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Rosland, A., Bertelsen, R. J., Bunaes, D. F., Drengenes, C., Engström, G., Klinge, B., . . . Malinovschi, A. (2024). Periodontitis is associated with airflow obstruction in the Malmö Offspring Dental Study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 51(1), 86-96
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periodontitis is associated with airflow obstruction in the Malmö Offspring Dental Study
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 86-96Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: To investigate the association between periodontitis and lung function in the Malmo Offspring Dental Study.Materials and Methods: In all 1001 individuals (49.9% female, mean age: 44.6) from Malmo Offspring Dental Study were included. Periodontitis was assessed by a full-mouth examination protocol including bleeding on probing and classified according to the American Academy of Periodontology/Center for Disease Control definitions. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were expressed as absolute values and %predicted according to Global Lung Function Initiative reference values. FEV1, FVC and FEV1/FVC were analysed in relation to periodontal status using linear regression.Results:Severe periodontitis was found in 7% of the population. Adjusted regression models showed significant associations between lung function and severe periodontitis with 2.1 unit lower FEV1/FVC ratio (95% CI: -3.91, -0.23) and odds ratio (adjusted) of 2.56 (95% CI: 1.40, 4.75, p = .003) for airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal) if having severe periodontitis. Lower values of %predicted FEV1 and %predicted FVC, but not FEV1/FVC, were found in individuals with >25% bleeding on probing.Conclusions: Severe periodontitis was associated with lower FEV1/FVC ratio and airflow obstruction in the present cohort. More large-scale prospective studies and intervention studies are required for a comprehensive evaluation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2024
Keywords
lung function, Malmo Offspring Dental Study, periodontal disease, periodontitis, pulmonary function
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63461 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13886 (DOI)001086539000001 ()37837290 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85174186618 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-11-06 Created: 2023-11-06 Last updated: 2024-01-05Bibliographically approved
Silbereisen, A., Lira-Junior, R., Åkerman, S., Klinge, B., Boström, E. A. & Bostanci, N. (2023). Association of salivary TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 inflammatory markers with non-communicable diseases.. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 50(11), 1467-1475
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Association of salivary TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 inflammatory markers with non-communicable diseases.
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 1467-1475Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 1 (TREM-1) and peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP1) are elevated in biofluids in the presence of various inflammatory conditions. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the effect of age, sex, smoking and different oral and systemic non-communicable diseases on the levels of TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 in saliva.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: In total, 445 individuals (mean age 48.7 ± 16.9 years, female:male 51%:49%) were included. All provided self-reported information on smoking and systemic diseases and whole stimulated saliva. Periodontal and cariological parameters were recorded. Salivary levels of TREM-1, PGLYRP1 and total protein were measured using commercially available assays.

RESULTS: Salivary TREM-1 levels were significantly higher in stages III-IV periodontitis compared to other periodontal diagnoses (p < .05). Smoking, bleeding on probing (BOP), percentage of pockets ≥4 mm and the number of manifest caries were associated with TREM-1 (p < .05), while sex, BOP, number of manifest caries and muscle and joint diseases were associated with PGLYRP1 (p < .05).

