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Häggman-Henrikson, BirgittaORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6088-3739
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Publications (10 of 63) Show all publications
Häggman-Henrikson, B., Ali, D., Aljamal, M. & Chrcanovic, B. R. (2024). Bruxism and dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 202-217
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bruxism and dental implants: A systematic review and meta-analysis
2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 202-217Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Overload from bruxism may affect survival of dental implants.

Objectives: To evaluate implant failure and marginal bone loss (MBL) in patients presenting with probable bruxism compared to non-bruxers. The study was registered in PROSPERO (CRD42021238397).

Methods: An electronic search September 2022 in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science and Science Direct was combined with a hand search. Two independent reviewers carried out abstract screening, full-text assessment, quality assessment (National Institutes of Health tool) and data extraction. Only studies that provided information on self-report and clinical examination needed for the diagnosis of at least 'probable' bruxism were included. A pairwise random-effect meta-analysis was carried out.

Results: In total 1338 studies were identified, and after screening and full-text assessment 27 studies that presented data on 2105 implants in probable bruxers and 10 264 implants in non-bruxers were included, with 138 and 352 implant failures in respective groups. the meta-analysis showed that implants placed in probable bruxers had a higher risk of failure than in non-bruxers (OR 2.189; 95% CI 1.337, 3.583, p = .002). A meta-regression showed that follow-up time did not affect this OR. Eighteen studies provided general data on MBL but did not report results separated between bruxers and non-bruxers. Therefore, an analysis of MBL was not possible.

Conclusion: The results of the present systematic review show that implants placed in probable bruxers present a significantly higher risk of failure than implants placed in non-bruxers. This should be considered in treatment planning and management of implant patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
bruxism, dental implants, meta-analysis, survival, systematic review
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-62486 (URN)10.1111/joor.13567 (DOI)001048828200001 ()37589382 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85168284166 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Bracci, A., Lobbezoo, F., Colonna, A., Bender, S., Conti, P. C., Emodi-Perlman, A., . . . Manfredini, D. (2024). Research routes on awake bruxism metrics: implications of the updated bruxism definition and evaluation strategies.. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 150-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Research routes on awake bruxism metrics: implications of the updated bruxism definition and evaluation strategies.
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 150-161Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: In line with a similar recent proposal for sleep bruxism (SB), defining clinically oriented research routes to implement knowledge on awake bruxism (AB) metrics is important for an enhanced comprehension of the full bruxism spectrum, i.e. better assessment and more efficient management.

METHODS: We summarised current strategies for AB assessment and proposed a research route for improving its metrics.

RESULTS: Most of the literature focuses on bruxism in general or SB in particular, whilst knowledge on AB is generally fragmental. Assessment can be based on non-instrumental or instrumental approaches. The former include self-report (questionnaires, oral history) and clinical examination, whilst the latter include electromyography (EMG) of jaw muscles during wakefulness as well as the technology-enhanced ecological momentary assesment (EMA). Phenotyping of different AB activities should be the target of a research task force. In the absence of available data on the frequency and intensity of wake-time bruxism-type masticatory muscle activity, any speculation about the identification of thresholds and criteria to identify bruxers is premature. Research routes in the field must focus on the improvement of data reliability and validity.

