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Pillai, R. S., Kothari, S. F., Svensson, P. & Castrillon, E. (2024). Comparison of force profiles from two musculoskeletal palpation methods: A methodological study. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Comparison of force profiles from two musculoskeletal palpation methods: A methodological study
2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: The Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) protocol recommends a 5 s and 1 kg force dynamic palpation around the lateral condylar pole of the temporomandibular joint. However, the accuracy and precision of the generated force are not known.Objective: To assess and compare the force profiles generated from dynamic palpation manually and using a palpometer, based on the forces and time recommendations suggested by the DC/TMD protocol.Methods: Nineteen healthy adults applied forces of 0.5 kg, 1.0 kg and 2.0 kg on a calibrated force sensor in a circular motion within target times of 2 s and 5 s. Participants used their right index finger for manual palpation and a calibrated palpometer for device-assisted palpation. Ten repetitions of each target force at both target times were applied. Time taken to complete each application was recorded. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used for analysis of accuracy measured as the relative difference between targeted force and actual force values and precision measured as the coefficient of variation (CV) within the 10 repeated measurements.Results: Accuracy was significantly lower (better) and precision higher (lower CV) with the palpometer than with manual palpation (p < .001). There were significant differences in accuracy and precision between the different forces but not palpation times. Most participants could not achieve the target times and tended to be faster, irrespective of the palpation method (p > .063).Conclusion: A palpometer is a more accurate and precise palpation method for dynamic force assessment compared to manual palpation; however, it remains difficult to standardize the palpation duration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
arthralgia, DC/TMD, dynamic force, palpation, temporomandibular joint
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-65486 (URN)10.1111/joor.13651 (DOI)001145541700001 ()38240374 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182623587 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-29 Created: 2024-01-29 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Iwata, Y., Nishimori, H., Iida, T., Masuda, M., Yoshida, K., Ishii, Y., . . . Komiyama, O. (2024). Effect of clinical experience and training with visual feedback on standardized palpation outcomes: Potential implications for assessment of jaw muscle sensitivity. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(3), 601-610
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Effect of clinical experience and training with visual feedback on standardized palpation outcomes: Potential implications for assessment of jaw muscle sensitivity
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 601-610Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The evaluation of muscle pain and sensitivity by manual palpation is an important part of the clinical examination in patients with myalgia. However, the effects of clinical experience and visual feedback on palpation of the masticatory muscles with or without a palpometer are not known.

Objective: To estimate the effects of clinical experience and visual feedback on the accuracy of palpation in standardized settings.

Methods: Thirty-two dentists (age 35 ± 11 years) classified as either specialists (n = 16) or generalists (n = 16) participated in this experiment. All dentists were instructed to target force levels of 500- or 1000-gf, as determined on an electronic scale using either standardized palpometers or manual palpation (MP). All dentists participated in four different tests: MP, MP with visual feedback (MPVF), palpometer (PAL) and PAL with visual feedback (PALVF). Actual force values for each type of palpation from 0 to 2, 2 to 5 and 0 to 5 s were analysed by calculating target force level.

Results: The relative differences during 2-5 and 0-5 s with 1000 gf were significantly lower for generalists than for specialists (p < .05). In generalists and specialists, the coefficients of variation and the relative differences during 2-5 s were significantly lower for PAL and PALVF than for MP (p < .05).

