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Malmberg, Claes
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Hillbur, P., Ideland, M. & Malmberg, C. (2016). Response and responsibility: fabrication of the eco-certified citizen in Swedish curricula 1962–2011 (ed.). Journal of Curriculum Studies, 48(3), 409-426
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Response and responsibility: fabrication of the eco-certified citizen in Swedish curricula 1962–2011
2016 (English)In: Journal of Curriculum Studies, ISSN 0022-0272, E-ISSN 1366-5839, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 409-426Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article addresses the fabrication of the eco-certified citizen, an ideal – rather than real – citizen constructed through requirements of both needed knowledge and a kind of personhood, with specific qualities. The societal demands of knowledge-response to environmental problems are studied, as well as the student’s (future citizen’s) responsibility in relation to these problems, in five subsequent national curricula for the Swedish compulsory school between 1962 and 2011. How does environmental education operate as a hub for constructing desirable citizens? From a theoretical framework of governmentality, the article explores how political rationalities for society and citizenship emerge. Our findings show how recent curricula, by using space and time metaphors, fabricate the eco-certified citizen as an individualistic, globalized person who is able and willing to use scientific knowledge to make decisions and develop opinions about the world. Citizenship has evolved as a competence rather than an ongoing practice, meaning that one has to prove oneself as a legitimate citizen. This emerging, post-political, citizenship differs from citizenship posited in 1960s’ curricula – a combination of traditional family values and democratic involvement in the local society.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
curriculum, governmentality, fabrication, citizenship, Environmental education, Education for sustainable development, ESD, environmental and sustainability education, responsibilization, Nicholas Rose
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14474 (URN)10.1080/00220272.2015.1126358 (DOI)000373029900007 ()2-s2.0-85032095099 (Scopus ID)20176 (Local ID)20176 (Archive number)20176 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, H., Lundegard, I. & Malmberg, C. (2016). Students' qualification in environmental and sustainability education-epistemic gaps or composites of critical thinking (ed.). International Journal of Science Education, 38(2), 259-275
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' qualification in environmental and sustainability education-epistemic gaps or composites of critical thinking
2016 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 259-275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In an 'age of measurement' where students' qualification is a hot topic on the political agenda, it is of interest to ask what the function of qualification might implicate in relation to a complex issue as Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) and what function environmental and sustainability issues serve in science education. This paper deals with how secondary and upper secondary teachers in discussions with colleagues articulate qualification in relation to educational aims of ESD. With inspiration from discourse theory, the teachers' articulations of qualification are analysed and put in relation to other functions of education (qualification, socialisation and subjectification). The results of this study show three discourses of qualification: scientific reasoning, awareness of complexity and to be critical. The discourse of 'qualification as to be critical' is articulated as a composite of differing epistemological views. In this discourse, the teachers undulate between rationalistic epistemological views and postmodern views, in a pragmatic way, to articulate a discourse of critical thinking which serves as a reflecting tool to bring about different ways of valuing issues of sustainability, which reformulates 'matter of facts' towards 'matter of concerns'

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2016
Keywords
socio-scientific issues, qualification, Education for sustainable development
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3704 (URN)10.1080/09500693.2016.1139756 (DOI)000372095200005 ()2-s2.0-84960076022 (Scopus ID)23054 (Local ID)23054 (Archive number)23054 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, H., Lundegård, I. & Malmberg, C. (2016). Teachers as agents for social change? Myths and Subject positions in transformative sustainability education (ed.). Paper presented at Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, Örebro, Sweden (27-28 oktober 2016). Paper presented at Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, Örebro, Sweden (27-28 oktober 2016).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teachers as agents for social change? Myths and Subject positions in transformative sustainability education
