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Stavropoulos, AndreasORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8161-3754
Publications (10 of 198) Show all publications
Liu, C. C., Dixit, N., Hatz, C. R., Janson, T. M., Bastendorf, K.-D., Belibasakis, G. N., . . . Schmidlin, P. R. (2024). Air powder waterjet technology using erythritol or glycine powders in periodontal or peri-implant prophylaxis and therapy: A consensus report of an expert meeting. Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, 10(1), Article ID e855.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Air powder waterjet technology using erythritol or glycine powders in periodontal or peri-implant prophylaxis and therapy: A consensus report of an expert meeting
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2024 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 10, no 1, article id e855Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To attain a collective expert opinion on the use of air powder waterjet technology (APWT) with erythritol and glycine powders in the prophylaxis and therapy of periodontal and peri-implant diseases.

Material and methods: In the first step, a modified one-round online Delphi survey including 44 five-point Likert scale questions was conducted among a group of 10 expert clinicians and researchers with thorough knowledge and experience in this topic. In the second step, the single questions and the survey results were discussed during a meeting, and consensus statements were formulated, respectively.

Results: An agreement was reached on most items, especially opinions supporting glycine and erythritol powders as favorable with respect to efficiency, safety, and comfort. More scientific evidence is needed to support the improvement in clinical attachment on teeth and implants, especially when APWT with erythritol is used. In addition, APWT needs more long-term evaluation and studies in terms of microbiome/microbiological effects as well as effects on the inflammatory response on natural teeth and implants, also in light of a guided biofilm therapy concept.

Conclusions: In line with the expert opinions and supported by the evidence, it was concluded that the use of APWT with erythritol and glycine powders in nonsurgical periodontal and peri-implant therapy and prophylaxis is patient compliant and efficient.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
airflowing, air polishing, peri-implantitis, periodontitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66113 (URN)10.1002/cre2.855 (DOI)001160451900001 ()38345462 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184717389 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-02-26 Created: 2024-02-26 Last updated: 2024-05-20Bibliographically approved
Isler, S. C., Bellon, B., Foss, M., Pippenger, B., Stavropoulos, A. & Andersen, O. Z. (2024). Assessing the osseointegration potential of a strontium releasing nanostructured titanium oxide surface: A biomechanical study in the rabbit tibia plateau model. Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, 10(1)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessing the osseointegration potential of a strontium releasing nanostructured titanium oxide surface: A biomechanical study in the rabbit tibia plateau model
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2024 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 10, no 1Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To investigate the impact of a Ti-Sr-O technology, applied to either a turned surface or an SLA surface, on the mechanical robustness of osseointegration, benchmarked against the SLActive surface.

Material and methods: Ti discs (6.25-mm-diameter and 2-mm-thick) with three different surfaces were inserted on the proximal-anterior part of the tibial plateau of adult Swedish loop rabbits: (I) turned surface modified with Ti-Sr-O (turned + Ti-Sr-O), (II) SLA surface modified with Ti-Sr-O (SLA + Ti-Sr-O), and (III) SLActive surface (SLActive). Following a healing period of 2 weeks and 4 weeks, the pull-out (PO) force needed to detach the discs from the bone was assessed, as a surrogate of osseointegration.

Results: The SLActive surface exhibited statistically significant higher median PO forces, compared with the SLA + Ti-Sr-O surfaces at both 2- and 4 weeks post-op (p > .05). In this study, no single turned + Ti-Sr-O surface disk was integrated.

Conclusions: The tested Ti-Sr-O technology failed to enhance osseointegration; however, this finding may be related to the inappropriateness of the rabbit tibia plateau model for assessing third-generation implant surface technologies, due to the limited diffusion and clearance at the disk-bone interface.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
SLA, Strontium, osseointegration, preclinical in vivo
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64248 (URN)10.1002/cre2.812 (DOI)001113064700001 ()38044566 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85178470990 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-11 Created: 2023-12-11 Last updated: 2024-02-15Bibliographically approved
Figuero, E., Gursoy, M., Monnet-Corti, V., Iniesta, M., Antezack, A., Kapferer-Seebacher, I., . . . Sanz, M. (2024). Domains, competences and learning outcomes for undergraduate education in periodontology. Journal of Clinical Periodontology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Domains, competences and learning outcomes for undergraduate education in periodontology
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051XArticle in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Aim: This review is intended to adapt the current conceptual framework in dental education based on four domains to propose a set of competences, learning outcomes and methods of teaching, learning and assessment for undergraduate education in periodontology.