Conclusions: These findings suggest that the use of a palpometer, but not clinical experience with palpation of masticatory muscles, increases the accuracy of palpation, and ≥2 s of palpation with a palpometer is optimal for masticatory muscles.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
clinical experience, masticatory muscles, myalgia, palpation, standardized palpometer, visual feedback
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64144 (URN)10.1111/joor.13629 (DOI)001108369400001 ()37994202 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177567972 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2024-02-15Bibliographically approved
Manfredini, D., Ahlberg, J., Lavigne, G. J., Svensson, P. & Lobbezoo, F. (2024). Five years after the 2018 consensus definitions of sleep and awake bruxism: An explanatory note. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(3), 623-624
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Five years after the 2018 consensus definitions of sleep and awake bruxism: An explanatory note
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 3, p. 623-624Article in journal, Editorial material (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64103 (URN)10.1111/joor.13626 (DOI)001108376600001 ()37994212 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177553059 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-06 Created: 2023-12-06 Last updated: 2024-02-15Bibliographically approved
Madhan, S., Nascimento, G. G., Ingerslev, J., Cornelis, M., Pinholt, E. M., Cattaneo, P. M. & Svensson, P. (2024). Health-related quality of life, jaw function and sleep-disordered breathing among patients with dentofacial deformity. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health-related quality of life, jaw function and sleep-disordered breathing among patients with dentofacial deformity
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, ISSN 0305-182XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background and ObjectivesPatients with dentofacial deformity (DFD) requiring orthognathic treatment have poor aesthetics, jaw function and psychological well-being, which potentially affect the quality of life. This study aimed to investigate the health-related general, oral and orthognathic quality of life, jaw function and sleep-disordered breathing at different stages of orthognathic surgical treatment.MethodsA total of 120 consecutive patients with DFD were recruited and grouped as pre-orthodontic treatment (group 1), pre-surgery (group 2), 4 months post-surgery (group 3), 24 months post-surgery (group 4) and in addition 30 controls without DFD (group 0). Outcomes were assessed using general health Short Form Survey (SF-36), Oral Health Impact (OHIP-14), Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (OQLQ), STOP-Bang and Jaw Function Limitation Scale (JFLS) questionnaires. In addition, presence or absence of pain was recorded. Data were tested with analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis test, Tukey post hoc test and structural equation modelling (SEM).ResultsResults revealed SF-36 (p = .814) and STOP-Bang (p = .143) total scores did not differ between control and treatment groups. In contrast, OHIP-14, OQLQ and JFLS total scores differed between groups (p = .001). Higher scores were observed in groups 1 (p = .001), 2 (p = .001) and 3 (p = .041) compared to group 0, indicating poor oral health in patients with DFD. Importantly, in group 4, oral health-related quality of life was better, and OHIP-14 (p = .936) and JFLS (p = .572) scores did not differ from controls. OQLQ scores of group 4 were significantly lower than group 1 (p = .001) but higher than group 0 (p = .013). SEM results revealed a significant negative associations of pain with JFLS and OQLQ; OHIP-14 with OQLQ; OHIP-14 with SF-36; and finally STOP-Bang with SF-36. Positive associations were observed between JFLS and OHIP-14; OHIP-14 and OQLQ.ConclusionOral health-related quality of life and jaw function appears to be improved 24 months after orthognathic surgery. Pain and limitation in jaw function had a negative association with health-related quality of life. Through structural modelling equation, we identified negative association of pain and limitation in jaw function with oral health, which further has negative effects on general health in patients with detofacial deformity. Our finding revealed significant decrease in OHIP-14, OQLQ and JFLS scores at 24 months follow-up indicate an improvement in oral health and limitation in jaw function after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery.image

