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Westerdahl, F., Carlson, E., Wennick, A. & Borglin, G. (2022). Bachelor nursing students´ and their educators´ experiences of teaching strategies targeting critical thinking: A scoping review. Nurse Education in Practice, 63, Article ID 103409.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bachelor nursing students´ and their educators´ experiences of teaching strategies targeting critical thinking: A scoping review
2022 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 63, article id 103409Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The objective of this scoping review was to review the published literature on existing teaching strategies targeting bachelor nursing students' critical thinking and explore how these strategies are described by students and educators. The research questions were: (i) Which teaching strategies are described in the literature targeting critical thinking among nursing students? and (ii) How are these teaching strategies described and experienced by students and/or nurse educators?

BACKGROUND: Critical thinking is integrated in the many clinical assignments and responsibilities with which registered nurses are faced. Therefore, it is important that nurse educators implement teaching strategies supporting bachelor nursing students' development of critical thinking to prepare them for their professional responsibilities.

DESIGN: Scoping review, Open Science Framework (OSF) registries DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/D89SB.

METHODS: The scoping review followed the six steps of Arksey and O'Malley (2005). Systematic searches were conducted using the databases PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, ERC and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were quality assessed and text excerpts answering the research questions were analysed by a thematic analysis.

RESULTS: Our findings represent 19 published studies and can be understood according to two themes: the importance of the educational conditions and the impact of implemented teaching strategies. The first theme reflected not only the descriptions of important traits in the educational milieu facilitating the development of critical thinking but also the importance of how the content targeting such skills were delivered and organised. The second theme mirrored descriptions of how the students, through the teaching strategies, realized the need for collaboration to facilitate critical thinking. Further, it showed how the teaching strategies fostered professional growth and learning adaptation, by encouraging the students to question their knowledge and facilitating their development of clinical knowledge.

