Malmö University Publications
Change search
Link to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Publications (7 of 7) Show all publications
Korol, L., Fietzer, A. W., Bevelander, P. & Pasichnyk, I. (2023). Are Immigrants Scapegoats?: The Reciprocal Relationships Between Subjective Well-Being, Political Distrust, and Anti-immigrant Attitudes in Young Adulthood. Psychological Reports, 126(3), 1392-1415, Article ID 00332941211065951.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Immigrants Scapegoats?: The Reciprocal Relationships Between Subjective Well-Being, Political Distrust, and Anti-immigrant Attitudes in Young Adulthood
2023 (English)In: Psychological Reports, ISSN 0033-2941, E-ISSN 1558-691X, Vol. 126, no 3, p. 1392-1415, article id 00332941211065951Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the impact of native youth's subjective well-being on exclusionary attitudes toward immigrants, seeking to understand the relationship between subjective well-being, political distrust, and anti-immigrant attitudes over time. Using longitudinal data, we followed three cohorts of native young adults (N = 1352; Mage = 22.72, SD = 3.1) in Sweden over a period of 2 years. The results showed that subjective well-being did not predict an increase in anti-immigrant attitudes among native youth, but anti-immigrant attitudes had a significant impact on subjective well-being. The data also found bidirectional and mutually reinforcing relationships between subjective well-being and political distrust, and between political distrust and anti-immigrant attitudes. These results highlight that improving young adults' subjective well-being represents an important basis for preventing the development of political distrust, which in turn could reduce native youth's susceptibility to adopt hostile attitudes toward immigrants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
Keywords
young adults, anti-immigrant attitudes, subjective well-being, political distrust
National Category
Sociology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-49980 (URN)10.1177/00332941211065951 (DOI)000748522600001 ()35014588 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85122790659 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-07 Created: 2022-02-07 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Korol, L. & Bevelander, P. (2023). Does young adults' life satisfaction promote tolerance towards immigrants?: The role of political satisfaction and social trust. Current Psychology, 42(7), 5599-5610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Does young adults' life satisfaction promote tolerance towards immigrants?: The role of political satisfaction and social trust
2023 (English)In: Current Psychology, ISSN 1046-1310, E-ISSN 1936-4733, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 5599-5610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much prior research relies on the idea that antipathy towards immigrants is primarily driven by natives' perceptions of the threat that immigrants represent to their economic, cultural or national well-being. Yet little is known about whether subjective well-being affects attitudes toward immigrants. This study aimed to examine whether life satisfaction would foster tolerance towards immigrants over time via the indirect influence of political satisfaction and social trust. The sample comprised young native adults (N = 1352; M age = 22.72; SD = 3.1) in Sweden. The results revealed that young adults who were satisfied with important life domains were more likely to extend their satisfaction towards the political system, which consequently resulted in a generalised expectation of trustworthiness and a widening of their circles of trusted others. This then translates into more positive attitudes toward immigrants. The findings provide evidence that it is the causal relationship between political satisfaction and social trust (rather than social trust in itself) which promotes the positive impact of life satisfaction on tolerance towards immigrants. The study highlights that fostering political satisfaction and social trust may play an important role in shaping young people's positive attitudes towards immigrants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Young adults, Tolerance, Life satisfaction, Political satisfaction, Social trust, Attitudes towards immigrants
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-43963 (URN)10.1007/s12144-021-01923-0 (DOI)000655889900006 ()2-s2.0-85106721451 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-06-22 Created: 2021-06-22 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Korol, L. & Bevelander, P. (2023). The Power of Positive Thinking: How Positive Opinions of Refugees’ Impact on the Host Society Generate Positive Behavioural Intentions. The Journal of Refugee Studies, 36(1), 22-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Power of Positive Thinking: How Positive Opinions of Refugees’ Impact on the Host Society Generate Positive Behavioural Intentions