CONCLUSIONS: Probing deeper into the study of AB metrics is a fundamental step to assist clinicians in preventing and managing the putative consequences at the individual level. The present manuscript proposes some possible research routes to advance current knowledge. At different levels, instrumentally-based and subject-based information must be gathered in a universally accepted standardized approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Assessment, Awake Bruxism, Bruxism, Evaluation, STAB
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61393 (URN)10.1111/joor.13514 (DOI)001009692600001 ()37191494 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162055444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-27 Created: 2023-06-27 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Stanisic, N., Do, C. T., Skarping, S., Chrcanovic, B. R., Bracci, A., Manfredini, D. & Häggman-Henrikson, B. (2024). Smartphone application to report awake bruxism: Development and testing of the Swedish version and a pilot study to evaluate family history in young adults and their parents. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 188-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Smartphone application to report awake bruxism: Development and testing of the Swedish version and a pilot study to evaluate family history in young adults and their parents
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 188-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Together with psychosocial and hereditary factors, bruxism is a pos-sible risk factor for orofacial pain. Bruxism is defined as a masticatory muscle activity characterized by repetitive or sustained tooth contact, or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible. A smartphone application to report awake bruxism (AB) has been de-veloped and translated into more than 25 languages.Objective(s): To translate the application into Swedish, adapt it to Swedish culture and conduct a study to evaluate the usability of the application for studies on family history and associated risk factors.Methods: Translation and cultural adaption of the Swedish version of the application (BruxApp) was carried out in a four-step sequential process. Ten young adults (22– 30 years) were recruited together with ten parents (42–67 years) and reported their AB with the application over two seven-day periods. Pain, stress and parafunctional behaviours were assessed by questionnaires.Results: The back translation check showed minimal discrepancies between the trans-lation and the English version. Participants did not report any problems with the ap-plication. Response rates for both groups were 65%. A difference in frequency of AB was shown between young adults and parents (22.0% vs. 12.5%, p< .001). A positive moderate correlation was found between AB and stress (r= 0.54, p= .017).Conclusion: The use of application strategies enables data collection on AB which can be used in both clinical and research settings. The results suggest that the Swedish version is ready for implementation and for studies on the relationships between AB, family history and psychosocial factors.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59692 (URN)10.1111/joor.13515 (DOI)000997692800001 ()37210658 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85161208444 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-27 Created: 2023-05-27 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Manfredini, D., Ahlberg, J., Aarab, G., Bender, S., Bracci, A., Cistulli, P. A., . . . Lobbezoo, F. (2024). Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 29-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 29-58Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This paper aims to present and describe the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB), an instrument that was developed to provide a multidimensional evaluation of bruxism status, comorbid conditions, aetiology and consequences.

Methods: The rationale for creating the tool and the road map that led to the selection of items included in the STAB has been discussed in previous publications.

Results: The tool consists of two axes, specifically dedicated to the evaluation of bruxism status and consequences (Axis A) and of bruxism risk and etiological factors and comorbid conditions (Axis B). The tool includes 14 domains, accounting for a total of 66 items. Axis A includes the self-reported information on bruxism status and possible consequences (subject-based report) together with the clinical (examiner report) and instrumental (technology report) assessment. The Subject-Based Assessment (SBA) includes domains on Sleep Bruxism (A1), Awake Bruxism (A2) and Patient's Complaints (A3), with information based on patients' self-report. The Clinically Based Assessment (CBA) includes domains on Joints and Muscles (A4), Intra- and Extra-Oral Tissues (A5) and Teeth and Restorations (A6), based on information collected by an examiner. The Instrumentally Based Assessment (IBA) includes domains on Sleep Bruxism (A7), Awake Bruxism (A8) and the use of Additional Instruments (A9), based on the information gathered with the use of technological devices. Axis B includes the self-reported information (subject-based report) on factors and conditions that may have an etiological or comorbid association with bruxism. It includes domains on Psychosocial Assessment (B1), Concurrent Sleep-related Conditions Assessment (B2), Concurrent Non-Sleep Conditions Assessment (B3), Prescribed Medications and Use of Substances Assessment (B4) and Additional Factors Assessment (B5). As a rule, whenever possible, existing instruments, either in full or partial form (i.e. specific subscales), are included. A user's guide for scoring the different items is also provided to ease administration.