CONCLUSIONS: The strategies used in the facilitation of critical thinking need to incorporate collaboration and student-centredness, creating a relaxed climate where the educators can assist through guidance and support. This calls for the implementation of teaching strategies whereby both educators and students are active in facilitating the learning environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Bachelor in Nursing, Critical thinking, Education, Educational research, Literature review, Nursing, Qualitative analysis, Teaching strategy
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-54115 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2022.103409 (DOI)000831354100002 ()35868062 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134843503 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-02 Created: 2022-08-02 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Appelgren, M., Persson, K., Bahtsevani, C. & Borglin, G. (2022). Swedish registered nurses' perceptions of caring for patients with intellectual and developmental disability: A qualitative descriptive study. Health & Social Care in the Community, 30(3), 1064-1076
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Swedish registered nurses' perceptions of caring for patients with intellectual and developmental disability: A qualitative descriptive study
2022 (English)In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 1064-1076Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Patients with intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) are often misinterpreted and misunderstood. Studies show that, in general, healthcare professionals have limited knowledge about IDD, and registered nurses (RNs) often report feeling unprepared to support this group of patients. Therefore, more knowledge about how to adequately address care for this patient group is warranted. This qualitative study employs an interpretative descriptive design to explore and describe Swedish RNs' perceptions of caring for patients with IDD, here in a home-care setting. Twenty RNs were interviewed between September 2018 and May 2019, and the resulting data were analysed through an inductive qualitative content analysis. The study adheres to consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research (COREQ). Our analysis found that nurses' perceptions of caring for patients with an IDD could be understood from three overarching categories: nursing held hostage in the context of care, care dependent on intuition and proven experience and contending for the patients' right to adequate care. Our findings show that the home-care context and organisation were not adjusted to the needs of the patients. This resulted in RNs feeling unable to provide care in accordance with their professional values. They also explained that they had not mastered the available augmentative and alternative communication tools, instead using support staff as interpreters for their patients. Finally, on a daily basis, the RNs caring for this group of patients took an active stance and fought for the patients' right to receive the right care at the right time by the right person. This was particularly the case with issues involving psychiatric care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2022
Keywords
content analysis, intellectual and development disability, interview, nurses, qualitative research
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-42492 (URN)10.1111/hsc.13307 (DOI)000651886700001 ()34009687 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85106260426 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-05-31 Created: 2021-05-31 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Borglin, G., Hew Thach, E., Jeppsson, M. & Sjögren Forss, K. (2020). Registered nurse's experiences of continence care for older people: A qualitative descriptive study (ed.). International Journal of Older People Nursing, 15(1), Article ID e12275.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurse's experiences of continence care for older people: A qualitative descriptive study
2020 (English)In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 15, no 1, article id e12275Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: This study aimed to illuminate nurses’ experience of continence care for older people receiving home care, either in their own home or in an assisted living facility. Background: Registered Nurses (RNs) have a major role to play in identifying and establishing appropriate actions regarding continence care for older people. However, the crucial nursing care pathway for continence care is commonly described as poor. Methods: Interviews were conducted with 11 RNs providing home care, and the transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Result The impressions of RNs were categorised according to four themes: perceptions of continence care, an open approach to continence care, the need for personalised aid fittings and the importance of teamwork in continence care. Key findings were the importance of teamwork; the need for nurses to embrace leadership at the point of care and be more visible in terms of the provision of direct care; substantiation that evidence‐based interventions, such as scheduled toileting and prompted voiding, should constitute the norm in continence care within the context of home care; and the need for nurses to support the right of older persons to receive an assessment of their continence problems, deemed to be the minimum standard of quality care. Conclusion: The provision of continence care that is based on key nursing standards, such as evidence‐based and person‐centred care, as well as individualised continence care that is based on evidenced‐based guidelines, would ensure an improvement in the continence care that is presently on offer to older people.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020
Keywords
content analysis, home care, nursing, qualitative design, urinary incontinence
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-5583 (URN)10.1111/opn.12275 (DOI)000488401500001 ()31577389 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073938821 (Scopus ID)30282 (Local ID)30282 (Archive number)30282 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Borglin, G., Eriksson, M., Rosén, M. & Axelsson, M. (2020). Registered nurses' experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital- acquired pneumonia at in-patient stroke units: a qualitative descriptive study. BMC Nursing, 19(1), Article ID 124.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurses' experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital- acquired pneumonia at in-patient stroke units: a qualitative descriptive study
2020 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 124Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe registered nurses' (RNs) experiences of providing respiratory care in relation to hospital acquired pneumonia (HAP), specifically among patients with acute stroke being cared for at in-patient stroke units.

BACKGROUND: One of the most common and serious respiratory complications associated with acute stroke is HAP. Respiratory care is among the fundamentals of patient care, and thus competency in this field is expected as part of nursing training. However, there is a paucity of literature detailing RNs' experiences with respiratory care in relation to HAP, specifically among patients with acute stroke, in the context of stroke units. As such, there is a need to expand the knowledge base relating to respiratory care focusing on HAP, to assist with evidence-based nursing.

DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study.

METHOD: Eleven RNs working in four different acute stroke units in Southern Sweden participated in the current study. The data were collected through semi-structured interviews, and the transcribed interviews were analysed using inductive content analysis.

RESULTS: Three overarching categories were identified: (1), awareness of risk assessments and risk factors for HAP (2) targeting HAP through multiple nursing care actions, and (3) challenges in providing respiratory care to patients in risk of HAP. These reflected the similarities and differences in the experiences that RNs had with providing respiratory care in relation to HAP among in-patients with acute stroke.

CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this study suggest that the RNs experience organisational challenges in providing respiratory care for HAP among patients with acute stroke. Respiratory care plays a vital role in the identification and prevention of HAP, but our findings imply that RNs' knowledge needs to be improved, the fundamentals of nursing care need to be prioritised, and evidence-based guidelines must be implemented. RNs would also benefit from further education and support, in order to lead point-of-care nursing in multidisciplinary stroke teams.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2020
Keywords
Content analysis, Fundamentals of care, Nursing, Qualitative research, Stroke care
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-37780 (URN)10.1186/s12912-020-00518-7 (DOI)000601211100001 ()33342427 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85097824197 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2021-01-05 Created: 2021-01-05 Last updated: 2023-10-24Bibliographically approved
Westerdahl, F., Carlson, E., Wennick, A. & Borglin, G. (2020). Teaching strategies and outcome assessments targeting critical thinking in bachelor nursing students: a scoping review protocol.. BMJ Open, 10(1), Article ID e033214.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching strategies and outcome assessments targeting critical thinking in bachelor nursing students: a scoping review protocol.
2020 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 1, article id e033214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Applying critical thinking is essential for nursing students both in an academic and clinical context. Particularly, as critical thinking is a vital part of nurses' everyday problem-solving and decision-making processes. Therefore, regardless of the topic taught or the setting in which it is taught, it requires teaching strategies especially targeting students' critical thinking skills and abilities. One challenge with the latter is the difficulties to assess and evaluate the impact of such teaching strategies on the students' critical thinking disposition. Hence, our objective will be to review published literature on; existing teaching strategies and outcomes assessments targeting nursing students' critical thinking skills and abilities.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Our scoping review will be conducted in accordance with Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping studies. Search strategies will be developed in cooperation with an experienced librarian, and adjusted to each individual database for example, CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and ERC. A preliminary search in CINAHL was conducted on the 17th of July 2019. Peer-reviewed published studies conducted with a qualitative, quantitative or mixed method design and focussing our objectives, will be eligible for inclusion. Included studies will be quality assessed in accordance with their study design. Data will be charted using a standardised extraction form. The qualitative data will be presented through a thematic analyses, and the quantitative data by descriptive numerical analysis. Lastly, nurse educators and nursing students will be consulted for validation of the findings from the scoping review.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Under the Swedish Ethical Review Act (2003:460) this study does not need ethical clearance by a Regional Ethical Review Authority as it not includes any primary empirical data on biological material or sensitive information. The findings will be used to inform the design of a future study aiming to develop an, and subsequently evaluate it, educational intervention targeting teaching strategies focussing on nursing students' critical thinking skills and abilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2020
Keywords
critical thinking abilities, critical thinking skills, descriptive numerical analysis, nurse educators, thematic analysis
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-13776 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033214 (DOI)000519306600107 ()32014875 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078882178 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-12 Created: 2020-03-12 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Theodoridis, K., Noghi, A. & Borglin, G. (2020). The discharge conversation: a phenomenographic interview study. BMC Nursing, 19(1), Article ID 59.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The discharge conversation: a phenomenographic interview study
2020 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 59Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background Studies have highlighted deficiencies in the information given by nurses to surgical patients. Studies also show that the role of the nurse in connection with the discharge of patients after surgery is unclear. The aim of the study was therefore to elicit and to explore registered nurses' conceptions of the phenomenon ofnursing care information given to surgical patients in connection with hospital discharge. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with fifteen nurses at surgical unites at the southern parts of Sweden. The interviews were transcribed and then analysed according to the phenomenographic approach. Result The analysis resulted into three descriptive categories which conjointly may be said to express the general conceptions of the informants. Thus, according to the informants, the provision of nursing care information in connection with the discharge of surgical patients is: (i) not a nursing priority, (ii) adapted to the context of care, and (iii) a possible enhancement of the nursing process and the quality of care. Conclusion The result of the study implies that the discharge conversation may be seen as an opportunity for the nursing profession to formalise and to enhance the quality of care in connection with the discharge of surgical patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2020