Review: Based on the current framework of competences and learning outcomes recommended by the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE), undergraduate education in periodontology has been updated using the classification and clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of periodontal and peri-implant diseases.

Conclusions: Specific learning outcomes have been proposed within each competence area, that is in Domain I (n = 10), Domain II (n = 13), Domain III (n = 33) and Domain IV (n = 12). Teaching methods and learning activities based on the different dimensions of the cognitive process have been proposed. Additionally, 10 key learning outcomes have been proposed as exit outcomes, which implies their accomplishment within the final assessment of any graduating student.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
curriculum, dental education, learning outcomes, periodontology, undergraduate
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-67305 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13991 (DOI)001207211400001 ()38655768 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85191327571 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-05-21 Created: 2024-05-21 Last updated: 2024-05-21Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Burisch, J., Pandis, N., Klinge, B. & Stavropoulos, A. (2024). Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study. Journal of Periodontology, 95(2), 159-174
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 159-174Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: To describe the frequency and impact of oral lesions and professional dental care costs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (i.e., Crohn disease [CD] or ulcerative colitis [UC]) compared to matched controls).

Methods: IBD patients and matched controls were surveyed on general anamnestic information, eating and drinking habits, and oral health- and dental care-related questions; IBD patients were additionally surveyed on oral lesions. Problems related to oral lesions and the amount of money spent for professional dental care in the past 12 months were defined as primary outcome parameters.

Results: Answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls were analyzed. About 30% of the patients indicated having had problems with oral lesions, with CD patients having 46% higher odds and having them more often in a generalized form compared to UC patients. Further, self-reported severe periodontitis increased the odds of having oral lesions by almost 2.3-times. However, only about 12.5% of IBD patients were informed by their physician about oral lesions and about 10% indicated receiving treatment for them. Compared to controls, IBD patients required more often dental treatment and spent more money; specifically, UC and CD patients had 27 and 89% higher odds, respectively, for having spent ≥3000 DKK (ca. 440 USD) at the dentist compared to controls.

Conclusions: IBD patients have more often oral health problems and higher expenses for professional dental care compared to matched controls. This included problems with IBD-related oral lesions, but these are rarely addressed by the medical or dental team.Keywords: Crohn disease; case-control studies; colitis; dental care; inflammatory bowel diseases; surveys and questionnaires; ulcerative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
case-control studies, colitis, Crohn disease, dental care, inflammatory bowel diseases, surveys and questionnaires, ulcerative
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-62487 (URN)10.1002/JPER.23-0325 (DOI)001046841400001 ()37469002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167700301 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-03-06Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Vlachou, S., Pandis, N., Zampelis, A. & Stavropoulos, A. (2024). Repeated local delivery of hyaluronic acid gel as adjunctive treatment of residual pockets in periodontitis patients undergoing supportive periodontal care. A randomized controlled clinical trial. Clinical Oral Investigations, 28(2), Article ID 158.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Repeated local delivery of hyaluronic acid gel as adjunctive treatment of residual pockets in periodontitis patients undergoing supportive periodontal care. A randomized controlled clinical trial
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2024 (English)In: Clinical Oral Investigations, ISSN 1432-6981, E-ISSN 1436-3771, Vol. 28, no 2, article id 158Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives To assess the effect of hyaluronic acid (HyA) application as adjunct to re-instrumentation of residual pockets in patients undergoing regular supportive periodontal care (SPC). Methods Chronic periodontitis patients (stage III and IV, grade B and C) with 4 interproximal residual pockets were randomly assigned to the test (HyA gel) or control (saline) group. After subgingival instrumentation, test or control substance was applied subgingivally, then daily supragingivally for 3 months, and if required a second time after subgingival re-instrumentation after 3 months. Clinical and patient reported outcome parameters were recorded every 3 months for 12 months. Pocket closure [probing pocket depth (PPD) <= 4mm with absence of bleeding on probing (BoP) at PPD = 4mm] was the main outcome parameter. Results Fifty-six patients (221 experimental sites) were analysed. Pocket closure was achieved in 56.8 and 46.6% of the experimental sites in the test and control group, respectively (p > 0.05), while median PPD and PPD distribution (< 5mm/5mm/ > 5mm) differed significantly between groups in favour of the test group, at 12 months. Further, significantly fewer sites in the HyA group required re-instrumentation at 3 months, and sites in the HyA group showed a tendency for lower odds to remain diseased compared to the control group (OR 0.48, 95%CI 0.22-1.06). The odds for a site to remain diseased after 12 months increased significantly in the presence of plaque (OR 7.94, 95%CI 4.12-15.28), but in general, decreased significantly over time (OR 0.48, 95%CI 0.28-0.81). Conclusion Re-instrumentation of residual pockets in SPC patients, per se, leads to a significant increase in pocket closure over time; this was impeded by poor plaque control. Repeated local application of HyA results in fewer sites requiring re-instrumentation and might slightly improve the rate of pocket closure. (clinicaltrials.gov registration nr. NCT04792541). Clinical relevance HyA gel is easy to apply, well accepted by patients, and may have some positive effect in terms of fewer sites requiring re-instrumentation at 3 months and higher pocket closure rate at 12 months.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Berlin/Heidelberg, 2024
Keywords
Adjunct treatment, Hyaluronic acid, Periodontitis, Pocket closure, Randomized controlled clinical trial, Supportive periodontal care
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66541 (URN)10.1007/s00784-024-05505-9 (DOI)001171496400001 ()38376596 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185492305 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-28 Created: 2024-03-28 Last updated: 2024-04-11Bibliographically approved
Madsen, G. R., Bertl, K., Pandis, N., Stavropoulos, A. & Burisch, J. (2024). The link between periodontitis and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease. Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, 18(Suppl 1), I788-I788, Article ID P378.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The link between periodontitis and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Crohn's & Colitis, ISSN 1873-9946, E-ISSN 1876-4479, Vol. 18, no Suppl 1, p. I788-I788, article id P378Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Other academic) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2024
National Category
Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66924 (URN)10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjad212.0508 (DOI)001189928900500 ()
Available from: 2024-04-26 Created: 2024-04-26 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Kogelnik, S. L., Kukla, E., Herrmann, H., Schneider, S., Altorjai, G. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). A survey on oral health-related standard of care for head and neck cancer patients in the EU. Oral Diseases
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A survey on oral health-related standard of care for head and neck cancer patients in the EU
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2023 (English)In: Oral Diseases, ISSN 1354-523X, E-ISSN 1601-0825Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Objective: To map oral health-related standard of care in the context of head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment across the European Union (EU).

