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Bertl, K., Kogelnik, S. L., Kukla, E., Herrmann, H., Schneider, S., Altorjai, G. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). A survey on oral health-related standard of care for head and neck cancer patients in the EU. Oral Diseases
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A survey on oral health-related standard of care for head and neck cancer patients in the EU
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2023 (English)In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: To map oral health-related standard of care in the context of head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment across the European Union (EU).

Materials and Methods: Six hundred and ninety centers across the European Union were contacted. The questionnaire contained questions focusing on the team/department structure, HNC treatment planning routines, and assessment and handling of dental treatment needs prior to cancer treatment.

Results: Eighty-seven centers across the EU responded. Department structure and number of HNC patients treated per year varied widely and dental professionals are included as part of the team in about 25% of the centers. Standard of care, in terms of dental assessment and preventive dentistry routines, such as recording an orthopantomogram, offering dental treatment, and providing a radiation protection splint and splint for fluoride application, differed significantly among the European regions. Independent of the region, these aspects are positively affected if dental professionals are part of the interdisciplinary treatment team and if dental treatment is offered within the center.

Conclusion: Dental professionals are still only to a very limited extent included in interdisciplinary treatment planning teams of HNC patients. However, their inclusion and/or offering dental treatment within the same hospital/center appears to improve oral health-related standard of care.

