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Wangel, A.-M., Persson, K., Duerlund, S., Fhager, J., Mårdhed, E., Sjögran, L., . . . Sunnqvist, C. (2024). The Core Elements of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: Time, Honest Engagement, Therapeutic Relations, Professional Nursing and Lifetime-Perspective. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 1-10
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Core Elements of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing: Time, Honest Engagement, Therapeutic Relations, Professional Nursing and Lifetime-Perspective
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2024 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, p. 1-10Article, review/survey (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Defining psychiatric and mental health nursing has been a challenge for decades, and it is still difficult to find a comprehensive definition. We have identified a possibility to clarify psychiatric and mental health nursing based on humanistic philosophy in a general psychiatric care context. The aim was therefore to identify and synthesize the theoretical frameworks from which psychiatric and mental health nursing models are developed. We systematically collected and evaluated articles based on Grounded Theory (GT) methodology regarding psychiatric or mental health nursing. The PRISMA statement for systematic reviews was used and the formal process of synthesis, as a three-step process of identifying first -, second - and third-order themes following the examples of Howell Major and Savin-Baden. The synthesis resulted in a model describing five core elements of psychiatric and mental health nursing: 'professional nursing', 'therapeutic relationships' and 'honest engagement', with time as the all-encompassing theme, including the patients' 'lifetime perspective'. Psychiatric and mental health nursing is a caring support towards recovery, where the patient's lifetime perspective must be in focus during the caring process with a relationship built on an honest engagement. Time is therefore essential for psychiatric and mental health nursing.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2024
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Research subject
Care science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66038 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2024.2305934 (DOI)38363803 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-02-19 Created: 2024-02-19 Last updated: 2024-02-19Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., Örmon, K., Axelsson, M. & Berthelsen, H. (2023). Exploring workplace violence on surgical wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional study. BMC Nursing, 22(1), Article ID 106.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring workplace violence on surgical wards in Sweden: a cross-sectional study
2023 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 106Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Workplace violence is a global threat to healthcare professionals' occupational health and safety and the situation has worsened during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to explore workplace violence directed against assistant and registered nurses working on surgical wards in Sweden.

METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in April 2022. Using a convenience sampling procedure, 198 assistant and registered nurses responded to an online questionnaire developed for this specific study. The questionnaire comprised 52 items and included, among other items, subscales from validated and previously used instruments. Data analysis included descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, and independent-samples t-test.

RESULTS: The most frequently reported type of workplace violence was humiliation (28.8%), followed by physical violence (24.2%), threats (17.7%), and unwanted sexual attention (12.1%). Patients and patients' visitors were reported as the main perpetrators of all kinds of exposure. Additionally, one third of the respondents had experienced humiliation from colleagues. Both threats and humiliation showed negative associations with work motivation and health (p < 0.05). Respondents classified as working in a high- or moderate-risk environment were more frequently exposed to threats (p = 0.025) and humiliation (p = 0.003). Meanwhile, half of the respondents were unaware of any action plans or training regarding workplace violence. However, of those who indicated that they had been exposed to workplace violence, the majority had received quite a lot or a lot of support, mainly from colleagues (range 70.8-80.8%).