Materials and Methods: Six hundred and ninety centers across the European Union were contacted. The questionnaire contained questions focusing on the team/department structure, HNC treatment planning routines, and assessment and handling of dental treatment needs prior to cancer treatment.

Results: Eighty-seven centers across the EU responded. Department structure and number of HNC patients treated per year varied widely and dental professionals are included as part of the team in about 25% of the centers. Standard of care, in terms of dental assessment and preventive dentistry routines, such as recording an orthopantomogram, offering dental treatment, and providing a radiation protection splint and splint for fluoride application, differed significantly among the European regions. Independent of the region, these aspects are positively affected if dental professionals are part of the interdisciplinary treatment team and if dental treatment is offered within the center.

Conclusion: Dental professionals are still only to a very limited extent included in interdisciplinary treatment planning teams of HNC patients. However, their inclusion and/or offering dental treatment within the same hospital/center appears to improve oral health-related standard of care.

Clinical Relevance: Inclusion of dental professionals in treatment planning teams of HNC patients appears to improve oral health-related standard of care within HNC treatment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
head and neck cancer, oral health, preventive dentistry, questionnaire
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61883 (URN)10.1111/odi.14685 (DOI)001032396700001 ()37466114 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165389009 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2023-08-16Bibliographically approved
de Waal, Y. C. M., Winning, L., Stavropoulos, A. & Polyzois, I. (2023). Efficacy of chemical approaches for implant surface decontamination in conjunction with sub-marginal instrumentation, in the non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis: A systematic review. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 50(S26), 212-223
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of chemical approaches for implant surface decontamination in conjunction with sub-marginal instrumentation, in the non-surgical treatment of peri-implantitis: A systematic review
2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no S26, p. 212-223Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To answer the following PICOS question: In adult patients with peri-implantitis, what is the efficacy of sub-marginal instrumentation combined with chemical surface decontamination in comparison with sub-marginal instrumentation with or without placebo, in terms of changes in probing depth (PD) and/or bleeding on probing, as reported in prospective randomized controlled trials, non-randomized controlled trials, or prospective cohort studies, with a minimum of 6-month "follow-up".

Materials and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Scopus, Ovid Medline, and The Cochrane Library of the Cochrane Collaboration (CENTRAL) for articles published until March 2022. Data addressing the primary and secondary outcomes were extracted.

