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Åkerman, Sigvard
Publications (10 of 34) Show all publications
Franzon, B., Moutakis, M., Axtelius, B., Åkerman, S. & Klinge, B. (2024). The relationship between practice ownership and follow-up of comprehensive dental care. A Swedish register study.. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 83, 151-159
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The relationship between practice ownership and follow-up of comprehensive dental care. A Swedish register study.
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2024 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 83, p. 151-159Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The aims of this register study were:

  1. To study whether the type of ownership of the dental practice was correlated with the type of dental care provided, that is public versus private ownership and professional (dentist or dental hygienist) versus non-professional ownership.
  2. To study the extent of follow-up of patients who have undergone two types of treatments. 

MATERIAL & METHODS: Two types of dental care were defined in the two groups studied, periodontitis/peri-implantitis and comprehensive restorative/rehabilitation. All relevant treatment codes that fall under these definitions are noted when they are performed. Also, the follow-up of each treatment code is noted. Differences in dental and socioeconomic status over time and between regions were adjusted for. A drop-out analysis was performed.  Results: Dental practices owned by dentists or dental hygienists schedule follow-up appointments for patients who have undergone comprehensive restorative or rehabilitation dentistry more often than practices with other types of ownership. Dental practices owned by dentists or dental hygienists follow up patients with periodontitis and peri-implantitis less frequently.

CONCLUSION: Type of ownership of a dental business influences the extent to which periodontal, and comprehensive restorative or rehabilitation dentistry were followed up.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Medical Journals Sweden, 2024
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-66940 (URN)10.2340/aos.v83.40277 (DOI)38623771 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2024-04-26 Created: 2024-04-26 Last updated: 2024-04-26Bibliographically approved
Silbereisen, A., Lira-Junior, R., Åkerman, S., Klinge, B., Boström, E. A. & Bostanci, N. (2023). Association of salivary TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 inflammatory markers with non-communicable diseases.. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 50(11), 1467-1475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of salivary TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 inflammatory markers with non-communicable diseases.
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1467-1475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) and peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1) are elevated in biofluids in the presence of various inflammatory conditions. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the effect of age, sex, smoking and different oral and systemic non-communicable diseases on the levels of TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 in saliva.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 445 individuals (mean age 48.7 ± 16.9 years, female:male 51%:49%) were included. All provided self-reported information on smoking and systemic diseases and whole stimulated saliva. Periodontal and cariological parameters were recorded. Salivary levels of TREM-1, PGLYRP1 and total protein were measured using commercially available assays.

RESULTS: Salivary TREM-1 levels were significantly higher in stages III-IV periodontitis compared to other periodontal diagnoses (p < .05). Smoking, bleeding on probing (BOP), percentage of pockets ≥4 mm and the number of manifest caries were associated with TREM-1 (p < .05), while sex, BOP, number of manifest caries and muscle and joint diseases were associated with PGLYRP1 (p < .05).