2016 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In educational practice there is an ongoing discussion, about social change in relation to sustainability (Ferreira 2013; Jickling & Wals 2008, 2013; Laessö 2010). When our contemporary way of living is declared as unsustainable, and education is put to make a ‘social change’ towards a more ‘sustainable living’, we interpret this from a discourse theoretical view as the educational system becomes dislocated in the attempts of interpret this new order to strive for (Laclau & Mouffe 2001; Laclau 1990). In this state, new articulations develops to interpret how to make a new structure to stabilise the new order. Social change does not have any inherent meaning per se, it becomes formulated through its contextual use in practice. Therefore we find it fruitful to gain empirical knowledge of how teaching for ‘social change’ can be articulated in relation to sustainability. More specifically, we have formulated the following research questions as: - Which subjects positions among teachers can be identified in ESD discourses of social change? - Which 'myths' of social change can be identified in ESD discourses? By using theoretical frameworks of Laclau and Mouffe and Biesta, we identifies teachers’ subject positions and emerging ‘myths’ through analyses of articulations in teacher colleagues discussions of important aims of sustainability in relation to ESD. Discourse theory, analysing teachers discussions To analyse how 'social change' (re)articulate desirable aims in educational practice, we start from teacher discussions. The analyses focus articulations where students are supposed to act in relation to sustainability. Through the central meaning of those articulations, new spaces of representations are opened where it becomes possible to legitimate actions as natural, in the light of this new order (myth). In this study we have been able to identify three struggling ESD-discourses of ‘social change’, comprising desirable teacher-specific-positions and emerging myths of ‘social change’. twenty teachers in total were selected and divided into five groups which consisting of three to six colleagues in each group. The participants were science and social science teachers in secondary and upper secondary schools in Sweden. The chosen schools were either certified ESD-schools or actively involved in projects concerning sustainability. Each group discussion, which lasted about an hour, were recorded and transcribed. The result shows how the teacher is simultaneously identified in three struggling positions; the rational subject as a neutral conductor; the responsible subject as a role model or the reconstructing subject as a reconstructor. This depending on how schooling, socialisation towards sustainable lifestyles and political and ethical perspectives are identified as aims and educational functions (Biesta 2009), to formulate the myth of ‘social change’ in ESD. This has implications on how to acknowledge ‘social change’ as mainly being a process to empower students for ‘right’ choices or to uphold ‘social change’ as a way for students to explore new interpretations of a more sustainable living, to develop as political subjects (c.f. Lundegård & Wickaman 2012).

Keywords
ESE, social change, teachers' subject positions
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-11642 (URN)21739 (Local ID)21739 (Archive number)21739 (OAI)
Conference
Nordisk forskningskonferens om miljö- och hållbarhetsutbildning, Örebro, Sweden (27-28 oktober 2016)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, H. & Malmberg, C. (2015). Critical thinking as room for subjectification in Education for Sustainable Development (ed.). Environmental Education Research, 21(2), 239-255
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical thinking as room for subjectification in Education for Sustainable Development
2015 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 239-255Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Issues of sustainability are complex and often steeped with ethical and political questions without predefined or general answers. This paper deals with how secondary and upper secondary teachers discuss these complex issues, by analysing their aims for Education for Sustainable Development. With inspiration from discourse theory, their articulations about students as political subjects are analysed. Critical thinking emerged as a nodal point in teachers’ discussions. In this study, critical thinking is articulated as having various qualitative meanings related to different epistemological views. On one hand, critical thinking is articulated to invite room for subjectification; but on the other hand, room for subjectification is challenged when critical thinking is articulated through the educational aims of qualification and socialisation. A consequence of changing epistemological view might be that political and ethical issues take a back seat.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
Education for Sustainable Development, Environmental education, Critical thinking, Subjectification, Functions of education
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3856 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2014.940854 (DOI)000348307100006 ()2-s2.0-84921434037 (Scopus ID)17647 (Local ID)17647 (Archive number)17647 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ideland, M., Malmberg, C. & Hillbur, P. (2015). Det KRAV-märkta barnet: Om subjektskonstruktioner i lärande för hållbar utveckling (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Vetenskapsrådets Resultatdialog 2015;: (pp. 85-95). : Vetenskapsrådet
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Det KRAV-märkta barnet: Om subjektskonstruktioner i lärande för hållbar utveckling
2015 (Swedish)In: Vetenskapsrådets Resultatdialog 2015;, Vetenskapsrådet , 2015, p. 85-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Projektet Det KRAV-märkta barnet syftar till att normkritiskt problematisera lärande för hållbar utveckling. Hur bidrar denna praktik till att skapa normer för vem som är ”den goda” respektive ”den icke-önskvärda” människan? Studien, som analyserat läromedel och policydokument, visar hur skillnader mellan Vi och De Andra (re)produceras. Utifrån en idé om svensk exceptionalism konstrueras Vi som förnuftiga, altruistiska och utvecklade medan De Andra som okunniga och i behov av Vår hjälp. Det KRAV-märkta barnet är också handlingskraftigt och optimistiskt, medan uppgivenhet och ilska inte passar in i diskursen. Skyddet mot ”improduktiva” känslor blir att “göra saker” i termer av symbolhandlingar. Idén om “nödvändiga kunskaper” gör det KRAV-märkta barnet objektivt, teknologiskt lösningsinriktat och till en medveten konsument. Detta post-politiska förhållningssätt döljer strukturella orättvisor bakom individuella handlingsmöjligheter och det enskilda ”barnet” blir ansvarigt för hållbarhetsfrågorna.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Vetenskapsrådet, 2015