CONCLUSION: Despite a high prevalence of workplace violence, and especially of humiliating acts, there appeared to be low preparedness within the hospital organizations to prevent and/or handle such incidents. To improve these conditions, hospital organizations should place more emphasis on preventive measures as part of their systematic work environment management. To help inform such initiatives, it is suggested that future research should focus on the identification of suitable measures regarding different types of incidents, perpetrators, and settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Assistant nurse, Hospital organization, Questionnaire, Registered nurse, Surgical ward, Workplace violence
National Category
Occupational Health and Environmental Health
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59297 (URN)10.1186/s12912-023-01275-z (DOI)000964222400001 ()37029387 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85152664470 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-04-20 Created: 2023-04-20 Last updated: 2023-08-25Bibliographically approved
Sjögran, L., Wangel, A.-M., Örmon, K., Sjöström, K. & Sunnqvist, C. (2023). Self-Reported Experience of Abuse During the Life Course Among Men Seeking General Psychiatric or Addiction Care-A Prevalence Study in a Swedish Context.. Violence and Victims, 38(1), 111-129
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-Reported Experience of Abuse During the Life Course Among Men Seeking General Psychiatric or Addiction Care-A Prevalence Study in a Swedish Context.
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2023 (English)In: Violence and Victims, ISSN 0886-6708, E-ISSN 1945-7073, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 111-129Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A prevalence study was conducted using the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire for men (m-NorAQ) to estimate the prevalence of self-reported experience of life-course abuse and to identify the perpetrators of the abuse. This among men seeking general psychiatric and addiction care in a Swedish context. In total, 210 men completed the questionnaire, and were included in the study. The total prevalence of life-course abuse (i.e., any emotional, physical or sexual abuse during the life course) was 75% (n = 157). The results of this study indicate the importance of identifying experiences of life-course abuse among men in general psychiatric and addiction care settings.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Publishing Company, 2023
Keywords
Emotional abuse, Physical abuse, Psychiatric nursing, Sexual abuse, Victimisation, m-NorAQ
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58547 (URN)10.1891/VV-2022-0040 (DOI)000942172500007 ()36717190 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148113648 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-03 Created: 2023-03-03 Last updated: 2023-04-19Bibliographically approved
Fhager, J., Svensson, Å., Örmon, K., Fischer, T. W. & Sjöström, K. (2023). The hairdex quality of life instrument: a translation and psychometric validation in patients with alopecia areata. Skin Health and Disease, 3(3), Article ID e220.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The hairdex quality of life instrument: a translation and psychometric validation in patients with alopecia areata
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2023 (English)In: Skin Health and Disease, E-ISSN 2690-442X, Vol. 3, no 3, article id e220Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The German Hairdex quality of life (QoL) instrument is specific to hair and scalp diseases, developed for self-rating and consists of 48 statements divided into five domains: Symptoms, Functioning, Emotions, Self-confidence and Stigmatisation. There was a need of a Swedish reliability tested, validated hair and scalp specific QoL instrument why the German Hairdex was chosen to be translated and reliability tested in a systematic way.

Objectives: To make a translation, a reliability test of stability, and validation of the German Hairdex QoL instrument among 100 Swedish patients with a dermatological ICD-10 diagnosis of alopecia areata (AA).

Methods: An eight-step method by Gudmundsson was used as a model with a forward and backward translation and with comments from an expert panel. A statistical test–retest (ICC (2,1)) analysis was made, followed by an internal consistency analysis. A comparison between the German and Swedish Hairdex-S constructs by a principal component analysis was performed.

Results: The Hairdex-S was very well accepted by patients. The ICC(2,1) test–retest showed a good to excellent correlation of 0.91 (CI [0.85–0.95]). Internal consistency was α = 0.92. Like the original Hairdex, Hairdex-S showed good factorability with a Kaiser–Meyer–Olkin measure of 0.82 and with one component explaining 70% of the variance: original Hairdex instrument (69%). When tested on patients with AA, the domains Functioning and Emotions had the strongest loadings, followed by Stigmatisation and Self-confidence. Younger AA patients at self-assessment and patients who reported to be younger at the onset of AA, scored statistically significantly higher on the Hairdex-S, indicating an overall lower QoL on domains Emotions and Functioning, respectively.

Conclusions: The Hairdex-S is very well accepted by AA patients, shows very good psychometric properties, and a very good agreement with the original Hairdex. The Swedish Hairdex instrument can be recommended for evaluation of patients QoL as well as for research purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Dermatology and Venereal Diseases
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59900 (URN)10.1002/ski2.220 (DOI)37275410 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85148341694 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-01 Created: 2023-06-01 Last updated: 2023-06-27Bibliographically approved
Manderius, C., Clintståhl, K., Sjöström, K. & Örmon, K. (2023). The psychiatric mental health nurse's ethical considerations regarding the use of coercive measures: a qualitative interview study. BMC Nursing, 22(1), Article ID 23.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The psychiatric mental health nurse's ethical considerations regarding the use of coercive measures: a qualitative interview study
2023 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: In psychiatric inpatient care, situations arise where it may be necessary to use coercive measures and thereby restrict individual autonomy. The ethical principles of healthcare, i.e., respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice, are recognized as central aspects in healthcare practice, and nurses must be clear about which ethical theories and principles to prioritize and what values are needed for a thorough ethical consideration. The aim of this study is to shed light on psychiatric mental health nurses' ethical considerations and on the factors influencing them when performing coercive measures.

METHODS: This qualitative interview study included twelve psychiatric mental health nurses with experience from psychiatric inpatient care. A content analysis was made. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and categories were formulated.