Keywords
Information, Communication, Nurse-patient-relationship, Discharge conversation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-17978 (URN)10.1186/s12912-020-00452-8 (DOI)000546999500001 ()32624704 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087458901 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-08-17 Created: 2020-08-17 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Richards, D. A., Bazeley, P., Borglin, G., Craig, P., Emsley, R., Frost, J., . . . O'Cathain, A. (2019). Integrating quantitative and qualitative data and findings when undertaking randomised controlled trials. (ed.). BMJ Open, 9(11), Article ID e032081.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Integrating quantitative and qualitative data and findings when undertaking randomised controlled trials.
Show others...
2019 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 9, no 11, article id e032081Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It is common to undertake qualitative research alongside randomised controlled trials (RCTs) when evaluating complex interventions. Researchers tend to analyse these datasets one by one and then consider their findings separately within the discussion section of the final report, rarely integrating quantitative and qualitative data or findings, and missing opportunities to combine data in order to add rigour, enabling thorough and more complete analysis, provide credibility to results, and generate further important insights about the intervention under evaluation. This paper reports on a 2 day expert meeting funded by the United Kingdom Medical Research Council Hubs for Trials Methodology Research with the aims to identify current strengths and weaknesses in the integration of quantitative and qualitative methods in clinical trials, establish the next steps required to provide the trials community with guidance on the integration of mixed methods in RCTs and set-up a network of individuals, groups and organisations willing to collaborate on related methodological activity. We summarise integration techniques and go beyond previous publications by highlighting the potential value of integration using three examples that are specific to RCTs. We suggest that applying mixed methods integration techniques to data or findings from studies involving both RCTs and qualitative research can yield insights that might be useful for understanding variation in outcomes, the mechanism by which interventions have an impact, and identifying ways of tailoring therapy to patient preference and type. Given a general lack of examples and knowledge of these techniques, researchers and funders will need future guidance on how to undertake and appraise them.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2019
Keywords
integration, qualitative, quantitative, research methods, trials
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4836 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-032081 (DOI)000512774800273 ()31772096 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075672233 (Scopus ID)30495 (Local ID)30495 (Archive number)30495 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Sjögren Forss, K., Persson, K. & Borglin, G. (2019). Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review (ed.). Nurse Education in Practice, 37, 97-104
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nursing students' experiences of caring for ethnically and culturally diverse patients: A scoping review
2019 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 37, p. 97-104Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Little is known about nursing students' experiences of caring for patients from diverse cultures, which is an important factor in educational settings when it comes to understanding whether the teaching strategies applied are successful. Thus, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review of the literature, thereby synthesising existing studies to explore nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with different cultural backgrounds from theirs. A systematic article search was done in PubMed, CINAHL and ERIC. A total of 996 studies were found in the searches and finally seven studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. The analysis of the seven included studies was interpreted to represent two overarching themes, namely the challenge of communication and non-mutual language and the challenge of culture and culturally influenced behaviour, representing nursing students' experiences of caring for patients with a different cultural background from theirs. A major challenge for nursing educators appears to be creating pedagogical interventions that cultivate a humble, solicitous and caring curiosity among students, such that they do not perceive only challenges in caring for culturally diverse patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Care, Cultural diversity, Experiences, Nursing students, Patients, Scoping review
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-825 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2019.05.003 (DOI)000473840000014 ()31129531 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066434915 (Scopus ID)28797 (Local ID)28797 (Archive number)28797 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-27 Created: 2020-02-27 Last updated: 2024-02-06Bibliographically approved
Borglin, G., Räthel, K., Helene, P. & Sjögren Forss, K. (2019). Registered nurse’s working at elderly care centers experience of depressive symptoms among older people: a qualitative descriptive study (ed.). BMC Nursing, 18, Article ID 43.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Registered nurse’s working at elderly care centers experience of depressive symptoms among older people: a qualitative descriptive study