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
dentofacial deformities, oral health, orthognathic surgery, pain, quality of life, sleep apnea
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-65485 (URN)10.1111/joor.13619 (DOI)001144480600001 ()38239176 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85182449978 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-29 Created: 2024-01-29 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Caetano, J. P., Goettems, M. L., Nascimento, G. G., Jansen, K., da Silva, R. A., Svensson, P. & Boscato, N. (2024). Influence of malocclusion on sleep bruxism and orofacial pain: data from a study in school children. Clinical Oral Investigations, 28(2), Article ID 142.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Influence of malocclusion on sleep bruxism and orofacial pain: data from a study in school children
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2024 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 28, no 2, article id 142Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives This cross-sectional school-based study explored the influence of malocclusion on temporomandibular disorders (TMD) pain complaints, and whether this association would be mediated by sleep bruxism in a representative sample of 7- to 8-year-old children. Methods Path analysis estimated direct, indirect, and total effects of occlusal features on sleep bruxism and TMD pain in 7- to 8-year-old children. Occlusal features were assessed with Dental Aesthetic Index (DAI), orofacial pain complaints using the TMD pain screener, possible sleep bruxism based on self-reports, and probable sleep bruxism based on self-reports combined with clinical findings. Structural equation modeling analyzed data with confounding factors. Results From 580 participants, possible sleep bruxism was observed in 136 children (31.5%), probable sleep bruxism in 30 children (6.7%), and TMD pain complaints in 78 children (13.8%). Malocclusion had no direct effect on either possible sleep bruxism [standardized coefficient (SC) 0.000; p = 0.992], or TMD pain complaints (SC - 0.01; p = 0.740). When probable sleep bruxism was set as the mediator of interest, malocclusion did not directly affect probable sleep bruxism (SC 0.01; p = 0.766), nor TMD pain complaints (SC - 0.02; p = 0.515). A direct effect of probable sleep bruxism on TMD pain complaints was observed with an SC of 0.60 (p < 0.001). However, in neither case, malocclusion indirectly affected TMD pain complaints via bruxism. Conclusion Malocclusion in 7- to 8-year-old children did not directly influence possible or probable sleep bruxism or TMD pain complaints. Instead, probable sleep bruxism was strongly associated with TMD pain complaints. Clinical significance The impact of occlusal features on TMD pain complaints and bruxism has been a long-standing controversy in dentistry. However, the scientific literature linking this association may be inconsistent, mainly due to biased sample selection methods with inadequate consideration of confounders. Further research should try to identify additional risk factors for TMD pain in addition to probable sleep bruxism in children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2024
Keywords
Malocclusion, Screen time, Temporomandibular joint disorders, Bruxism, Child, Cross-sectional studies
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66092 (URN)10.1007/s00784-024-05545-1 (DOI)001160884300001 ()38347236 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-26 Created: 2024-02-26 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Kothari, S. F., Devendran, A., Sorensen, A. B., Nielsen, J. F., Svensson, P. & Kothari, M. (2024). Occurrence, presence and severity of bruxism and its association with altered state of consciousness in individuals with severe acquired brain injury. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 143-149
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Occurrence, presence and severity of bruxism and its association with altered state of consciousness in individuals with severe acquired brain injury
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 143-149Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Excessive jaw muscle activity is a frequent complication after acquired brain injury (ABI).

Objective: The study aimed to identify the occurrence and severity of jaw muscle activity and its association with altered state of consciousness in patients with ABI.

Methods: A total of 14 severe ABI patients with varied altered state of consciousness were recruited. A single-channel electromyographic (EMG) device was used to assess the jaw muscle activity for three consecutive nights during Week 1 and Week 4 following admission. Differences in number of EMG episodes/h between Week 1 and 4 were analysed using non-parametric tests and association between the EMG activity and altered state of consciousness were analysed using Spearman's correlation test.

Results: Nine of fourteen (64%) patients showed indications of bruxism (cutoff: >15 EMG episodes/h). The average EMG episodes/h at admission were 44.5 ± 13.6 with no significant changes after Week 4 of admission (43 ± 12.9; p = .917). The EMG episodes/h ranged from 2 to 184 during Week 1 and 4-154 during Week 4. There were no significant correlations between the number of EMG episodes/h during the three nights and the individuals altered state of consciousness during Week 1 and Week 4.

Conclusion: Patients with ABI had a conspicuously high but variable level of jaw muscle activity at admission and it tend to remain high after 4 week of hospitalisation which could potentially lead to adverse effects such as excessive tooth wear, headaches and pain in jaw muscles. The lack of associations between individuals altered level of consciousness and EMG activity could be due to low sample size and further studies are clearly warranted in this patient group with special needs. Single-channel EMG devices can record jaw muscle activity early in the hospitalisation period and might be a helpful tools for early detection of bruxism in ABI patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
brain injury, bruxism, consciousness, GrindCare, jaw muscle activity, stroke and traumatic brain injury
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61913 (URN)10.1111/joor.13540 (DOI)001020084800001 ()37325820 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85164159381 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bracci, A., Lobbezoo, F., Colonna, A., Bender, S., Conti, P. C., Emodi-Perlman, A., . . . Manfredini, D. (2024). Research routes on awake bruxism metrics: implications of the updated bruxism definition and evaluation strategies.. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 150-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research routes on awake bruxism metrics: implications of the updated bruxism definition and evaluation strategies.
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 150-161Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: In line with a similar recent proposal for sleep bruxism (SB), defining clinically oriented research routes to implement knowledge on awake bruxism (AB) metrics is important for an enhanced comprehension of the full bruxism spectrum, i.e. better assessment and more efficient management.