RESULTS: The study revealed a duality that created two categories: Ethical considerations that promote the patient's autonomy and health and Obstacles to ethical considerations. Based on this duality, ethical considerations were made when performing coercive measures to alleviate suffering and promote health. The result shows a high level of ethical awareness in clinical work. However, a request emerged for more theoretical knowledge about ethical concepts that could be implemented among the staff.

CONCLUSION: The psychiatric mental health nurses in this study strive to do what is best for the patient, to respect the patient's autonomy as a guiding principle in all ethical considerations, and to avoid coercive measures. An organizational ethical awareness could increase the understanding of the difficult ethical considerations that nurses face with regard to minimizing the use of coercive measures in the long run.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2023
Keywords
Autonomy, Care, Coercive, Considerations, Ethical, Psychiatric mental health nurse
National Category
Nursing Psychiatry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58518 (URN)10.1186/s12912-023-01186-z (DOI)000918436100001 ()36698105 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85146769456 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-03 Created: 2023-03-03 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Glantz, A., Sunnqvist, C. & Örmon, K. (2023). The time, places, and activities of nurses in a psychiatric inpatient context: A time and motion study with a time-geographic perspective. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 44(5), 387-395
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The time, places, and activities of nurses in a psychiatric inpatient context: A time and motion study with a time-geographic perspective
2023 (English)In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 44, no 5, p. 387-395Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nurses in psychiatric inpatient care spend less time than desired with patients and investigation of the nature of nursing in this setting is needed. This study explores how nursing activities in psychiatric inpatient wards is distributed over time, and with a time-geographic perspective show how this relates to places. Observations were used to register place, activity, and time. A constructed time-geographic chart mapped the nurses’ path which showed that nurses spent little time in places where patients are. There might be constraints that affect nursing. Nurses need to evaluate where time is spent and interventions that facilitate relationships are needed.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Care science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59464 (URN)10.1080/01612840.2023.2194990 (DOI)000975344500001 ()37126738 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85153756621 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-11 Created: 2023-05-11 Last updated: 2023-06-20Bibliographically approved
Sunnqvist, C., Berngarn, A., Ekezie, P. E., Lundgren, E., Nilsson, E. & Örmon, K. (2022). A pilot evaluation of a prehospital emergency psychiatric unit: The experiences of patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others. Perspectives in psychiatric care, 58(4), 2255-2262
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A pilot evaluation of a prehospital emergency psychiatric unit: The experiences of patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others
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2022 (English)In: Perspectives in psychiatric care, ISSN 0031-5990, E-ISSN 1744-6163, Vol. 58, no 4, p. 2255-2262Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose To explore the significance of the alliance with the Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit for patients, psychiatric and mental health nurses, and significant others, and to evaluate their experiences of treatment and care. Design and Methods A qualitative inductive interview study with 11 participants: four patients, six nurses, and one significant other. The interviews were analyzed with content analysis. Findings The analysis resulted in four subcategories: To be met with respect, presence and time, knowledge and experience, and feeling of support, and one category: A psychiatric team with knowledge and experience creating stability and a sense of self-worth. Practice Implication The Prehospital Emergency Psychiatric Unit enables a safe, person-centered service.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
content analysis, prehospital emergency psychiatric unit, psychiatric and mental health nursing, self-worth
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50462 (URN)10.1111/ppc.13055 (DOI)000754001300001 ()35148425 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124507278 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-08 Created: 2022-03-08 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Sundberg, K., Vistrand, C., Sjöström, K. & Örmon, K. (2022). Nurses' leadership in psychiatric care: A qualitative interview study of nurses' experience of leadership in an adult psychiatric inpatient care setting. Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (5), 732-743
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses' leadership in psychiatric care: A qualitative interview study of nurses' experience of leadership in an adult psychiatric inpatient care setting
2022 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, no 5, p. 732-743Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Research shows that psychiatric nursing care puts additional demands on the nurse as a leader due to the psychological complexity of care. Experience and leadership training are most important to exert leadership. In Sweden, demands for leadership exists already at the beginning of a nursing career, and in psychiatry it may lead to an overwhelming workload.

AIM/QUESTION: The aim of the present study is to highlight nurses' experiences of leading the psychiatric nursing care in an adult psychiatric context.

METHOD: A qualitative interview study of eleven registered nurses within psychiatric inpatient care. Content analysis were used for analysis.