2019 (English)In: BMC Nursing, ISSN 1472-6955, E-ISSN 1472-6955, Vol. 18, article id 43Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: Depressive symptoms and/or depression are commonly experienced by older people. Both are underdiagnosed, undertreated and regularly overlooked by healthcare professionals. Healthcare facilities for people aged ≥ 75 years have been in place in Sweden since 2015. The aim of these care centres, which are managed by registered nurses (RNs), is to offer care adjusted to cater to the complex needs and health problems of older people. Although the mental health of older people is prioritised in these centres, research into the experience of RNs of depressive symptoms and/or depression in older people in this setting is limited. Therefore, this study aimed to illuminate RNs, working at care centres for older people, experience of identifying and intervening in cases of depressive symptoms. Methods: The data for this qualitative descriptive study were collected through interviews (n = 10) with RNs working at 10 care centres for older people in southern Sweden. The transcribed texts were analysed using inductive content analysis. Results: The participants’ experiences could be understood from four predominant themes: (1) challenging to identify, (2) described interventions, (3) prerequisites for identification, and (4) contextual influences. Key findings were that it was difficult to identify depression as it often manifested as physical symptoms; evidence-based nursing interventions were generally not the first-line treatment used; trust, continuity and the ability of RNs to think laterally; and the context influenced the ability of RNs to manage older people’s depressive symptoms and/or depression. Conclusions: The process of identifying depressive symptoms and performing an appropriate intervention was found to be complex, especially as older people were reluctant to present at the centres and provided obscure reasons for doing so. A nurse-patient relationship that was built on trust and was characterised by continuity of care was identified as a necessary prerequisite. Appropriate nursing interventions—afforded the same status as pharmacological treatment—are warranted as the first-line treatment of depression. Further research is also needed into efficacious nursing interventions targeting depressive symptoms and/or depression.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2019
Keywords
Content analysis, Care centres for older people, Nursing, Qualitative research, Registered nurses
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14667 (URN)10.1186/s12912-019-0368-5 (DOI)000484622800001 ()31516384 (PubMedID)29860 (Local ID)29860 (Archive number)29860 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Richards, D. A. & Borglin, G. (2019). Shitty Nursing: The New Normal? (ed.). International Journal of Nursing Studies, 91(1), 148-152
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Shitty Nursing: The New Normal?
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 91, no 1, p. 148-152Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In this article we ask our profession to consider whether something is rotten at the core of modern nursing. We will use our own experiences as patients, together with published literature, to ask questions of our profession in perpetrating what one of our colleagues recently, and with great embarrassment, referred to as ‘shitty nursing’. Our intention is most certainly not to offend any readers, for this term has been used in literature for more than one hundred years to describe bad situations, including those where events or people’s behaviour are of a low standard. Our intention instead, is to challenge ourselves, the profession and you the reader by raising a measured debate which seems at present to be missing within the profession. We examine the potential idea that poor nursing care may not be the exception, but horrifyingly, may be the new normal. We are particularly concerned that patients’ fundamental care needs may be falling into an ever widening gap between assistant and registered nurses. Whilst we acknowledge the potential causes of poor nursing care, causes that are often cited by nurses themselves, we come to the conclusion that a mature profession including clinicians, educators, administrators, researchers and regulators cannot continually blame contextual factors for its failings. A mature profession with an intact contract between itself and society must shoulder some of the responsibility for its own problems. We do suggest a way forward, including a mix of reconciliation, refocus and research, underpinned by what we argue is a much needed dose of professional humility. Readers may take us to task for potentially overstating the problem, ignoring non-nursing drivers, and downplaying other significant factors. You may think that there is much in nursing to glory in. However, we make no apology for presenting our views. Our lived experiences tell us something different. As professional nurses our main aim is to ensure that our adverse experiences as patients are statistical anomalies, and our future encounters with nursing care represent all that we know to be excellent in our profession. We leave you to judge and comment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4149 (URN)10.1016/j.ijnurstu.2018.12.018 (DOI)000466616700020 ()30831477 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85060223785 (Scopus ID)27502 (Local ID)27502 (Archive number)27502 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-7934-6949

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