CONCLUSIONS: Salivary TREM-1 is associated with periodontitis and caries, while PGLYRP1 is associated with gingival inflammation and caries. Additionally, TREM-1 levels are modified by smoking, while PGLYRP1 is modified by sex and muscle and joint diseases. TREM-1 and PGLYRP1 in saliva could serve as potential biomarkers for detecting and monitoring non-communicable diseases.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
PGLYRP1, TREM-1, caries, non-communicable diseases, periodontal disease
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61999 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13858 (DOI)001040681500001 ()37524498 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85166417202 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-21 Created: 2023-08-21 Last updated: 2023-11-10Bibliographically approved
Salvi, G. E. E., Roccuzzo, A., Imber, J.-C., Stahli, A., Klinge, B. & Lang, N. P. P. (2023). Clinical periodontal diagnosis. Periodontology 2000
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical periodontal diagnosis
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2023 (English)In: Periodontology 2000, ISSN 0906-6713, E-ISSN 1600-0757Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Periodontal diseases include pathological conditions elicited by the presence of bacterial biofilms leading to a host response. In the diagnostic process, clinical signs such as bleeding on probing, development of periodontal pockets and gingival recessions, furcation involvement and presence of radiographic bone loss should be assessed prior to periodontal therapy, following active therapy, and during long-term supportive care. In addition, patient-reported outcomes such as increased tooth mobility, migration, and tilting should also be considered. More important to the patient, however, is the fact that assessment of signs of periodontal diseases must be followed by an appropriate treatment plan. Furthermore, it should be realized that clinical and radiographic periodontal diagnosis is based on signs which may not reflect the presence of active disease but rather represent the sequelae of a previous bacterial challenge. Hence, the aim of the present review is to provide a summary of clinical and radiographic diagnostic criteria required to classify patients with periodontal health or disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
WILEY, 2023
Keywords
clinical diagnosis, inflammation, periodontal diseases
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61888 (URN)10.1111/prd.12487 (DOI)001025204500001 ()37452444 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85165255937 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Burisch, J., Pandis, N., Klinge, B. & Stavropoulos, A. (2023). Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study. Journal of Periodontology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Patients with inflammatory bowel disease have more oral health problems and higher costs of professional dental care than healthy controls: The Periodontitis Prevalence in ulcerative Colitis and Crohn disease (PPCC) case-control study
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Periodontology, ISSN 0022-3492, E-ISSN 1943-3670Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: To describe the frequency and impact of oral lesions and professional dental care costs in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (i.e., Crohn disease [CD] or ulcerative colitis [UC]) compared to matched controls).

Methods: IBD patients and matched controls were surveyed on general anamnestic information, eating and drinking habits, and oral health- and dental care-related questions; IBD patients were additionally surveyed on oral lesions. Problems related to oral lesions and the amount of money spent for professional dental care in the past 12 months were defined as primary outcome parameters.

Results: Answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls were analyzed. About 30% of the patients indicated having had problems with oral lesions, with CD patients having 46% higher odds and having them more often in a generalized form compared to UC patients. Further, self-reported severe periodontitis increased the odds of having oral lesions by almost 2.3-times. However, only about 12.5% of IBD patients were informed by their physician about oral lesions and about 10% indicated receiving treatment for them. Compared to controls, IBD patients required more often dental treatment and spent more money; specifically, UC and CD patients had 27 and 89% higher odds, respectively, for having spent ≥3000 DKK (ca. 440 USD) at the dentist compared to controls.

Conclusions: IBD patients have more often oral health problems and higher expenses for professional dental care compared to matched controls. This included problems with IBD-related oral lesions, but these are rarely addressed by the medical or dental team.Keywords: Crohn disease; case-control studies; colitis; dental care; inflammatory bowel diseases; surveys and questionnaires; ulcerative.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2023
Keywords
case-control studies, colitis, Crohn disease, dental care, inflammatory bowel diseases, surveys and questionnaires, ulcerative
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-62487 (URN)10.1002/JPER.23-0325 (DOI)001046841400001 ()37469002 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167700301 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-09-14 Created: 2023-09-14 Last updated: 2023-10-23Bibliographically approved
Sayols-Baixeras, S., Dekkers, K. F., Baldanzi, G., Jönsson, D., Hammar, U., Lin, Y.-T., . . . Fall, T. (2023). Streptococcus Species Abundance in the Gut Is Linked to Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in 8973 Participants From the SCAPIS Cohort. Circulation, 148(6), 459-472
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Streptococcus Species Abundance in the Gut Is Linked to Subclinical Coronary Atherosclerosis in 8973 Participants From the SCAPIS Cohort
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2023 (English)In: Circulation, ISSN 0009-7322, E-ISSN 1524-4539, Vol. 148, no 6, p. 459-472Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Gut microbiota have been implicated in atherosclerotic disease, but their relation with subclinical coronary atherosclerosis is unclear. This study aimed to identify associations between the gut microbiome and computed tomography–based measures of coronary atherosclerosis and to explore relevant clinical correlates.

METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 8973 participants (50 to 65 years of age) without overt atherosclerotic disease from the population-based SCAPIS (Swedish Cardiopulmonary Bioimage Study). Coronary atherosclerosis was measured using coronary artery calcium score and coronary computed tomography angiography. Gut microbiota species abundance and functional potential were assessed with shotgun metagenomics sequencing of fecal samples, and associations with coronary atherosclerosis were evaluated with multivariable regression models adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors. Associated species were evaluated for association with inflammatory markers, metabolites, and corresponding species in saliva.