RESULTS: Leading with combined feelings of both meaningfulness and uncertainty were the theme arising from the result.

DISCUSSION: Findings from Swedish and international studies, stresses special demands on leadership in psychiatric care. The result show that nurses perceived an ambivalence of their leadership in terms of both meaningfulness and uncertainty.

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: An official mandate to lead as well as leadership guidance in communication and teambuilding will enhance leadership, especially among newly graduated nurses. Heightened awareness within health care organisations about difficulties in leading psychiatric nursing care, could increase the possibility to create right prerequisites for leadership.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
in-patient psychiatric care, interview study, leadership, nurse, psychiatric nursing care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-41201 (URN)10.1111/jpm.12751 (DOI)000628487600001 ()33682278 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85102475633 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-10 Created: 2021-03-10 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Enander, V., Krantz, G., Lövestad, S. & Örmon, K. (2022). The killing and thereafter: intimate partner homicides in a process perspective, part II. Journal of Gender-Based Violence, 6(3), 501-517
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The killing and thereafter: intimate partner homicides in a process perspective, part II
2022 (English)In: Journal of Gender-Based Violence, ISSN 2398-6808, Vol. 6, no 3, p. 501-517Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article puts intimate partner homicide (IPH) into a process perspective, and describes the latter two stages of the IPH process, that is, ‘changing the project’ and ‘the aftermath’. The focus of analysis is on the moment when the perpetrator chooses to kill the victim, and what s/he does and says in the wake of the killing. Fifty court files, from cases involving 40 male and 10 female perpetrators, underwent thematic analysis. Regarding the final trigger pertaining to changing the project, some situational factors that trigger male-perpetrated IPH seem to differ from the corresponding factors in female-perpetrated IPH. Feelings of rejection and jealousy seemed to be more common as triggers to kill for men than for women, while some cases of female-perpetrated IPH were linked to self-defence in response to IPV. Moreover, as noted previously, no female perpetrators displayed possessiveness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Bristol: Policy Press, 2022
Keywords
intimate partner homicide, femicide, intimate partner violence, thematic analysis, process perspective
National Category
Law and Society
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-46836 (URN)10.1332/239868021X16317122802413 (DOI)000915705900008 ()2-s2.0-85139384226 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-13 Created: 2021-11-13 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Jakobsson, J., Örmon, K., Berthelsen, H. & Axelsson, M. (2022). Workplace violence from the perspective of hospital ward managers in Sweden: A qualitative study. Journal of Nursing Management, 30(6), 1523-1529
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Workplace violence from the perspective of hospital ward managers in Sweden: A qualitative study
2022 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 1523-1529Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The aims of the study are to explore workplace violence perpetrated by patients or visitors from the perspective of hospital ward managers and to describe how ward managers perceive their leadership role and manage related incidents.

BACKGROUND: Few studies focus on workplace violence from the perspective of ward managers even though they are the closest managers to the operational staff.

METHOD: Fifteen semistructured interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

RESULTS: Four categories emerged: the face of workplace violence, a two-fold assignment, strive towards readiness to act, and managing incidents.

CONCLUSION: While the most common acts of workplace violence are considered less serious and related to patients' medical conditions or dissatisfied visitors, hospital organizations focus on serious but rarely occurring incidents. Consequently, ward managers have limited opportunities to ensure a safe work environment on an everyday basis.

IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: To support ward managers' occupational safety and health management, workplace violence prevention and management should be acknowledged as an important responsibility for senior management in hospitals. It is important to identify incidents that most likely will occur at the wards and to create strategies related to those incidents. Strategies could include risk assessments, prevention, evaluation, education and reflection combined with, for example, scenario training.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
content analysis, interviews, nurse manager, qualitative methods, workplace violence
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-45016 (URN)10.1111/jonm.13423 (DOI)000684026200001 ()34273122 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85112150098 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-08-20 Created: 2021-08-20 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
Intimate partner homicide in west Sweden 2000-2016; Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV)Male victims of violence and their mental ill health during the life course; Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV)Sexual health in patient with inflammatory bowel disease: how adolescents (15-18) and young adults (19-25) experience their sexual health during inflammatory bowel disease; Malmö UniversityTime geography life charts - a method in psychiatric care; Malmö UniversitySexual health in adolescents and young adults with inflammatory bowel disease: patients and professionals' perspective.; Malmö University
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0228-1358

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