METHODS: We summarised current strategies for AB assessment and proposed a research route for improving its metrics.

RESULTS: Most of the literature focuses on bruxism in general or SB in particular, whilst knowledge on AB is generally fragmental. Assessment can be based on non-instrumental or instrumental approaches. The former include self-report (questionnaires, oral history) and clinical examination, whilst the latter include electromyography (EMG) of jaw muscles during wakefulness as well as the technology-enhanced ecological momentary assesment (EMA). Phenotyping of different AB activities should be the target of a research task force. In the absence of available data on the frequency and intensity of wake-time bruxism-type masticatory muscle activity, any speculation about the identification of thresholds and criteria to identify bruxers is premature. Research routes in the field must focus on the improvement of data reliability and validity.

CONCLUSIONS: Probing deeper into the study of AB metrics is a fundamental step to assist clinicians in preventing and managing the putative consequences at the individual level. The present manuscript proposes some possible research routes to advance current knowledge. At different levels, instrumentally-based and subject-based information must be gathered in a universally accepted standardized approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Assessment, Awake Bruxism, Bruxism, Evaluation, STAB
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61393 (URN)10.1111/joor.13514 (DOI)001009692600001 ()37191494 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162055444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Manfredini, D., Ahlberg, J., Aarab, G., Bender, S., Bracci, A., Cistulli, P. A., . . . Lobbezoo, F. (2024). Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 29-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 29-58Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This paper aims to present and describe the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB), an instrument that was developed to provide a multidimensional evaluation of bruxism status, comorbid conditions, aetiology and consequences.

Methods: The rationale for creating the tool and the road map that led to the selection of items included in the STAB has been discussed in previous publications.

Results: The tool consists of two axes, specifically dedicated to the evaluation of bruxism status and consequences (Axis A) and of bruxism risk and etiological factors and comorbid conditions (Axis B). The tool includes 14 domains, accounting for a total of 66 items. Axis A includes the self-reported information on bruxism status and possible consequences (subject-based report) together with the clinical (examiner report) and instrumental (technology report) assessment. The Subject-Based Assessment (SBA) includes domains on Sleep Bruxism (A1), Awake Bruxism (A2) and Patient's Complaints (A3), with information based on patients' self-report. The Clinically Based Assessment (CBA) includes domains on Joints and Muscles (A4), Intra- and Extra-Oral Tissues (A5) and Teeth and Restorations (A6), based on information collected by an examiner. The Instrumentally Based Assessment (IBA) includes domains on Sleep Bruxism (A7), Awake Bruxism (A8) and the use of Additional Instruments (A9), based on the information gathered with the use of technological devices. Axis B includes the self-reported information (subject-based report) on factors and conditions that may have an etiological or comorbid association with bruxism. It includes domains on Psychosocial Assessment (B1), Concurrent Sleep-related Conditions Assessment (B2), Concurrent Non-Sleep Conditions Assessment (B3), Prescribed Medications and Use of Substances Assessment (B4) and Additional Factors Assessment (B5). As a rule, whenever possible, existing instruments, either in full or partial form (i.e. specific subscales), are included. A user's guide for scoring the different items is also provided to ease administration.