RESULTS: The mean age of the study sample was 57.4 years, and 53.7% were female. Coronary artery calcification was detected in 40.3%, and 5.4% had at least 1 stenosis with >50% occlusion. Sixty-four species were associated with coronary artery calcium score independent of cardiovascular risk factors, with the strongest associations observed for Streptococcus anginosus and Streptococcus oralis subsp oralis (P<1×10–5). Associations were largely similar across coronary computed tomography angiography–based measurements. Out of the 64 species, 19 species, including streptococci and other species commonly found in the oral cavity, were associated with high-sensitivity C-reactive protein plasma concentrations, and 16 with neutrophil counts. Gut microbial species that are commonly found in the oral cavity were negatively associated with plasma indole propionate and positively associated with plasma secondary bile acids and imidazole propionate. Five species, including 3 streptococci, correlated with the same species in saliva and were associated with worse dental health in the Malmö Offspring Dental Study. Microbial functional potential of dissimilatory nitrate reduction, anaerobic fatty acid β-oxidation, and amino acid degradation were associated with coronary artery calcium score.

CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence of an association of a gut microbiota composition characterized by increased abundance of Streptococcus spp and other species commonly found in the oral cavity with coronary atherosclerosis and systemic inflammation markers. Further longitudinal and experimental studies are warranted to explore the potential implications of a bacterial component in atherogenesis.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Heart Association, 2023
National Category
Cardiac and Cardiovascular Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-62045 (URN)10.1161/circulationaha.123.063914 (DOI)001048683000002 ()37435755 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85167471568 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-22 Created: 2023-08-22 Last updated: 2023-10-17Bibliographically approved
de Vries, C., Ruacho, G., Kindstedt, E., Potempa, B. A., Potempa, J., Klinge, B., . . . Lundberg, K. (2022). Are Increased in Patients with Severe Periodontitis, and Associate with Presence of Specific Autoantibodies and Myocardial Infarction. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 11(4), Article ID 1008.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Are Increased in Patients with Severe Periodontitis, and Associate with Presence of Specific Autoantibodies and Myocardial Infarction
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 1008Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is accumulating data suggesting that periodontitis is associated with increased risk of systemic and autoimmune diseases, including cardiovascular disease, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and there is an unmet need to identify these individuals early. With the periodontal bacteria Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) as one of the key drivers of periodontitis, we set out to investigate whether antibodies to Pg virulence factor arginine gingipain (Rgp) could serve as a biomarker for periodontitis patients at increased risk of autoimmunity and systemic disease. We measured serum anti-Rgp IgG in three study populations: PAROKRANK (779 individuals with myocardial infarction (MI); 719 controls), where 557 had periodontitis, and 312 were positive for autoantibodies associated with RA/SLE; the PerioGene North pilot (41 periodontitis; 39 controls); and an SLE case/control study (101 SLE; 100 controls). Anti-Rgp IgG levels were increased in severe periodontitis compared to controls (p < 0.0001), in individuals positive for anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (p = 0.04) and anti-dsDNA antibodies (p = 0.035), compared to autoantibody-negative individuals; and in MI patients versus matched controls (p = 0.035). Our data support longitudinal studies addressing the role of anti-Rgp antibodies as biomarkers for periodontitis patients at increased risk of developing autoimmunity linked to RA and SLE, and mechanisms underpinning these associations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
Keywords
Porphyromonas gingivalis, anti-citrullinated protein antibodies, anti-double stranded DNA antibodies, arginine gingipains, autoimmunity, myocardial infarction, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus
National Category
Rheumatology and Autoimmunity
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50546 (URN)10.3390/jcm11041008 (DOI)000769728800001 ()35207282 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85124489893 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-10 Created: 2022-03-10 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ferrannini, G., Almosawi, M., Buhlin, K., De Faire, U., Kjellström, B., Klinge, B., . . . Norhammar, A. (2022). Long-term prognosis after a first myocardial infarction: eight years follow up of the case-control study PAROKRANK. Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, 56(1), 337-342
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Long-term prognosis after a first myocardial infarction: eight years follow up of the case-control study PAROKRANK
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2022 (English)In: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal, ISSN 1401-7431, E-ISSN 1651-2006, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 337-342Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective. To explore long-term cardiovascular outcomes and mortality in patients after a first myocardial infarction (MI) compared with matched controls in a contemporary setting. Methods. During 2010–2014 the Swedish study PAROKRANK recruited 805 patients <75 years with a first MI and 805 age-, gender-, and area-matched controls. All study participants were followed until 31 December 2018, through linkage with the National Patient Registry and the Cause of Death Registry. The primary endpoint was the first of a composite of all-cause death, non-fatal MI, non-fatal stroke, and heart failure hospitalization. Event rates in cases and controls were calculated using a Cox regression model, subsequently adjusted for baseline smoking, education level, and marital status. Kaplan–Meier curves were computed and compared by log-rank test. Results. A total of 804 patients and 800 controls (mean age 62 years; women 19%) were followed for a mean of 6.2 (0.2–8.5) years. The total number of primary events was 211. Patients had a higher event rate than controls (log-rank test p < .0001). Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for the primary outcome was 2.04 (95% CI 1.52–2.73). Mortality did not differ between patients (n = 38; 4.7%) and controls (n = 35; 4.4%). A total of 82.5% patients and 91.3% controls were event-free during the follow up. Conclusions. In this long-term follow up of a contemporary, case-control study, the risk for cardiovascular events was higher in patients with a previous first MI compared with their matched controls, while mortality did not differ. The access to high quality of care and cardiac rehabilitation might partly explain the low rates of adverse outcomes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Cardiovascular prevention, PAROKRANK, case-control study, long-term outcome, myocardial infarction
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-54565 (URN)10.1080/14017431.2022.2112072 (DOI)000841682000001 ()35974709 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136039545 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-26 Created: 2022-08-26 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Bertl, K., Burisch, J., Pandis, N., Bruckmann, C., Klinge, B. & Stavropoulos, A. (2022). Periodontitis prevalence in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - PPCC: a case–control study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 49(12), 1262-1274
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Periodontitis prevalence in patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease - PPCC: a case–control study
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 12, p. 1262-1274Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim of this questionnaire-based, case-control study was to assess whether self-reported oral health and periodontitis in ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD) patients differ from that in matched controls without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).