Results: The search gave 2033 results of which 3 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Two studies investigated the use of anti-microbial photodynamic therapy as adjunct to sub-marginal instrumentation and the third study assessed the adjunctive use of a desiccant material. A meta-analysis was not deemed meaningful because of the large heterogeneity among the studies. All three studies showed favourable results in terms of PD reduction for chemical surface decontamination over control approaches, but were inconsistent or showed no differences for the other outcome variables.

Conclusions: Adjunctive chemical approaches for implant surface decontamination may offer an advantage over sub-marginal instrumentation alone, in terms of improved PD.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
decontamination, dental implant, peri-implantitis, systematic review, therapy
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56542 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13749 (DOI)000890295600001 ()36375830 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85142612719 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-12 Created: 2022-12-12 Last updated: 2023-10-18Bibliographically approved
Edlund Johansson, P., Bertl, K., Pandis, N. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, 9(1), 3-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools: A systematic review and meta-analysis
2023 (English)In: Clinical and Experimental Dental Research, E-ISSN 2057-4347, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 3-16Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objectives: To summarize the available evidence on the efficacy of power-driven interdental cleaning tools (PDICTs) as an adjunct to tooth brushing compared to tooth brushing alone or tooth brushing combined with any other non-PDICT in terms of interproximal plaque and gingival bleeding reduction in gingivitis patients. Material and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in three databases until March 20, 2022 with the following main eligibility criteria: (1) randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs) with (2) at least 28 days of follow-up in (3) gingivitis patients. Interproximal plaque and bleeding values were defined as the primary outcome variables and used for pair-wise meta-analyses. Results: Sixteen RCTs were identified including data from 1258 participants at the final evaluation. Eight studies each investigated the effect of either a liquid-based or mechanical PDICT; one of these studies tested additionally a combined liquid-based and mechanical PDICT. Tooth brushing combined with a liquid-based PDICT compared to tooth brushing alone did not result in better interproximal plaque values but in significantly lower interproximal bleeding values. Tooth brushing combined with either a liquid-based PDICT or with a mechanical PDICT compared to tooth brushing and flossing achieved comparable interproximal plaque and bleeding values. The majority of studies reporting on patient compliance/preference favored the use of a PDICT, and except for a single study, which was reporting soft tissue trauma in two subjects from improper use of a mechanical PDICT, none of the studies reported adverse events. Conclusions: Daily use of PDICT as an adjunct to tooth brushing significantly reduces interproximal bleeding. This effect appears comparable to that of flossing, while PDICT may achieve higher patient acceptance/compliance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
bleeding, gingivitis, interdental cleaning device, meta-analysis, plaque, systematic review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58416 (URN)10.1002/cre2.691 (DOI)000903044600001 ()36562267 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145093023 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-02-28 Created: 2023-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Stavropoulos, A., Marcantonio, C. C., de Oliveira, V. X., Marcantonio Jr, E. & de Oliveira, G. J. (2023). Fresh-frozen allogeneic bone blocks grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation: Biological and clinical aspects. Periodontology 2000, 93(1), 139-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Fresh-frozen allogeneic bone blocks grafts for alveolar ridge augmentation: Biological and clinical aspects
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2023 (English)In: Periodontology 2000, ISSN 0906-6713, E-ISSN 1600-0757, Vol. 93, no 1, p. 139-152Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The possibilities for oral bone regeneration procedures vary depending on the type of bone defect to be treated, which in turn dictate the type of graft to be used. Atrophic alveolar ridges are non-contained defects and pose a challenging defect morphology for bone regeneration/augmentation. Successful results are regularly obtained with the use of particulate grafts in combination with barrier membranes. In cases of very narrow ridges with need of larger amount of bone augmentation, block grafts are often used. Fresh-frozen allogeneic bone block grafts have been proposed as an alternative to autogenous (AT) bone blocks. Based on a systematic appraisal of pre-clinical in vivo studies and clinical trials including a direct comparison of fresh-frozen bone (FFB) blocks versus AT bone blocks it can be concluded that a FFB block graft: (a) cannot be considered as a reliable replacement of a AT bone block, and (b) should only be considered in cases where the amount of necessary augmentation-in a lateral direction-is relatively limited, so that the main portion of the body of the implant lies within the inner (i.e., the vital) aspect of the block.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
autogenous bone, block bone graft, fresh-frozen bone allograft
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66249 (URN)10.1111/prd.12543 (DOI)001138754700003 ()38194350 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85181974413 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-03-07 Created: 2024-03-07 Last updated: 2024-03-07Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-8161-3754

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