CONCLUSIONS: Salivary TREM-1 is associated with periodontitis and caries, while PGLYRP1 is associated with gingival inflammation and caries. Additionally, TREM-1 levels are modified by smoking, while PGLYRP1 is modified by sex and muscle and joint diseases. TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 in saliva could serve as potential biomarkers for detecting and monitoring non-communicable diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
PGLYRP1, TREM-1, caries, non-communicable diseases, periodontal disease
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61999 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13858 (DOI)001040681500001 ()37524498 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166417202 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Shmarina, E., Ericson, D., Åkerman, S. & Axtelius, B. (2022). Exploring salutogenic factors supporting oral health in the elderly. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 80(4), 241-251
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring salutogenic factors supporting oral health in the elderly
2022 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 80, no 4, p. 241-251Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim To explore associations between salutogenic factors and selected clinical outcome variables of oral health in the elderly, combining Antonovsky's salutogenic theory and the Lalonde Health Field concept. Methods The subjects comprised 146 individuals, aged 60 years and older, who had participated in a population-based epidemiological study in Sweden, 2011-2012, using questionnaire and oral examination data. A cross-sectional analysis used the selected outcome variables, such as number of remaining teeth, DMFT-index and risk assessment, and salutogenic factors from the questionnaire, clustered into domains and health fields, as artifactual-material, cognitive-emotional and valuative-attitudinal. This selection was based on findings from our previous analysis using a framework cross-tabulating two health models. The purpose was to facilitate analysis of associations not previously addressed in the literature on oral health. Bivariate and Multiple Linear Regression analyses were used. Results Numerous salutogenic factors were identified. Significant associations between outcome variables and salutogenic factors previously unreported could be added. Regression analysis identified three contributing independent factors for 'low DMFT'. Conclusions This study supports the usefulness of a salutogenic approach for analysing oral health outcomes, identifying university education, the importance of dental health organization recall system and close social network, as important salutogenic factors. The large number of salutogenic factors found supporting oral health among the elderly indicates the complexity of salutogenesis and the need for robust analysing tools. Combining two current health models was considered useful for exploring these covariations. These findings have implications for future investigations, identifying important research questions to be explored in qualitative analyses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Oral health, salutogenesis, observational study, social determinants of health, elderly
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-46767 (URN)10.1080/00016357.2021.1990995 (DOI)000710378500001 ()34693858 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85118111543 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-11-09 Created: 2021-11-09 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Sharma, S., Lövgren, A., Åkerman, S., Nilsson, P. M., Axtelius, B., List, T. & Häggman-Henrikson, B. (2021). Prevalence of Facial Pain and Headache in Sweden. The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, 35(2), 139-+
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prevalence of Facial Pain and Headache in Sweden
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2021 (English)In: The Journal of Oral & Facial Pain and Headache, ISSN 2333-0384 , E-ISSN 2333-0376 , Vol. 35, no 2, p. 139-+Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims: To compare the prevalence of facial pain and headache across various regions in Sweden. Methods: This study involved a comparison of cross-sectional questionnaire studies over a period of 10 years including 128,193 individuals and assessed facial pain, pain on function, and headache. Participants included (1) all Public Dental Service patients aged 16 to 90 years in Vasterbotten (n = 57,283) and Gavleborg (n = 60,900); and (2) random samples of residents in Kalmar (n = 3,560) and Skane (n = 6,450). Facial pain and pain on function were assessed for all participants, and headache was also assessed for participants in Kalmar and Skane. Descriptive statistics were used to estimate unadjusted prevalence estimates and demographic characteristics. Prevalence estimates were adjusted for age and sex using weighted distributions from the 2015 data in the Swedish population registry before comparisons across the regions. Results: Overall, the prevalence of facial pain and headache were significantly higher in female than in male participants (P<.01). The standardized prevalence of facial pain was 4.9% in Vasterbotten, 1.4% in Gavleborg, 4.6% in Kalmar, and 7.6% in Skane. For headache, the standardized prevalence was 18.9% in Kalmar and 21.3% in Skane. In Skane, individuals with facial pain had a 15-fold higher odds of headache than those without. Conclusion: In the present Swedish epidemiologic study, the prevalence of facial pain ranged from 1.4% in Gavleborg to 7.6% in Skane. Besides different sampling frames and other population characteristics, the presence of a high number of immigrants in Skane may account for some differences in pain prevalence across the Swedish regions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence, 2021
Keywords
facial pain, headache, prevalence, survey, temporomandibular disorders
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-44588 (URN)10.11607/ofph.2645 (DOI)000661872600007 ()34129659 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85108247703 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-07-07 Created: 2021-07-07 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Shmarina, E., Ericson, D., Åkerman, S. & Axtelius, B. (2021). Salutogenic factors for oral health among older people: an integrative review connecting the theoretical frameworks of Antonovsky and Lalonde. Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 79(3), 218-231
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Salutogenic factors for oral health among older people: an integrative review connecting the theoretical frameworks of Antonovsky and Lalonde
2021 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 79, no 3, p. 218-231Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective The aim of this integrative review was to describe salutogenic factors associated with oral health outcomes in older people, from the theoretical perspectives of Antonovsky and Lalonde. Material and methods This study was based on a primary selection of 10,016 articles. To organize reported salutogenic factors, the Lalonde health field concept and Antonovsky's salutogenic theory were cross tabulated. Results The final analysis was based on 58 studies. The following oral health outcome variables were reported: remaining teeth, caries, periodontal disease, oral function and oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL). We could identify 77 salutogenic factors for oral health and OHRQoL. Salutogenic factors were identified primarily within the fields of Human Biology (such as 'higher saliva flow', 'BMI < 30 kg/m(2)' and 'higher cognitive ability at age 11'), Lifestyle (such as 'higher education level', 'social network diversity' and 'optimal oral health behaviour') and Environment (such as 'lower income inequality', 'public water fluoridation' and 'higher neighbourhood education level'). In the age group 60 years and over, there was a lack of studies with specific reference to salutogenic factors. Conclusions The results provide an overview of salutogenic factors for oral health from two theoretical perspectives. The method allowed concomitant disclosure of both theoretical perspectives and examination of their congruence. Further hypothesis-driven research is needed to understand how elderly people can best maintain good oral health.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
Keywords
Health field concept, oral health, oral health-related quality of life, salutogenesis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-41095 (URN)10.1080/00016357.2020.1849790 (DOI)000619032000001 ()33596156 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85101048255 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-03-09 Created: 2021-03-09 Last updated: 2024-02-08Bibliographically approved
Lira-Junior, R., Holmström, S. B., Clark, R., Zwicker, S., Majster, M., Johannsen, G., . . . Boström, E. A. (2020). S100A12 Expression Is Modulated During Monocyte Differentiation and Reflects Periodontitis Severity. Frontiers in Immunology, 11, Article ID 86.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>S100A12 Expression Is Modulated During Monocyte Differentiation and Reflects Periodontitis Severity
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2020 (English)In: Frontiers in Immunology, E-ISSN 1664-3224, Vol. 11, article id 86Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