Methods: A survey including questions on general anamnestic information, IBD diagnosis, and oral health was distributed online. Self-perceived overall health of teeth and gums, severe periodontitis, and tooth loss were defined as outcome parameters.

Results: Analyses were based on answers from 1108 IBD patients and 3429 controls. IBD patients reported significantly worse oral health and more periodontal problems compared to controls. Regression analyses corrected for relevant confounders showed for UC and CD patients significantly increased odds for fair or poor self-perceived overall health of teeth and gums (OR 2.147 and 2.736, respectively) and for severe periodontitis (OR 1.739 and 2.574, respectively) compared to controls; CD patients presented additionally 91% higher odds for having <20 remaining teeth.

Conclusions: UC and CD patients have significantly increased odds for worse self-perceived oral health and severe periodontitis compared to controls, with CD patients being more severely affected and losing more teeth. It is strongly recommended that IBD patients are kept under close surveillance to prevent periodontitis development and/or mitigate its progression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell, 2022
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-53859 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13615 (DOI)000842410000001 ()35781889 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85136481042 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-07-12 Created: 2022-07-12 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ottosson, F., Hultgren, L., Fernandez, C., Engström, G., Orho-Melander, M., Kennbäck, C., . . . Jönsson, D. (2022). The inverse association between a fish consumption biomarker with gingival inflammation and periodontitis: a population-based study. Journal of Clinical Periodontology, 49(4), 353-361
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The inverse association between a fish consumption biomarker with gingival inflammation and periodontitis: a population-based study
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Periodontology, ISSN 0303-6979, E-ISSN 1600-051X, Vol. 49, no 4, p. 353-361Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The metabolite 3-Carboxy-4-methyl-5-propyl-2-furanpropionic acid (CMPF) is a fatty fish-intake biomarker. We investigated the association between plasma levels of CMPF in relation to gingival inflammation and periodontitis case definition, as well as extent and severity variables.