Keywords
postpolitisk, norm, naturvetenskap, känslor, svenskhet, social klass, styrningsmentalitet, diskurs, makt, läroplan, läromedel, miljöundervisning, Lärande för hållbar utveckling
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-16340 (URN)20023 (Local ID)978-91-7307-305-9 (ISBN)20023 (Archive number)20023 (OAI)
Note
Chapter in ReportAvailable from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2022-11-03Bibliographically approved
Ideland, M. & Malmberg, C. (2015). Environmental education as epistemological imperialism: How Swedish exceptionalism is constructed through the Otherness Machinery (ed.). In: (Ed.), (Ed.), Abstract list of WEEC 2015: . Paper presented at World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC), Gothenburg, Sweden (2015). : WEEC, Article ID 185.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Environmental education as epistemological imperialism: How Swedish exceptionalism is constructed through the Otherness Machinery
2015 (English)In: Abstract list of WEEC 2015, WEEC , 2015, article id 185Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: Sustainable development is often described as a global project, including everyone everywhere in the fight for a better ‘common future’. The aim of this paper is to problematize this inclusive project through an analysis of how good intentions in Environmental and Sustainability Education (ESE) construct and maintain differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’. We are interested in exposing social constructions of normality and otherness in the taken-for-granted good intentions within ESE. Objectives: The analysis focuses textbooks used in Swedish schools, how texts and pictures operate as cogwheels in what we call Otherness machinery, discursively constructing who is ‘normal’ and who is ‘the Other’. We examine how representations of race and nationality construct (un)desirable subjects inside the discourse of ESE. The theoretical framework builds on 1) critical race theory and whiteness studies and 2) theories on double gestures of inclusion and exclusion in education. When trying to help or foster the Orher, we are, at the same time, in a double gesture, constructing the ones in need as abjects, those who ‘need to be saved’ into a specific norm. Methods: The empirical material consists of teaching material about sustainable development: five textbooks in science, civics and geography for primary and lower secondary school and two thematic fact books for school. From the books, we extracted parts that were concerned with sustainable development and environmental issues for a closer analysis. In the analysis of the material, we studied how normality (in this case Swedishness) and Otherness are constructed and who (in terms of the entanglement of race and nationality) is representing what. The question is how Sweden, or ‘We’, is constructed in relation to the Other and what discursive consequences these positions have attached to them. Results: The result is presented through five dichotomies structuring the ESD discourse: Tradition/Civilization, Dirtiness/Purity, Chaos/Order, Ignorance/Morality and Helped/Helping. Through these dichotomies we show how differences between ‘Us’ and ‘Them’ are constructed and maintained in the textbooks about sustainable development and environment. Sweden, and Swedishness, are with help from different - uncivilized or immoral others - constructed as exceptional. We claim that these representations of race and nationality imply a colonial gaze. Conclusion: The paper addresses the risk that a child who engages in the ESE practice come to meet the world with a colonial gaze and an aim to foster the Other into a specific way of living. It discusses how the global project of sustainable development is transformed through a discourse of “Swedish exceptionalism”. In a double gesture of inclusion and exclusion, the rest of the world appears in need of help, development, or – in some cases – higher moral standards. The including ESE project must thus be understood as a colonial, and excluding practice – a form of epistemological imperialism.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WEEC, 2015
Keywords
critical race theory, discourse analysis, Environmental and sustainabiity education, Education for sustainable development, lärande för hållbar utveckling, Inclusion/exclusion, Textbook analysis, textanalys
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-16480 (URN)19351 (Local ID)19351 (Archive number)19351 (OAI)
Conference
World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC), Gothenburg, Sweden (2015)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2022-06-27Bibliographically approved
Ideland, M. & Malmberg, C. (2015). Governing ‘eco-certified children’ through pastoral power: critical perspectives on education for sustainable development (ed.). Environmental Education Research, 21(2), 173-182
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Governing ‘eco-certified children’ through pastoral power: critical perspectives on education for sustainable development