Conclusions: The instrument is now ready for on-field testing and further refinement. It can be anticipated that it will help in collecting data on bruxism in such a comprehensive way to have an impact on several clinical and research fields.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
STAB, assessment, awake bruxism, bruxism, diagnosis, sleep bruxism.
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58481 (URN)10.1111/joor.13411 (DOI)000931474300001 ()36597658 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180535309 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-02 Created: 2023-03-02 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Manfredini, D., Ahlberg, J., Aarab, G., Bracci, A., Durham, J., Emodi-Perlman, A., . . . Lobbezoo, F. (2024). The development of the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB): An international road map.. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 51(1), 15-28
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The development of the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB): An international road map.
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 15-28Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper summarises the background reasoning and work that led to the selection of the items included in the Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism (STAB), also introducing the list of items. The instrument is currently being tested for face validity and on-field comprehension. The underlying premise is that the different motor activities included in the bruxism spectrum (e.g. clenching vs. grinding, with or without teeth contact) potentially need to be discriminated from each other, based on their purportedly different aetiology, comorbidities and potential consequences. Focus should be on a valid impression of the activities' frequency, intensity and duration. The methods that can be used for the above purposes can be grouped into strategies that collect information from the patient's history (subject-based), from the clinical assessment performed by an examiner (clinically based) or from the use of instruments to measure certain outcomes (instrumentally based). The three strategies can apply to all aspects of bruxism (i.e. status, comorbid conditions, aetiology and consequences). The STAB will help gathering information on many aspects, factors and conditions that are currently poorly investigated in the field of bruxism. To this purpose, it is divided into two axes. Axis A includes the self-reported information on bruxism status and potential consequences (subject-based report) together with the clinical (examiner report) and instrumental assessment (technology report). Axis B includes the self-reported information (subject-based report) on factors and conditions that may have an etiological or comorbid role for bruxism. This comprehensive multidimensional assessment system will allow building predictive model for clinical and research purposes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
Standardised Tool for the Assessment of Bruxism, assessment, awake bruxism, bruxism, sleep bruxism
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56099 (URN)10.1111/joor.13380 (DOI)000879617800001 ()36261916 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141499235 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-11-17 Created: 2022-11-17 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Sharma, S., Nilsson, P. M., Östergren, P.-O., Häggman-Henrikson, B., List, T. & Kallen, M. A. (2023). A new instrument for assessing work-related body mechanics and strain in the general population. Journal of Pain, 24(2), 237-250, Article ID S1526-5900(22)00409-6.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A new instrument for assessing work-related body mechanics and strain in the general population
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Pain, ISSN 1526-5900, E-ISSN 1528-8447, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 237-250, article id S1526-5900(22)00409-6Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Clinical pain is often linked to poor body mechanics, with individuals sometimes presenting multiple painful disorders. Such disorders may be influenced by behaviors that affect the general resiliency and health of the musculoskeletal system. We aimed to develop a self-reported scale using the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study questions on work-related body mechanical exposures. An expert panel identified 41 variables having content validity for musculoskeletal problems. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on a random selection of 50% of the cohort (n=6,789 adults); the remaining was reserved for confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), item response theory (IRT) item calibration, and differential item functioning investigations. Supported by standard measure development methods and fit criteria, the final unidimensional item bank contains 13 items. Overall CFA statistics (root mean square error of approximation=0.09; comparative fit index=0.96; Tucker-Lewis index=0.96; standardized root mean residuals=0.05) indicated excellent single-factor model fit and appropriateness of IRT modeling and calibration. Expert review and item information values (score-precision) guided selection of an 8-item short form with acceptable score-level reliabilities (≥0.70) for T-scores=39-80+. This measure provides reliable assessment of body mechanics strain in adults and can be useful when evaluating different contributions to musculoskeletal problems affecting pain-treatment success in future clinical research. Perspective: This article presents the development and psychometric properties of a new measure, "Work-related Body Mechanics and Strain Scale (WR-BMSS)." The scale has 13-items or alternatively an 8-item short form. This measure could potentially help clinicians who seek to assess how musculoskeletal problems may contribute to patient pain and disability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Body mechanics, factor analysis, psychometrics, strain, work-place limitation
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-55423 (URN)10.1016/j.jpain.2022.09.011 (DOI)000969412300001 ()36216127 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143487167 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-10-18 Created: 2022-10-18 Last updated: 2023-12-13Bibliographically approved
Lövgren, A., Ilgunas, A., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Elias, B., AL Roudini, O., Visscher, C. M., . . . Liv, P. (2023). Associations between screening for functional jaw disturbances and patient reported outcomes on jaw limitations and oral behaviors. Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, 23(3), Article ID 101888.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between screening for functional jaw disturbances and patient reported outcomes on jaw limitations and oral behaviors
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Evidence-Based Dental Practice, ISSN 1532-3382, E-ISSN 1532-3390, Vol. 23, no 3, article id 101888Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ObjectivesTemporomandibular disorders (TMDs) is a collective term for pain and functional disturbances related to the jaw muscles and the temporomandibular joint. In contrast to screening for orofacial pain, knowledge is limited on the association between patient-reported outcomes and screening for joint-related functional jaw disturbances. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the association between a screening question for functional jaw disturbances, and disease-specific out-come measures for functional jaw limitations and oral behaviors.MethodsThis study included 299 individuals (201 women; 20-69 years, median 37.0) in a general population sample from Vasterbotten, Northern Sweden in 2014. A single screening question for functional jaw disturbances "Does your jaw lock or become stuck once a week or more?" was used to categorize individuals as cases or controls. Patient-reported outcomes on functional jaw disturbances were assessed with the 20-item jaw functional limitation scale (JFLS-20) and oral behaviors with the 21-item Oral Behaviors Checklist (OBC-21).ResultsThe strongest predictive probability to have a positive screening outcome was functional jaw limitations related to mobility (AUC(boot) = 0.78, 95 CI:0.71-0.86, P < .001), followed by limitations related to communication (AUC(boot) = 0.74, 95 CI:0.63-0.80, P < .001) and mastication (AUC(boot) = 0.73, 95 CI:0.66-0.81, P < .001). The frequency of oral behaviors was not significantly associated with a positive screening outcome (AUC(boot) = 0.65, 95 CI:0.55-0.72, P = .223).ConclusionsSelf-reported functional limitations, but not oral behaviors, are strongly associated with a single screening question for frequent functional jaw disturbances. This finding provides support for incorporating a question on jaw catching/locking once a week or more in screening instruments for TMDs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
General practice, Dental, Clinical decision-making, Screening, Temporomandibular joint disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63598 (URN)10.1016/j.jebdp.2023.101888 (DOI)001075753100001 ()37689443 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166922410 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-10 Created: 2023-11-10 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Böthun, A., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Stålnacke, B.-M., Wänman, A., Nordh, E., Lampa, E. & Hellström, F. (2023). Clinical Signs in the Jaw and Neck Region Following Whiplash Trauma - a 2-year follow-up. European Journal of Pain, 27(6), 699-709
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Signs in the Jaw and Neck Region Following Whiplash Trauma - a 2-year follow-up
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2023 (English)In: European Journal of Pain, ISSN 1090-3801, E-ISSN 1532-2149, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 699-709Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Pain in the orofacial region is often reported after whiplash trauma. However, prospective studies evaluating clinical signs related to orofacial pain and disability in whiplash populations are rare. The aim of the present study was to evaluate clinical signs related to pain and dysfunction in orofacial and neck regions after whiplash trauma, in a short- and long-term perspective.