S100A12 is a calcium-binding protein of the S100 subfamily of myeloid-related proteins that acts as an alarmin to induce a pro-inflammatory innate immune response. It has been linked to several chronic inflammatory diseases, however its role in the common oral immunopathology periodontitis is largely unknown. Previous in vitro monoculture experiments indicate that S100A12 production decreases during monocyte differentiation stages, while the regulation within tissue is poorly defined. This study evaluated S100A12 expression in monocyte subsets, during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation and following polarization, both in monoculture and in a tissue context, utilizing a three-dimensional co-culture oral tissue model. Further, we explored the involvement of S100A12 in periodontitis by analyzing its expression in peripheral circulation and gingival tissue, as well as in saliva. We found that S100A12 expression was higher in classical than in non-classical monocytes. S100A12 expression and protein secretion declined significantly during monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation, while polarization of monocyte-derived macrophages had no effect on either. Peripheral monocytes from periodontitis patients had higher S100A12 expression than monocytes from controls, a difference particularly observed in the intermediate and non-classical monocyte subsets. Further, monocytes from periodontitis patients displayed an increased secretion of S100A12 compared with monocytes from controls. In oral tissue cultures, monocyte differentiation resulted in increased S100A12 secretion over time, which further increased after inflammatory stimuli. Likewise, S100A12 expression was higher in gingival tissue from periodontitis patients where monocyte-derived cells exhibited higher expression of S100A12 in comparison to non-periodontitis tissue. In line with our findings, patients with severe periodontitis had significantly higher levels of S100A12 in saliva compared to non-periodontitis patients, and the levels correlated to clinical periodontal parameters. Taken together, S100A12 is predominantly secreted by monocytes rather than by monocyte-derived cells. Moreover, S100A12 is increased in inflamed tissue cultures, potentially as a result of enhanced production by monocyte-derived cells. This study implicates the involvement of S100A12 in periodontitis pathogenesis, as evidenced by increased S100A12 expression in inflamed gingival tissue, which may be due to altered circulatory monocytes in periodontitis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2020
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-13820 (URN)10.3389/fimmu.2020.00086 (DOI)000512767600001 ()32082330 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85079500771 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-19 Created: 2020-03-19 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Gillborg, S., Åkerman, S. & Ekberg, E. (2020). Tooth wear in Swedish adults: A cross-sectional study. Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 47(2), 235-245
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Tooth wear in Swedish adults: A cross-sectional study
2020 (English)In: Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, E-ISSN 1365-2842, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 235-245Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Tooth wear has been recognised as a growing oral health problem in children and adolescents, with erosion often cited as the main cause of the tooth wear. Most studies on tooth wear have been conducted on children and adolescents, and only few studies focus on adults. Our aim was to study the prevalence of different types of tooth wear in an adult population and investigate related factors to tooth wear.