2015 (English)In: Environmental Education Research, ISSN 1350-4622, E-ISSN 1469-5871, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 173-182Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article analyses how ‘eco-certified children’ are constructed as desirable subjects in teaching materials addressing education for sustainable development. We are interested in how discourses structure this cherished practice and how this practice has become ‘natural’ and obvious for us. A discourse analysis is carried out by looking at the material through the lens of Foucault’s notion of pastoral power. The analysis departs from teaching material addressing issues on sustainable development: (1) textbooks for primary and secondary school; (2) games targeted at preschool and school children; and (3) children’s books about sustainable development. The results show that the discourse of education for sustainable development is characterized by scientific and mathematical objectiv- ity and faith in technological development. It emphasizes the right of the individ- ual and the obligation to make free, however ‘correct’, choices. In the teaching materials, the eco-certified child therefore emerges as knowing, conscious, rational, sacrificing and active. This child is constructed through knitting together personal guilt with global threats, detailed individual activities with rescuing the flock and the planet. In a concluding discussion, we discuss how ESD is framed in a neoliberal ideology. With the help of ESD, an economic discourse becomes dressed in an almost poetic language.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2015
Keywords
discourse, education for sustainable development, teaching material, power, governmentality, environmental education
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14507 (URN)10.1080/13504622.2013.879696 (DOI)000348307100002 ()2-s2.0-84921434909 (Scopus ID)17513 (Local ID)17513 (Archive number)17513 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, H., Lundegård, I. & Malmberg, C. (2015). The role of education in transition towards a more sustainable world (ed.). Paper presented at EERA-ECER, Budapest, Hungary (2015, 8-11 September). Paper presented at EERA-ECER, Budapest, Hungary (2015, 8-11 September). : EERA-ECER
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The role of education in transition towards a more sustainable world
2015 (English)Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Within this conference’s overall focus on ‘Education and transition’, the network on Environmental and Sustainability Education Research (ESER) raises the question what research tells us about education’s role in building a more sustainable world. The proposed symposium will address this key issue in ESE research, thereby combining varied research focusses and national perspectives (Sweden, Denmark and Belgium) and paying particular attention to educators’ role in facing the challenges involved. The role of education in tackling societal problems is the subject of an ongoing scholarly discussion since such problems are often translated into issues that need an ‘educational solution’ (Simons and Masschelein 2006), pre-eminently in the context of sustainability issues (Postma 2004; Van Poeck et al. 2014). A sustainable world emerges then as a challenge that can be met by learning the proper solutions, desirable attitudes, correct behaviour, necessary competences, etc. Policy-makers as well as scholars argue for ‘learning our way out’ of unsustainability (Finger and Asún 2001) and for ‘transformative learning’ (Jackson 2011). However, critics argue, sustainability issues cannot be approached as if they were solely a matter of more or better education (e.g. Biesta 2012). Considering that these issues are often very uncertain and controversial (both in factual and normative terms) and drastically affect our planet and its inhabitants it is argued that, first and foremost, sustainability issues raise democratic challenges. Thus, research about education’s role in building a more sustainable world often addresses questions of democratic thought (e.g. Lundegård and Wickman 2012; Sund and Öhman 2014) and ESE practices reveal a certain entanglement of educational and political/democratic processes. The proposed symposium focusses on this ‘intersection of politics and pedagogy’ (Biesta 2012) in the light of sustainability challenges. In doing so, we explicitly aim to move beyond a dichotomist view on the tension between a (‘committed’ and ‘instrumental’) solution-oriented versus a (‘detached’, ‘idealistic’ and ‘relativistic’) democracy-oriented approach to ESE. In order to nurture the debate on this issue, we focus on what actually takes place in diverse educational settings and on the crucial role of educators in this respect. Highlighting different aspects of this common research interest and bringing together varied national perspectives, the contributors aim to progress the theoretical conceptualisation of education in relation to sustainability transition as a process in which the political and the pedagogical are intertwined. Hasslöf, Lundegård and Malmberg elaborate on ‘social change’ in ESD from a teacher perspective. Using theoretical frameworks of Laclau and Mouffe and Biesta, they identify teachers’ subject positions (as rational subject, responsible subject and the reconstructing subject) and emerging ‘myths’ through analyses of articulations in teacher colleagues discussions of important aims of sustainability in relation to ESD. Læssøe and Van Poeck focus on how ‘change agents’ in non-formal educational settings affect the kind of educational processes that can emerge within practices pursuing a more sustainable world. Drawing on empirical analyses, they reveal the diversity of roles change agents can play and put forward an ideal typology. Connecting the latter to educational theory (metaphors of learning, functions of education) and theories linking social dynamics and social learning, the authors elaborate on how change agents face entangled political and pedagogical challenges within non-formal educational settings. Östman, Håkansson and Van Poeck depart from the re-born interest in the political dimension of ESE and investigate possibilities and risks involved in introducing the political in pluralistic ESE practice. Drawing inspiration from Mouffe’s theory of the political and Dewey’s pragmatist theory, they empirically analyse diverse educational settings. They identify situations that could be educative depending on how the educator acts and conceptualise how a pluralistic and a political dimension come together in in ESE practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EERA-ECER, 2015