Clinical Relevance: Inclusion of dental professionals in treatment planning teams of HNC patients appears to improve oral health-related standard of care within HNC treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
head and neck cancer, oral health, preventive dentistry, questionnaire
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61883 (URN)10.1111/odi.14685 (DOI)001032396700001 ()37466114 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165389009 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2023-08-16Bibliographically approved
Edlund Johansson, P., Bertl, K., Pandis, N. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, 9(1), 3-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools: A systematic review and meta-analysis
2023 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To summarize the available evidence on the efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools (PDICTs) as an adjunct to tooth brushing compared to tooth brushing alone or tooth brushing combined with any other non-PDICT in terms of interproximal plaque and gingival bleeding reduction in gingivitis patients. Material and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in three databases until March 20, 2022 with the following main eligibility criteria: (1) randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with (2) at least 28 days of follow-up in (3) gingivitis patients. Interproximal plaque and bleeding values were defined as the primary outcome variables and used for pair-wise meta-analyses. Results: Sixteen RCTs were identified including data from 1258 participants at the final evaluation. Eight studies each investigated the effect of either a liquid-based or mechanical PDICT; one of these studies tested additionally a combined liquid-based and mechanical PDICT. Tooth brushing combined with a liquid-based PDICT compared to tooth brushing alone did not result in better interproximal plaque values but in significantly lower interproximal bleeding values. Tooth brushing combined with either a liquid-based PDICT or with a mechanical PDICT compared to tooth brushing and flossing achieved comparable interproximal plaque and bleeding values. The majority of studies reporting on patient compliance/preference favored the use of a PDICT, and except for a single study, which was reporting soft tissue trauma in two subjects from improper use of a mechanical PDICT, none of the studies reported adverse events. Conclusions: Daily use of PDICT as an adjunct to tooth brushing significantly reduces interproximal bleeding. This effect appears comparable to that of flossing, while PDICT may achieve higher patient acceptance/compliance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
bleeding, gingivitis, interdental cleaning device, meta-analysis, plaque, systematic review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58416 (URN)10.1002/cre2.691 (DOI)000903044600001 ()36562267 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145093023 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Jensen, S. S., Aghaloo, T., Jung, R. E., Bertl, K., Buser, D., Chappuis, V., . . . Zucchelli, G. (2023). Group 1 ITI Consensus Report: The role of bone dimensions and soft tissue augmentation procedures on the stability of clinical, radiographic, and patient-reported outcomes of implant treatment. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 34, 43-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Group 1 ITI Consensus Report: The role of bone dimensions and soft tissue augmentation procedures on the stability of clinical, radiographic, and patient-reported outcomes of implant treatment
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 34, p. 43-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: The aims of Working Group 1 were to address the role (i) of the buccolingual bone dimensions after implant placement in healed alveolar ridge sites on the occurrence of biologic and aesthetic complications, and (ii) of soft tissue augmentation (STA) on the stability of clinical, radiographic, and patient-related outcomes of implant treatments.Materials and Methods: Two systematic reviews were prepared in advance of the Consensus Conference and were discussed among the participants of Group 1. Consensus statements, clinical recommendations, recommendations for future research, and reflections on patient perspectives were based on structured group discussions until consensus was reached among the entire group of experts. The statements were then presented and accepted following further discussion and modifications as required by the plenary.Results: Dimensional changes of the alveolar ridge occurred after implant placement in healed sites, and a reduction in buccal bone wall thickness (BBW) of 0.3 to 1.8 mm was observed. In healed sites with a BBW of <1.5 mm after implant placement, increased vertical bone loss, and less favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes were demonstrated. Implants with buccal dehiscence defects undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration, showed less vertical bone loss, and more favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes, compared to non-augmented dehiscence defects during initial healing. At healthy single implant sites, probing depths, bleeding and plaque scores, and interproximal bone levels evaluated at 1 year, remained stable for up to 5 years, with or without STA. When single implant sites were augmented with connective tissue grafts, either for soft tissue phenotype modification or buccal soft tissue dehiscence, stable levels of the soft tissue margin, and stable or even increased soft tissue thickness and/or width of keratinized mucosa could be observed from 1 to 5 years. In contrast, non-augmented sites were more prone to show apical migration of the soft tissue margin in the long-term. Favorable aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes after STA were documented to be stable from 1 to 5 years.Results: Dimensional changes of the alveolar ridge occurred after implant placement in healed sites, and a reduction in buccal bone wall thickness (BBW) of 0.3 to 1.8 mm was observed. In healed sites with a BBW of <1.5 mm after implant placement, increased vertical bone loss, and less favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes were demonstrated. Implants with buccal dehiscence defects undergoing simultaneous guided bone regeneration, showed less vertical bone loss, and more favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes, compared to non-augmented dehiscence defects during initial healing. At healthy single implant sites, probing depths, bleeding and plaque scores, and interproximal bone levels evaluated at 1 year, remained stable for up to 5 years, with or without STA. When single implant sites were augmented with connective tissue grafts, either for soft tissue phenotype modification or buccal soft tissue dehiscence, stable levels of the soft tissue margin, and stable or even increased soft tissue thickness and/or width of keratinized mucosa could be observed from 1 to 5 years. In contrast, non-augmented sites were more prone to show apical migration of the soft tissue margin in the long-term. Favorable aesthetic and patient-reported outcomes after STA were documented to be stable from 1 to 5 years. Conclusions: It is concluded that dimensional changes of the alveolar ridge occur after implant placement in healed sites and that sites with a thin BBW after implant placement are prone to exhibit less favorable clinical and radiographic outcomes. In addition, it is concluded that STA can provide stable clinical, radiographic, aesthetic, and patient-reported outcomes in the medium and long-term.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
aesthetics, bone augmentation, dental implant, evidence-based dentistry, patient-reported outcome measures, soft tissue augmentation, surgical techniques, systematic review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64072 (URN)10.1111/clr.14154 (DOI)001098811000002 ()37750519 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85172813731 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-05 Created: 2023-12-05 Last updated: 2023-12-05Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Tsakos, G., Pandis, N., Bogren, A., Burisch, J. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Health-related quality of life aspects of the 'Periodontitis prevalence in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease' (PPCC) cohort. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 50(12), 1601-1620
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life aspects of the 'Periodontitis prevalence in ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease' (PPCC) cohort
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 1601-1620Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To assess whether oral health problems affect disease-specific quality of life (QoL) of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients, and vice versa, whether IBD affects oral-health-related QoL. Materials and Methods: Individuals reporting IBD and matched controls were surveyed on general anamnestic information, oral-health-related questions and the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP)-5. IBD patients were additionally surveyed on years since diagnosis, disease activity and severity as well as health-related QoL (Short Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire, sIBDQ). OHIP-5 and sIBDQ were defined as primary outcome parameters, and several predictors and confounders were used in adjusted univariable and multivariable regression analyses. Results: Answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls were analysed. Compared with controls, IBD patients reported significantly more frequently an oral impact on daily life and worse oral-health-related QoL, with Crohn's disease (CD) patients being more severely affected than ulcerative colitis (UC) patients. The diagnosis of UC and CD, having <20 teeth, severe periodontitis and stressful daily-life experience were associated with a higher prevalence of poor oral-health-related QoL. Among IBD patients, an impaired IBD-specific, health-related QoL was significantly associated with the diagnosis of CD and depression, IBD activity and severity, having <20 teeth, presence of oral lesions and stressful daily-life experience, while a longer time since diagnosis was significantly associated with an improved IBDspecific, health-related QoL. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicate, for the first time, that oral health problems are associated with an impairment of IBD-specific health-related QoL, and vice versa, IBD is associated with an impaired oral health-related QoL. This emphasizes the potential advantages of including dental professionals in the multi-disciplinary treatment teams of IBD patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
case-control study, inflammatory bowel disease, oral health problems, quality of life, questionnaire
National Category
Dentistry Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63067 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13863 (DOI)001062021400001 ()37670508 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85169784419 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-10-10 Created: 2023-10-10 Last updated: 2023-12-22Bibliographically approved
Domic, D., Bertl, K., Lang, T., Pandis, N., Ulm, C. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Hyaluronic acid in tooth extraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of preclinical and clinical trials. Clinical Oral Investigations, 27(12), 7209-7229
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Hyaluronic acid in tooth extraction: a systematic review and meta-analysis of preclinical and clinical trials
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 27, no 12, p. 7209-7229Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To assess whether in animals or patients with ≥ 1 tooth extracted, hyaluronic acid (HyA) application results in superior healing and/or improved complication management compared to any other treatment or no treatment.