METHODS: A total of 831 adults in Sweden participated in the study by completing a questionnaire about oral health, a clinical examination, saliva sample and intraoral photographs. Tooth wear was estimated according to the Basic Erosive Wear Examination index, and the aetiology was determined based on the clinical appearance.

RESULTS: Almost 80% of the individuals had signs of erosion, and over 90% had signs of attrition. A high level of tooth wear was found in 4.6% of the individuals, few of who reported having received information about both attrition and erosion. Significantly, more men had tooth wear. Daily consumption of fruit had a stronger correlation to tooth wear than acidic drinks.

DISCUSSION & CONCLUSION: A high level of tooth wear was found in 4.6% of the individuals, and it was more common in men than women. Aside from attrition, tooth wear due to erosion was a frequent finding in adults. Only a few of the individuals with a high level of tooth wear reported to have received information about tooth wear from their dentist or dental hygienist.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
adult, cross-sectional studies, epidemiologic factors, prevalence, tooth attrition, tooth erosion, tooth wear
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14286 (URN)10.1111/joor.12887 (DOI)000491013000001 ()31520545 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85074350555 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Björnfot Holmström, S., Lira-Junior, R., Zwicker, S., Majster, M., Gustafsson, A., Åkerman, S., . . . Boström, E. A. (2019). MMP-12 and S100s in saliva reflect different aspects of periodontal inflammation (ed.). Cytokine, 113, 155-161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>MMP-12 and S100s in saliva reflect different aspects of periodontal inflammation
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2019 (English)In: Cytokine, ISSN 1043-4666, E-ISSN 1096-0023, Vol. 113, p. 155-161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12, S100A8/A9, and S100A12 are involved in innate immune responses. We addressed whether different aspects of oral health and non-disease-related covariates influence their levels in saliva. 436 participants were clinically examined, completed a health questionnaire, and provided stimulated saliva. Salivary levels of MMP-12, S100A8/A9, and S100A12 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Lower MMP-12 levels were observed in individuals 40-64years old (yo) compared to < 40yo, and higher S100A8/A9 levels were found in individuals > 64yo compared to 40-64yo. Smokers exhibited lower MMP-12 and S100A12 levels compared to non-smokers. All three proteins were elevated in individuals with bleeding on probing (BOP)>20% compared to those with BOP</=20%, and the S100A8/A9 levels were higher in individuals having >/= 10% gingival pocket depths (PPD)>/=4mm compared to the ones with shallow pockets < 4mm. The extent of alveolar bone loss or presence of manifest caries did not alter any of the markers. MMP-12, S100A8/A9, and S100A12 levels were higher in participants with high periodontal inflammatory burden. All three proteins correlated positively to BOP, PPD, and to several inflammatory mediators. The explanatory variables for MMP-12 in saliva were age, smoking, presence of any tumor, and percentage of PPD>/=4mm. The determinant of salivary S100A8/A9 was percentage of BOP, while S100A12 levels were associated with percentage of BOP and presence of any tumor. Taken together, MMP-12 and the S100/calgranulin levels in saliva reflect different aspects of periodontal inflammation. Smoking and age should be taken into account in further investigation of these proteins as biomarker candidates of periodontal disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Academic Press, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-5729 (URN)10.1016/j.cyto.2018.06.036 (DOI)000454753700018 ()29983358 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85049443348 (Scopus ID)26651 (Local ID)26651 (Archive number)26651 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Lundegren, N., Sohrabi, M. M., Thoren, M. M. & Åkerman, S. (2019). Prosthetic dental restorations in Swedish samples: prevalence and agreement between self-report, clinical findings, and influence on quality of life (ed.). Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, 77(4), 296-302
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prosthetic dental restorations in Swedish samples: prevalence and agreement between self-report, clinical findings, and influence on quality of life