Keywords
environmental and sustainability education
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-11945 (URN)27987 (Local ID)27987 (Archive number)27987 (OAI)
Conference
EERA-ECER, Budapest, Hungary (2015, 8-11 September)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2023-01-09Bibliographically approved
Byrne, J., Ideland, M., Malmberg, C. & Grace, M. (2014). Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue (ed.). International Journal of Science Education, 36(9), 1491-1509
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Climate change and everyday life: repertoires children use to negotiate a socio-scientific issue
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Science Education, ISSN 0950-0693, E-ISSN 1464-5289, Vol. 36, no 9, p. 1491-1509Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There are only a few studies about how primary school students engage in socio-scientific discussions. This study aims to add to this field of research by focusing on how 9–10-year-olds in Sweden and England handle climate change as a complex environmental socio-scientific issue (SSI), within the context of their own lives and in relation to society at large. It focuses on how different interpretative repertoires were used by the students in discussions to legitimise or question their everyday lifestyles. They discussed four possible options that a government might consider to help reduce carbon dioxide production. Six main repertoires were identified: Everyday life, Self-Interest, Environment, Science and Technology, Society and Justice. The Everyday life repertoire was used when students related their discussion to their everyday lifestyles. Science and technology-related solutions were offered to maintain or improve things, but these were sometimes rather unrealistic. Arguments related to environment and health frequently appeared to have a superior status compared to the others. Findings also highlighted how conflicts between the students were actually productive by bringing in several perspectives to negotiate the solutions. These primary school students were, therefore, able to discuss and negotiate a complex real-world SSI. Students positioned themselves as active contributors to society, using their life experiences and limited knowledge to understand the problems that affected their everyday lives. Honing these skills within a school science community of practice could facilitate primary students’ engagement with SSIs and empower them as citizens.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2014
Keywords
Primary school, Global warming, Discursive repertoires, Discourse analysis, science education, Environmental education
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14436 (URN)10.1080/09500693.2014.891159 (DOI)000335862200006 ()2-s2.0-84900466748 (Scopus ID)17512 (Local ID)17512 (Archive number)17512 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Hasslöf, H., Ekborg, M. & Malmberg, C. (2014). Discussing sustainable development among teachers: an analysis from a conflict perspective (ed.). International Journal of Environmental and Science Education, 9(1), 41-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Discussing sustainable development among teachers: an analysis from a conflict perspective
2014 (English)In: International Journal of Environmental and Science Education, ISSN 1306-3065, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 41-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Education for Sustainable Development has been discussed as problematic, as a top down directive promoting an ―indoctrinating‖ education. The concept of the intertwined dimensions (economic, social-cultural, and environmental) of sustainable development is seen both as an opportunity and as a limitation for pluralistic views of sustainability. In this paper we study possibilities that allow different perspectives of sustainability to emerge and develop in discussions. We focus on the conflicting perspectives of the intertwined dimensions in some main theoretical models in combination with the use of Wertsch’s function of speech framework to construct a conflict reflection tool. As an illustrative case, we apply this conflict reflection tool to an analysis of a discussion among seven secondary school teachers on climate change. The results in this particular example show the dynamics of speech genre and content in developing different perspectives. We conclude our paper with a discussion of the conflicting view of the integrated dimensions of sustainability in relation to an agonistic pluralistic approach, and we consider its relevance in an educational context.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
International Society of Educational Research, 2014
Keywords
Education for sustainable development, Environmental education, Agonistic pluralism, Dialogic function
National Category
Social Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-3378 (URN)17646 (Local ID)17646 (Archive number)17646 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-01-16Bibliographically approved
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