Conclusions: The instrument is now ready for on-field testing and further refinement. It can be anticipated that it will help in collecting data on bruxism in such a comprehensive way to have an impact on several clinical and research fields.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
STAB, assessment, awake bruxism, bruxism, diagnosis, sleep bruxism.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58481 (URN)10.1111/joor.13411 (DOI)000931474300001 ()36597658 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180535309 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-02 Created: 2023-03-02 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Manfredini, D., Ahlberg, J., Aarab, G., Bracci, A., Durham, J., Emodi-Perlman, A., . . . Lobbezoo, F. (2024). The development of the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB): An international road map.. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 15-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB): An international road map.
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 15-28Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper summarises the background reasoning and work that led to the selection of the items included in the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB), also introducing the list of items. The instrument is currently being tested for face validity and on-field comprehension. The underlying premise is that the different motor activities included in the bruxism spectrum (e.g. clenching vs. grinding, with or without teeth contact) potentially need to be discriminated from each other, based on their purportedly different aetiology, comorbidities and potential consequences. Focus should be on a valid impression of the activities' frequency, intensity and duration. The methods that can be used for the above purposes can be grouped into strategies that collect information from the patient's history (subject-based), from the clinical assessment performed by an examiner (clinically based) or from the use of instruments to measure certain outcomes (instrumentally based). The three strategies can apply to all aspects of bruxism (i.e. status, comorbid conditions, aetiology and consequences). The STAB will help gathering information on many aspects, factors and conditions that are currently poorly investigated in the field of bruxism. To this purpose, it is divided into two axes. Axis A includes the self-reported information on bruxism status and potential consequences (subject-based report) together with the clinical (examiner report) and instrumental assessment (technology report). Axis B includes the self-reported information (subject-based report) on factors and conditions that may have an etiological or comorbid role for bruxism. This comprehensive multidimensional assessment system will allow building predictive model for clinical and research purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism, assessment, awake bruxism, bruxism, sleep bruxism
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56099 (URN)10.1111/joor.13380 (DOI)000879617800001 ()36261916 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141499235 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-17 Created: 2022-11-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Vale Braido, G. V., Svensson, P., Dos Santos Proença, J., Mercante, F. G., Fernandes, G. & de Godoi Gonçalves, D. A. (2023). Are central sensitization symptoms and psychosocial alterations interfering in the association between painful TMD, migraine, and headache attributed to TMD?. Clinical Oral Investigations, 27(2), 681-690
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are central sensitization symptoms and psychosocial alterations interfering in the association between painful TMD, migraine, and headache attributed to TMD?
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2023 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 681-690Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: To determine if somatosensory function and symptoms related to central sensitization (CS) differed in individuals with painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD) according to the presence of migraine (MIG) or MIG + headache attributed to TMD (HAT).

MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study evaluated 92 adults (20-65 years), presenting painful TMD. Standard diagnostic criteria were applied to classification of painful TMD, MIG, and HAT. CS was assessed through the central sensitization inventory (CSI), wind-up ratio (WUR), pressure pain thresholds (PPT), and the conditioned pain modulation test (CPM). Psychosocial factors were evaluated by validated instruments.

RESULTS: There was a significant difference regarding gender, with more women in the group TMD + MIG + HAT (p = 0.028). TMD + MIG and TMD + MIG + HAT had significantly lower PPTs than the TMD group. No group differences were found for the WUR, CPM, or CSI. TMD + MIG + HAT had higher chronic pain intensity (p = 0.001), disability points (p = 0.045), graded chronic pain scale (p = 0.007), and higher somatization (NSPS) scores (p = 0.012), compared to the other groups.

CONCLUSION: Mechanical hyperalgesia was more pronounced in the group with the highest pain and somatization scores, while CPM and WUR did not differ between groups. Altered somatosensory function and CS may partially underlie the pathophysiology of overlapping TMD pain conditions, pointing towards additive effects of comorbid head pains.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Our results demonstrate the importance of considering the association of primary and secondary headaches during TMD assessment and its implications for maintaining the signs and symptoms of CS. This can influence the conduct of treatment, which must be multidisciplinary, and must include management of mechanisms related to CS.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2023
Keywords
Headache, Migraine disorders, Sensitization of the central nervous system, Temporomandibular Disorders, Trigeminal physiology
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56310 (URN)10.1007/s00784-022-04783-5 (DOI)000885715400001 ()36383296 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142002287 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-30 Created: 2022-11-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-5809-8037

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