2019 (English)In: Acta Odontologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6357, E-ISSN 1502-3850, Vol. 77, no 4, p. 296-302Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Objective: To determine the prevalence of dental prosthetic restorations in an adult population, to study the agreement between self-reports and clinical findings of prosthetic restorations, and to study answers from a questionnaire in relation to the prevalence of prosthetic restorations. Material and methods: A questionnaire was sent to a sample of 10,000 adults. A further sample of 1000 individuals was invited to answer the questionnaire and also participate in a clinical study. The agreement between self-report and clinical findings was analyzed, as were the associations between prosthetic restorations and questionnaire responses, using the chi(2) test. Results: A total of 40% of the sample had fixed dental prostheses (FDP), 2.7% had removable dentures. The agreement between self-report and clinical findings was 93%. 34.7% of the individuals with no prosthetic restorations were university graduates and 4% of individuals with removable complete dentures. Oral health had the greatest impact on the quality of life of younger individuals with FDP, with an OHIP-14 (Oral Health Impact Profile) score of 7.3 for the age group 20-39 years compared to 4.9 for the age group 65-89 years. Conclusion: The questionnaire method can be a cost-effective way to determine the prevalence of prosthetic restorations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
Keywords
Self-assessment, quality of life, agreement, fixed partial dentures, removable dentures
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-6465 (URN)10.1080/00016357.2018.1542505 (DOI)000465152500009 ()30600743 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85059593042 (Scopus ID)30149 (Local ID)30149 (Archive number)30149 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Grant, M., Kilsgård, O., Åkerman, S., Klinge, B., Demmer, R. T., Malmström, J. & Jönsson, D. (2019). The Human Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide Profile according to the Oral Microbiota in Health, Periodontitis and Smoking. (ed.). Journal of Innate Immunity, 11(5), 432-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Human Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide Profile according to the Oral Microbiota in Health, Periodontitis and Smoking.
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Innate Immunity, ISSN 1662-811X, E-ISSN 1662-8128, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 432-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a diverse family of peptides that defend the mucosal surfaces of the oral cavity and other locations. Many AMPs have multiple functions and properties that influence aspects of innate defense and colonization by microorganisms. The human oral cavity is home to the second-most diverse microbiome, and the health of the mouth is influenced by the presence of these bacteria as well as by extrinsic factors such as periodontitis and smoking. This study hypothesized that the AMP profile is different in the presence of extrinsic factors and that this would also be reflected in the bacteria present. The AMP profile was analyzed by quantitative selected-reaction-monitoring mass spectrometry analysis and 40 bacterial species were quantified by DNA-DNA hybridization in saliva donated by 41 individuals. Periodontal status was assessed through dental examination and smoking status through medical charting. Periodontal health (in nonsmokers) was associated with a higher abundance of ribonuclease 7, protachykinin 1, β-defensin 128, lipocalin 1, bactericidal permeability-increasing protein fold-containing family B member 3, and bone-marrow proteoglycan. Nonsmoking periodontal disease was associated with an abundance of neutrophil defensin 1 and cathelicidin. However, 7 AMPs were overabundant in periodontal disease in smokers: adrenomedullin, eosinophil peroxidase, 3 different histones, myeloperoxidase, and neutrophil defensin 1. There were no differentially abundant AMPs in smokers versus nonsmokers with periodontal health. Correlation network inference of healthy nonsmokers, healthy smokers, nonsmoking periodontitis, or smoking periodontitis donors demonstrated very different networks growing in complexity with increasing numbers of stressors. The study highlights the importance of the interaction between the oral cavity and its resident microbiota and how this may be influenced by periodontal disease and smoking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
S. Karger, 2019
Keywords
Antimicrobial peptides, Inflammation, Periodontitis, Saliva
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-6563 (URN)10.1159/000494146 (DOI)000475307600005 ()30485856 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85057710646 (Scopus ID)27881 (Local ID)27881 (Archive number)27881 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
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