Materials and methods: Three databases were searched until April 2022. The most relevant eligibility criteria were (1) local application of HyA as adjunct to tooth extraction or as treatment of alveolar osteitis, and (2) reporting of clinical, radiographic, histological, or patient-reported data. New bone formation and/or quality were considered main outcome parameters in preclinical studies, while pain, swelling, and trismus were defined as main outcome parameters in clinical studies.

Results: Five preclinical and 22 clinical studies (1062 patients at final evaluation) were included. In preclinical trials, HyA was applied into the extraction socket. Although a positive effect of HyA was seen in all individual studies on bone formation, this effect was not confirmed by meta-analysis. In clinical studies, HyA was applied into the extraction socket or used as spray or mouthwash. HyA application after non-surgical extraction of normally erupted teeth may have a positive effect on soft tissue healing. Based on meta-analyses, HyA application after surgical removal of lower third molars (LM3) resulted in significant reduction in pain perception 7 days postoperatively compared to either no additional wound manipulation or the application of a placebo/carrier. Early post-operative pain, trismus, and extent of swelling were unaffected.

Conclusions: HyA application may have a positive effect in pain reduction after LM3 removal, but not after extraction of normally erupted teeth.

Clinical relevance: HyA application may have a positive effect in pain reduction after surgical LM3 removal, but it does not seem to have any impact on other complications or after extraction of normally erupted teeth. Furthermore, it seems not to reduce post-extraction alveolar ridge modeling, even though preclinical studies show enhanced bone formation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Hyaluronic acid, Tooth extraction, Wound healing, Systematic review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64030 (URN)10.1007/s00784-023-05227-4 (DOI)001101076100001 ()37963982 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85176575312 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-04 Created: 2023-12-04 Last updated: 2024-01-04Bibliographically approved
Stavropoulos, A., Bertl, K., Isidor, F. & Vult von Steyern, P. (2023). Implantoplasty and the risk of fracture of narrow implants with advanced bone loss: A laboratory study. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 34(10), 1038-1046
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Implantoplasty and the risk of fracture of narrow implants with advanced bone loss: A laboratory study
2023 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 34, no 10, p. 1038-1046Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To assess the impact of implantoplasty (IP) on maximum implant failure strength of narrow diameter implants of different type/design and material, with simulated advanced bone loss.

Materials and Methods: Narrow, parallel-walled implants (3.3 mm in diameter x 10 mm long) with an internal connection of different type/design [bone level (BL), tissue level (TL)] and material [Titanium grade IV (Ti), Titanium-Zirconium alloy (TiZr)] from one specific manufacturer were used. Half of the implants were subjected to IP in their coronal 5 mm; the remaining were used as controls (seven implants per group). Dynamic loading prior to maximum load strength testing was included.

Results: During dynamic loading, the fracture rate of BL implants was low and independent of IP, while that of TL implants increased significantly with IP compared with controls (p = .001). Maximum implant failure strength reduction (in %) due to IP, was 1.3%-25.4%; TiZr BL implants were least affected. Implants subjected to IP compared to those without IP as well as TL implants compared to BL implants showed a significantly lower maximum implant failure strength (p < .002); implant material was not significant (p = .845).