METHODS: In total, 84 cases (48 women) diagnosed with neck distortion after a car accident and 116 controls (68 women) were examined within one month, and 49 cases (27 women) and 71 controls (41 women) were reexamined two years later. Outcome measures were pain on palpation of jaw and neck muscles and maximal jaw opening. Analysis was performed using mixed-models.

RESULTS: Cases and women were at higher risk for pain on palpation of jaw muscles (OR:7.7;P<0.001 and OR:3.2;P=0.010, respectively) and neck muscles (OR:12.7;P<0.001 and OR:2.9;P=0.020, respectively) but with no significant effect of time. Cases and women also had lower maximal jaw opening (-3.1;P=0.001 and -3.3;P=0.001, respectively). There was no significant time effect, but a significant interaction between cases and time (2.2;P=0.004).

CONCLUSION: Individuals with a whiplash trauma present a higher risk for pain on palpation in jaw and neck muscles both in a short- and long-term perspective, but show normal jaw movements. No time effect suggest that cases do not spontaneously improve nor get worse. Investigating pain on palpation in the jaw and neck muscles after whiplash trauma can identify individuals at risk for developing long-term orofacial pain and dysfunction.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-58471 (URN)10.1002/ejp.2099 (DOI)000945366500001 ()36806817 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85150413156 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-03-01 Created: 2023-03-01 Last updated: 2023-08-18Bibliographically approved
Durham, J., Ohrbach, R., Baad‐Hansen, L., Davies, S., De Laat, A., Goncalves, D. G., . . . Alstergren, P. (2023). Constructing the brief diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (bDC/TMD) for field testing. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Constructing the brief diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (bDC/TMD) for field testing
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Despite advances in temporomandibular disorders' (TMDs) diagnosis, the diagnostic process continues to be problematic in non-specialist settings.