2023 (English)In: The Journal of Refugee Studies, ISSN 0951-6328, E-ISSN 1471-6925, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 22-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Much prior research has focused on understanding how host nationals’ negative opinions of the impact of migration and arriving communities affect their attitudes towards newcomers. Yet, the role of host nationals’ positive opinions has remained largely underinvestigated. The present study aims to move beyond the negative intergroup paradigm and contribute to the literature by examining whether positive opinions of refugees’ impact on the host society are related to host nationals’ positive behavioural intentions towards them. Specifically, the study investigated (1) the mediating role of social proximity in the relationship between positive opinions of refugees’ impact and readiness to assist them and (2) symbolic and realistic threats as potential moderators that might influence this direct/indirect relationship. The results provide initial evidence of the important role of positive opinions of refugees’ impact on the host community in promoting positive behavioural intentions towards newcomers via indirect association with closer social proximity. Moreover, our findings suggest that this relationship might be particularly beneficial for host nationals who perceive immigrants as imposing a realistic threat to their lives and to society as a whole—individuals who tend to be amongst the most prejudice-prone and resistant to change. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-57356 (URN)10.1093/jrs/feac065 (DOI)000903020500001 ()
Available from: 2023-01-11 Created: 2023-01-11 Last updated: 2023-07-06Bibliographically approved
Korol, L. & Bevelander, P. (2021). Ethnic Harassment and the Protective Effect of Positive Parenting on Immigrant Youths' Antisocial Behavior. Child and Youth Care Forum, 50, 805-826
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ethnic Harassment and the Protective Effect of Positive Parenting on Immigrant Youths' Antisocial Behavior
2021 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 50, p. 805-826Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background The existing literature suggests that positive parenting might serve as a protective factor against immigrant adolescents' engagement in externalizing difficulties when they are exposed to negative experiences of ethnic derogation. To date, little is known, however, about whether different dimensions of positive parenting may moderate the detrimental impact of ethnic harassment at school on immigrant youth's antisocial behavior. Objective This study aimed to investigate which specific dimensions of positive parenting may act as a buffer against the detrimental impact of ethnic harassment at school on immigrant adolescents' antisocial behavior (i.e., delinquency and violence). Method Using longitudinal data, we followed first- and second-generation immigrant adolescents (N = 365; Mage = 13.93, SD = .80; 46% girls; 37% first-generation) in Sweden over a period of one year. Data collection at Time 1 (T1) was completed in the spring semester of the school year, and Time 2 (T2) assessments took place a year after the first data collection. We ran a series of regressions analyses via the SPSS PROCESS macro for each dimension of positive parenting behavior and each type of antisocial behavior. Results We found that ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents who received parental warmth, perceived their influence on family decisions and whose parents were aware of their children's daily activities were less likely to engage in delinquency and violence one year later. In addition, we saw that immigrant youth whose parents actively sought information about their offsprings' lives were less prone to display violence in the face of ethnic harassment. Conclusions The results suggest that parents are important in overriding the noxious effects of negative peer interactions targeting their children's ethnic background, even during an adolescence marked by significant changes in child-parent and child-peer relationships. These findings might inform the development of intervention components for testing in interventions studies aimed at preventing immigrant youths' antisocial behavior and future involvement in violent criminal offences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2021
National Category
International Migration and Ethnic Relations
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-41066 (URN)10.1007/s10566-021-09600-w (DOI)000610469200001 ()2-s2.0-85099865578 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-08 Created: 2021-03-08 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Stattin, H. & Korol, L. (2021). Is love politically blind?: The role that the romantic partner plays for young adults' socio-political interest. Journal of Youth Studies, 24(4), 481-498
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Is love politically blind?: The role that the romantic partner plays for young adults' socio-political interest