Conclusions: Based on data from implants of one specific manufacturer, IP has a significant negative impact on the fracture strength of narrow implants suffering from advanced peri-implantitis. TL implants have been more severely affected compared to BL implants and presented an increased risk for failure during normal chewing forces. In addition, this negative impact of IP on TL implants was independent of the implant material (i.e., Ti or TiZr).

Clinical Relevance: Narrow single TL implants with advanced horizontal bone loss (e.g., 5 mm), when subjected to IP, appear to have an increased fracture risk during normal function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
dental implant, dynamic loading, implant failure, Implantoplasty, mechanical complication, narrow diameter
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61874 (URN)10.1111/clr.14132 (DOI)001031888400001 ()37464268 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165314479 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Nemec, M., Schwarz, L., Bertl, M. H., Bertl, K., Gahleitner, A., Mitteroecker, P. & Jonke, E. (2023). Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis is associated with maxillary form: a geometric morphometric analysis. Clinical Oral Investigations, 27(3), 1063-1070
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Maxillary lateral incisor agenesis is associated with maxillary form: a geometric morphometric analysis
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 1063-1070Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background and objective

Agenesis of the maxillary lateral incisor occurs in up to 4% of all individuals and requires mul- tidisciplinary treatment. Its developmental origins, however, are not fully understood. Earlier studies documented genetic factors contributing to agenesis but also an association with craniofacial morphology. In this study, we assessed the associa- tion between maxillary morphology and lateral incisor agenesis by a geometric morphometric approach to disentangle the roles of developmental plasticity and genetic factors.

Materials and methods

We quantified the maxillary alveolar ridge by 19 two-dimensional landmarks on cross-sectional images of 101 computed tomography scans. We compared the shape and size of the alveolar ridge across patients with uni- lateral or bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors and patients with extracted or in situ incisors.

Results

The maxillary alveolar ridge was clearly narrower in patients with agenesis or an extracted incisor compared to the control group, whereas the contralateral side of the unilateral agenesis had an intermediate width. Despite massive individual variation, the ventral curvature of the alveolar ridge was, on average, more pronounced in the bilateral agenesis group com- pared to unilateral agenesis and tooth extraction.

Conclusions This suggests that pleiotropic genetic and epigenetic factors influence both tooth development and cranial growth, but an inappropriately sized or shaped alveolar process may also inhibit normal formation or development of the tooth bud, thus leading to dental agenesis.

Clinical relevance

Our results indicate that bilateral agenesis of the lateral incisor tends to be associated with a higher need of bone augmentation prior to implant placement than unilateral agenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Craniofacial morphology, Dental agenesis, Geometric morphometrics, Maxillary lateral incisors
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-54802 (URN)10.1007/s00784-022-04690-9 (DOI)000847274900001 ()36036293 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85137238120 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-09-08 Created: 2022-09-08 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Burisch, J., Pandis, N., Klinge, B. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study. Journal of Periodontology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: To describe the frequency and impact of oral lesions and professional dental care costs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (i.e., Crohn disease [CD] or ulcerative colitis [UC]) compared to matched controls).

Methods: IBD patients and matched controls were surveyed on general anamnestic information, eating and drinking habits, and oral health- and dental care-related questions; IBD patients were additionally surveyed on oral lesions. Problems related to oral lesions and the amount of money spent for professional dental care in the past 12 months were defined as primary outcome parameters.

Results: Answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls were analyzed. About 30% of the patients indicated having had problems with oral lesions, with CD patients having 46% higher odds and having them more often in a generalized form compared to UC patients. Further, self-reported severe periodontitis increased the odds of having oral lesions by almost 2.3-times. However, only about 12.5% of IBD patients were informed by their physician about oral lesions and about 10% indicated receiving treatment for them. Compared to controls, IBD patients required more often dental treatment and spent more money; specifically, UC and CD patients had 27 and 89% higher odds, respectively, for having spent ≥3000 DKK (ca. 440 USD) at the dentist compared to controls.