Objective: To complete a Delphi process to shorten the Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) to a brief DC/TMD (bDC/TMD) for expedient clinical diagnosis and initial management.

Methods: An international Delphi panel was created with 23 clinicians representing major specialities, general dentistry and related fields. The process comprised a full day workshop, seven virtual meetings, six rounds of electronic discussion and finally an open consultation at a virtual international symposium.

Results: Within the physical axis (Axis 1), the self-report Symptom Questionnaire of the DC/TMD did not require shortening from 14 items for the bDC/TMD. The compulsory use of the TMD pain screener was removed reducing the total number of Axis 1 items by 18%. The DC/TMD Axis 1 10-section examination protocol (25 movements, up to 12 sets of bilateral palpations) was reduced to four sections in the bDC/TMD protocol involving three movements and three sets of palpations. Axis I then resulted in two groups of diagnoses: painful TMD (inclusive of secondary headache), and common joint-related TMD with functional implications. The psychosocial axis (Axis 2) was shortened to an ultra-brief 11 item assessment.

Conclusion: The bDC/TMD represents a substantially reduced and likely expedited method to establish (grouping) diagnoses in TMDs. This may provide greater utility for settings requiring less granular diagnoses for the implementation of initial treatment, for example non-specialist general dental practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
facial pain, temporomandibular disorders, temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular joint disorders, temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64863 (URN)10.1111/joor.13652 (DOI)001136362000001 ()38151896 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180920007 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2024-01-08 Created: 2024-01-08 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Nilsson, E., Häggman-Henrikson, B., Domellöf, E., Hellström, F., Häger, C. K. & Österlund, C. (2023). Development of integrated jaw-neck motor function in children at 6, 10 and 13 years of age compared to adults: A kinematic longitudinal study. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 50(10), 1002-1011
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Development of integrated jaw-neck motor function in children at 6, 10 and 13 years of age compared to adults: A kinematic longitudinal study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 1002-1011Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BackgroundThe functional integration of the jaw and neck motor systems, of great importance to everyday oral activities, is established in early childhood. Detailed characterisation of this developmental progress is largely unknown. ObjectiveTo establish developmental changes in jaw-neck motor function in children over the ages 6-13 years compared to adults. MethodsJaw and head movement kinematics during jaw opening-closing and chewing were longitudinally recorded in 20 Swedish children (8 girls) at 6 (6.3 & PLUSMN; 0.4), 10 (10.3 & PLUSMN; 0.3) and 13 (13.5 & PLUSMN; 0.7) years of age and 20 adults (9 women, 28.2 & PLUSMN; 6.7). Movement amplitudes, jaw movement cycle time (CT), coefficient of variation (CV) and head/jaw ratio for amplitudes were analysed. Linear mixed effect analysis and Welch's t-test were used. ResultsChildren showed pronounced movement variability and longer CT at 6 and 10 years old during opening and chewing (p < .001). Compared to adults, 6-year-olds showed higher head/jaw ratios (p < .02) and longer CT (p < .001) during opening and chewing, and higher CV-head (p < .001) during chewing. Whereas 10-year-olds showed larger jaw and head amplitudes (p < .02) and longer CT (p < .001) during opening, and longer CT (p < .001) and higher CV-head (p < .001) during chewing. For 13-year-olds, longer CT (p < .001) during chewing was found. ConclusionChildren showed pronounced movement variability and longer movement cycle time at 6-10 years and developmental progress in jaw-neck integration from 6 to 13 years, with 13-year-olds displaying adult-like movements. These results add new detailed understanding to the typical development of integrated jaw-neck motor function.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
adult, child, head, jaw, motor activity, movement
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61922 (URN)10.1111/joor.13539 (DOI)001014595400001 ()37323062 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85162668468 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Projects
Malmö Offspring Pain Study - MOPS
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6088-3739

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