14502 (URN)23236 (Local ID)23236 (Archive number)23236 (OAI)
Note
Article, editorial letterAvailable from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L. (2017). Teaching and learning with Mobile-assisted Seamless Learning activities in Higher Distance Education (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Learning and education: material conditions and consequences. Paper presented at NERA 2017 Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark (23-25 March 2017) (pp. 390-391). : General Egyptian Book Organization, Article ID 596.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching and learning with Mobile-assisted Seamless Learning activities in Higher Distance Education
2017 (English)In: Learning and education: material conditions and consequences, General Egyptian Book Organization, 2017, p. 390-391, article id 596Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Research topic/Aim: Research on mobile teaching and learning in higher distance education is a growing area. This media development has also expanded spaces and opportunities for mobile teaching and learning, observation and documentation, and participation and creativeness. However, it is important with empirical evidence how this teaching and learning are enhancing students’ collaboration. The present study aimed to illustrate, compare, and analyse two conditions in higher distance education with mobile-assisted seamless learning (MSL) activities via laptops, tablets, and smartphones, and what significance these factors have for students learning in a more digitalised form of higher distance education. The following questions were addressed: • What is the importance of application of digital devices for students’ collaborative learning by using mobile F2F webinars with text-based chat and teacher-recorded flipped classroom videos? • What views do students’ in using MSL activities in higher distance education? Theoretical frameworks: Theoretically, the present study brings together the research tradition of CSCL and the concept of MSL. Both theories are based on the principle that it is not possible to understand learning only from individual actions. Methodically, two concepts are used. First, Wengers (1998) definition of sociocultural theory divided into four components: 1) meaning is learning as experiences, 2) practice is learning as doing, 3) community is learning as belonging, and 4) identity is learning as becoming. Second, the concept of MSL by Kuh (1996) and the six dimensions by Wong and Looi (2011) in their design of actual learning: 1) formal and informal learning, 2) personal and social learning, 3) learning across time, 4) learning across locations, 5) ubiquitous knowledge access, and 6) physical and digital spaces. A key component of this idea is that each student is using a personal device as a mediator. Methodology/research design: Two conditions are compared, a) face-to-face (F2F) online webinars (web-based seminars or conferencing) and textual real-time chat communications, b) the elements of part a, but complemented by teacher-recorded flipped classroom-videos (pre-lectures) before the F2F online webinars. Data collection consists of observations of 22-recorded F2F online webinars among 40 vocational student teachers divided into groups of 18 and 22 participants, and 12 interviews (six from each group, including both women and men) about their views of the MSL activities, as well as two course evaluations. Expected conclusions/Findings: The results raise some challenges and implications presented by using digital devices to embrace opportunities across different contexts for collaboration and for creation of ubiquitous knowledge access in the form of online webinars and flipped recordings. In terms of e-learning the mobile technology posed challenges when the e-meeting system had a problematic mobile connection, and teachers were unfamiliar with the online system and how to support the students. In terms of m-learning through portable digital devices F2F, shows the importance of promoting students’ collaborative learning anytime and anywhere and easily switch learning contexts to another. In terms of u-learning shows the prominence of ubiquitous mobile technology supporting students’ mediated meaning and learning within course documents, flipped recordings before the F2F webinars, and the recordings of the webinars were available. Relevance for Nordic Educational Research: With further research, these terms will have the potential to become a design-based research model for MSL in higher distance education.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
General Egyptian Book Organization, 2017
Keywords
Higher Distance Education, Mobile teaching, Computer supported collaborative learning, Online webinars, Mobile-assisted seamless learning
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-11546 (URN)23263 (Local ID)23263 (Archive number)23263 (OAI)
Conference
NERA 2017 Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark (23-25 March 2017)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Amhag, L. (2016). Mobile technologies for student centered learning in a distance higher education program. In: Janet Holland (Ed.), Janet Holland (Ed.), Wearable Technology and Mobile Innovations for Next-Generation Education: (pp. 184-199). IGI Global
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mobile technologies for student centered learning in a distance higher education program
2016 (English)In: Wearable Technology and Mobile Innovations for Next-Generation Education / [ed] Janet Holland, IGI Global, 2016, p. 184-199Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The aim of this study is to analyze mobile technologies for student centered learning in a distance higher education program with a focus on mobile online webinars (web-based seminars or conferencing) using mobile applications such as laptops, tablets or smart phones. As wearable technologies continue to grow it could very well extend to smart glasses, smart watches etc. These tools can provide teacher-recorded flipped classroom, face-to-face interactions and parallel chat communications. The data collection consists of observations of ten online face-to-face webinars with 22 students, six interviews, and two surveys. Theoretically, the study joins the research tradition of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning with emphasis on collaboration, and Computer Self-Efficacy concerned with individuals’ media and information literacy. Important conclusions from the study demonstrated mobile interactions increased student centered learning on theoretical concepts, assisted in the ability to review information critically, and provided experiences bridging of professional teaching practices.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
IGI Global, 2016
Series
Advances in Educational Technologies and Instructional Design (AETID), ISSN 2326-8905, E-ISSN 2326-8913
Keywords
Computer Self-efficacy, Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning, Distance Education, Distance Learning, Flipped Classroom, Mobile Applications, Online Webinar, Wearable Technology
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-10267 (URN)10.4018/978-1-5225-0069-8.ch010 (DOI)21185 (Local ID)9781522500698 (ISBN)9781522500704 (ISBN)21185 (Archive number)21185 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-06-11Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5263-3243

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