Conclusions: IBD patients have more often oral health problems and higher expenses for professional dental care compared to matched controls. This included problems with IBD-related oral lesions, but these are rarely addressed by the medical or dental team.Keywords: Crohn disease; case-control studies; colitis; dental care; inflammatory bowel diseases; surveys and questionnaires; ulcerative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
case-control studies, colitis, Crohn disease, dental care, inflammatory bowel diseases, surveys and questionnaires, ulcerative
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-62487 (URN)10.1002/JPER.23-0325 (DOI)001046841400001 ()37469002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167700301 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2023-10-23Bibliographically approved
Madsen, G. R., Bertl, K., Pandis, N., Stavropoulos, A. & Burisch, J. (2023). The Impact of Periodontitis on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, 29(3), 396-404
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Impact of Periodontitis on Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity
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2023 (English)In: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, ISSN 1078-0998, E-ISSN 1536-4844, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 396-404Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and periodontitis are chronic, progressive, inflammatory diseases with similarly complex pathogeneses that involve an interplay between dysbiotic microbiota and dysregulated immune-inflammatory responses. However, whether the presence of periodontitis is associated with IBD activity and/or its severity remains unknown. Methods An online, questionnaire-based study was answered by 1093 patients with IBD, comprising 527 patients with Crohn's disease and 566 patients with ulcerative colitis. The survey included questions on social demographics; oral health, including the Periodontal Screening Score (PESS); and IBD-related characteristics, including validated disease indices. Results Irrespective of disease subtype, patients with a reduced number of teeth and those with self-reported severe periodontitis scored significantly higher on the IBD disability index (number of teeth: coefficient, 4.93 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.21-8.66; P = .010]; periodontitis: coefficient, 3.54 [95% CI, 0.27-6.80; P = .034]) and reported increased disease activity in the preceding 12 months (number of teeth: odds ratio [OR], 1.91 [95% CI, 1.36-2.69; P < .001]; periodontitis: OR, 1.71 [95% CI, 1.27-2.31; P < .001]). There was also evidence of a weak association between self-reported severe periodontitis and current disease activity (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 0.95-1.86; P = .099). However, IBD severity, as a composite parameter of a history of surgery due to IBD and/or treatment with biological therapy, was not associated with possessing a reduced number of teeth (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.77-1.80; P = .451), nor with self-reported severe periodontitis (OR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.79-1.66; P = .467). Conclusions Periodontitis and tooth loss were significantly associated with increased IBD-related disability and more disease activity in the preceding 12 months. Our results suggest that greater attention should be paid to IBD patients' oral health. Lay Summary In this questionnaire-based study among 1093 patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), we demonstrated a significant association between the presence of periodontitis and more IBD disease activity in the last 12 months, as well as increased IBD disability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
periodontitis, IBD, disease activity
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-51693 (URN)10.1093/ibd/izac090 (DOI)000793988600001 ()35552410 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134839232 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-30 Created: 2022-05-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Al-Hotheiry, M., Sun, D., Olofsson, J., Lettner, S., Gotfredsen, K. & Stavropoulos, A. (2022). Are colored periodontal probes reliable to classify the gingival phenotype in terms of gingival thickness?. Journal of Periodontology, 93(3), 412-422
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are colored periodontal probes reliable to classify the gingival phenotype in terms of gingival thickness?
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 93, no 3, p. 412-422Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: This cross-sectional study assessed the potential of colored periodontal probes (CPP) to classify gingival phenotype in terms of gingival thickness (GT).

Methods: Buccal GT in 3 anterior teeth in each of 50 patients was measured by transgingival sounding and classified by 3 different methods by 8 examiners. Specifically, the diagnostic potential of visual judgement and transparency of a standard periodontal probe (SPP) to discriminate thin and thick gingiva, and of CPP to discriminate thin, medium, thick, or very thick gingiva was assessed.

Results: GT ranged from 0.57-2.37mm. Using CPP resulted in a medium judgement in 87% of the cases, on average, and only between 1-10 cases/examiner were judged as thick or very thick. Considering 1mm GT as relevant cut-off value, all methods showed a high positive predictive value (≥0.82) to identify thick cases, but also a high false omission rate (≥0.73) indicating that many cases classified as thin were actually thick. Further, 88% of the cases being ≤1mm, were not classified as thin with CPP; this was inferior to SPP, for which, however, still 64% of the cases being ≤1mm thick were wrongly classified. The highest, yet moderate agreement among examiners was achieved by SPP (κ = 0.427), while visual judgement and CPP showed only fair (κ = 0.211) and slight agreement (κ = 0.112), respectively.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-44766 (URN)10.1002/JPER.21-0311 (DOI)000695194100001 ()34309865 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85114723920 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-27 Created: 2021-07-27 Last updated: 2023-12-15Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-8279-7943

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