2021 (English)In: Journal of Youth Studies, ISSN 1367-6261, E-ISSN 1469-9680, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 481-498Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study examined the political interest of young adults who over two years moved in or out of a romantic relationship or had a romantic partner at both ages. The sample comprised young adults in Sweden (n = 1335; M-age = 22.75, SD = 3.01). Among those who entered a romantic relationship, the partners seemed to adjust to each other's political interest, but when separations occurred, the influence of the former partner vanished. Attending to similarities and dissimilarities in both partners' levels of political interest, we hypothesized that in relations where both partners had high political interest, their political discussions would occur frequently, and they were likely to reinforce each other's search for information about society more than in other romantic relationships. This hypothesis was confirmed. We also examined if partners with different political interest had lower partner commitments and later become singles more often than couples with similar political interests. We found few differences. Overall, both variable- and person-oriented analyses showed that romantic partners can both thwart and increase the political interest of young adults. Apparently, young adults' romantic partners play a significant role for their political interest.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Routledge, 2021
Keywords
Young adults, romantic partner, political interest, political discussions, affective relationships
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-17065 (URN)10.1080/13676261.2020.1742301 (DOI)000520561200001 ()2-s2.0-85082332127 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-04-28 Created: 2020-04-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Korol, L. (2021). Unpacking the interplay between multicultural personality and cross-group friendships in promoting positive outgroup attitudes. In: Tobias Altmann (Ed.), Friendship in Cultural and Personality Psychology: International Perspectives (pp. 339-360). Nova Science Publishers, Inc.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Unpacking the interplay between multicultural personality and cross-group friendships in promoting positive outgroup attitudes
2021 (English)In: Friendship in Cultural and Personality Psychology: International Perspectives / [ed] Tobias Altmann, Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2021, p. 339-360Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This chapter brings together research on individual differences and cross-group interactions in promoting positive outgroup orientations among native majority youth. Recent research has begun to shift away from the traditional focus on prejudice reduction and gravitate towards understanding processes that prompt individuals to have positive feelings and intentions towards different ethnic and cultural outgroups. Extending this emerging line of research, this chapter reviews the findings on the role of individual differences in multicultural personality and cross-group friendships in generating positive outgroup attitudes (i.e., ethnic tolerance and allophilia) among young people. It concludes by discussing the practical implications of promoting young people's positive outgroup attitudes as well as fostering more positive and pro-social outgroup orientations towards representatives of different ethnic and cultural groups. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2021
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56867 (URN)9781536199420 (ISBN)9781536198911 (ISBN)
Available from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-07-04Bibliographically approved
Korol, L. & Stattin, H. (2021). Why Do Ethnically Harassed Immigrant Adolescents Engage in Violent Behaviors?: The Role of Affiliation With Violent Peers. Journal of Early Adolescence, 41(6), 809-839, Article ID 0272431620961458.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Why Do Ethnically Harassed Immigrant Adolescents Engage in Violent Behaviors?: The Role of Affiliation With Violent Peers
2021 (English)In: Journal of Early Adolescence, ISSN 0272-4316, E-ISSN 1552-5449, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 809-839, article id 0272431620961458Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study aimed to analyze affiliations with violent peers as an underlying mechanism that associates ethnic harassment with violent behaviors among immigrant youth (N= 365;M-age= 13.93,SD= 0.80), and also identify the risk factors in this relation. The results revealed that identification with an immigrant peer crowd at school made ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents more inclined to associate with violent peers and, in turn, engage in violent behaviors over time. Immigrant youth's orientation toward the mainstream culture was not found to either elevate or buffer the effect of ethnic harassment on youth's affiliation with violent peers. Yet, ethnically harassed immigrant adolescents were shown to be more prone to violent behaviors over time when they were less orientated toward Swedish culture. The findings suggest that preventing ethnicity-based harassment and diversifying adolescents' peer groups at schools may be a way to prevent immigrant adolescents' involvement in violent behaviors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2021
Keywords
ethnic harassment, violent behaviors, affiliation with violent peers, immigrant crowd affiliation, cultural orientation, immigrant adolescents
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-36695 (URN)10.1177/0272431620961458 (DOI)000574886500001 ()2-s2.0-85091687444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-11-10 Created: 2020-11-10 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-6434-0982

Search in DiVA

Show all publications