METHODS: The Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) is a population-based study, and the Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) is its dental arm, including periodontal charting. Plasma CMPF was measured using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and studied in relation to periodontal diagnosis and parameters using multivariable linear or logistic regression modelling adjusting for age, sex, education, BMI, fasting glucose and smoking.

RESULTS: Metabolite data were available for 922 MODS participants. Higher CMPF levels were associated with less gingival inflammation (beta -2.12, p=0.002), and lower odds of severe periodontitis (OR 0.74, 95% CI=0.56-0.98). Higher CMPF levels were also associated with more teeth (beta 0.19, p=0.001), lower number of periodontal pockets (>4 mm) (beta -1.07, p=0.007) and lower odds of having two or more >6 mm periodontal pockets (OR 0.80, 95% CI=0.65-0.98) in fully adjusted models.

CONCLUSION: CMPF, a validated biomarker of fatty fish consumption, is associated with less periodontal inflammation and periodontitis. Residual confounding cannot be ruled out and future studies are warranted. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
CMPF, fish diet, gingival inflammation, metabolomics, periodontitis
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50053 (URN)10.1111/jcpe.13602 (DOI)000761513900001 ()35132662 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85125390945 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-02-09 Created: 2022-02-09 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Gurzawska-Comis, K., Becker, K., Brunello, G. & Klinge, B. (2021). COVID-19: Review of European recommendations and experts' opinion on dental care. Summary and consensus statements of group 5. The 6th EAO Consensus Conference 2021.. Paper presented at The 6th EAO Consensus Conference, 11–12 February 2021, Virtual Meeting. Clinical Oral Implants Research, 32(S21), 382-388
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COVID-19: Review of European recommendations and experts' opinion on dental care. Summary and consensus statements of group 5. The 6th EAO Consensus Conference 2021.
2021 (English)In: Clinical Oral Implants Research, ISSN 0905-7161, E-ISSN 1600-0501, Vol. 32, no S21, p. 382-388Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The present work reports the EAO Workshop group 5 and consensus plenary discussions and statements based on two reviews summarising European guidelines and experts' opinion on infection control and prevention (ICP) in dentistry during the pandemic.

MATERIAL: Two manuscripts were presented at the 6th EAO Consensus Conference. The first study compared the most recent national guidelines/recommendations of European countries. The second paper was an experts' opinion-based survey on application of ICP regulation during the second wave. The outcome of COVID-19 group discussion was presented to all participants of the consensus to come to an agreement about the consensus statements and clinical recommendation.

RESULTS: The dynamic of the pandemic had an impact on rapidly published and frequently updated national guidelines in Europe. As guidelines were not based on solid evidence, they were supplemented by experts' opinion on ICP in dentistry. The dental care should be guaranteed during the pandemic, however in case of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 disease, the treatment should be postponed if possible. Remote triage and patient-related measures (i.e., social distancing, hand hygiene and mask wearing) were recommended to be the most efficient to reduce SARS-CoV-2 transmission. The type of personal protective equipment for dental staff should be adequate to the procedure and infection risk.

CONCLUSIONS: Adequate infection control protocols have to be followed by healthcare professionals and patients to minimise the spreading of COVID-19. We foresee the importance of continuously updating the national dental guidelines, considering the evolution of the pandemic and new scientific evidence becoming available.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2021
Keywords
COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, infection control, personal protective equipment
National Category
Infectious Medicine
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-44605 (URN)10.1111/clr.13780 (DOI)000715163700023 ()34196063 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85117157711 (Scopus ID)
Conference
The 6th EAO Consensus Conference, 11–12 February 2021, Virtual Meeting
Available from: 2021-07-07 Created: 2021-07-07 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Projects
Biomarkers and biotherapeutics for polymicrobial infections and inflammation; Malmö University, Faculty of Odontology (OD)Health promotion in Collaboration; Malmö University, Faculty of Health and Society (HS), Department of Care Science (VV); Publications
Ramji, R. (2022). Health promotional interventions informed by community-based participatory research in a socially disadvantaged neighbourhood: development, exploration and evaluation. (Doctoral dissertation). Malmö universitet
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-2100-2446

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