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Westerdahl, F., Carlson, E., Wennick, A. & Borglin, G. (2022). Bachelor nursing students´ and their educators´ experiences of teaching strategies targeting critical thinking: A scoping review. Nurse Education in Practice, 63, Article ID 103409.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bachelor nursing students´ and their educators´ experiences of teaching strategies targeting critical thinking: A scoping review
2022 (English)In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 63, article id 103409Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

AIM: The objective of this scoping review was to review the published literature on existing teaching strategies targeting bachelor nursing students' critical thinking and explore how these strategies are described by students and educators. The research questions were: (i) Which teaching strategies are described in the literature targeting critical thinking among nursing students? and (ii) How are these teaching strategies described and experienced by students and/or nurse educators?

BACKGROUND: Critical thinking is integrated in the many clinical assignments and responsibilities with which registered nurses are faced. Therefore, it is important that nurse educators implement teaching strategies supporting bachelor nursing students' development of critical thinking to prepare them for their professional responsibilities.

DESIGN: Scoping review, Open Science Framework (OSF) registries DOI: 10.17605/OSF.IO/D89SB.

METHODS: The scoping review followed the six steps of Arksey and O'Malley (2005). Systematic searches were conducted using the databases PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, ERC and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were quality assessed and text excerpts answering the research questions were analysed by a thematic analysis.

RESULTS: Our findings represent 19 published studies and can be understood according to two themes: the importance of the educational conditions and the impact of implemented teaching strategies. The first theme reflected not only the descriptions of important traits in the educational milieu facilitating the development of critical thinking but also the importance of how the content targeting such skills were delivered and organised. The second theme mirrored descriptions of how the students, through the teaching strategies, realized the need for collaboration to facilitate critical thinking. Further, it showed how the teaching strategies fostered professional growth and learning adaptation, by encouraging the students to question their knowledge and facilitating their development of clinical knowledge.

CONCLUSIONS: The strategies used in the facilitation of critical thinking need to incorporate collaboration and student-centredness, creating a relaxed climate where the educators can assist through guidance and support. This calls for the implementation of teaching strategies whereby both educators and students are active in facilitating the learning environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2022
Keywords
Bachelor in Nursing, Critical thinking, Education, Educational research, Literature review, Nursing, Qualitative analysis, Teaching strategy
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-54115 (URN)10.1016/j.nepr.2022.103409 (DOI)000831354100002 ()35868062 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85134843503 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-08-02 Created: 2022-08-02 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Westerdahl, F., Carlson, E., Wennick, A. & Borglin, G. (2020). Teaching strategies and outcome assessments targeting critical thinking in bachelor nursing students: a scoping review protocol.. BMJ Open, 10(1), Article ID e033214.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Teaching strategies and outcome assessments targeting critical thinking in bachelor nursing students: a scoping review protocol.
2020 (English)In: BMJ Open, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 10, no 1, article id e033214Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

INTRODUCTION: Applying critical thinking is essential for nursing students both in an academic and clinical context. Particularly, as critical thinking is a vital part of nurses' everyday problem-solving and decision-making processes. Therefore, regardless of the topic taught or the setting in which it is taught, it requires teaching strategies especially targeting students' critical thinking skills and abilities. One challenge with the latter is the difficulties to assess and evaluate the impact of such teaching strategies on the students' critical thinking disposition. Hence, our objective will be to review published literature on; existing teaching strategies and outcomes assessments targeting nursing students' critical thinking skills and abilities.

METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Our scoping review will be conducted in accordance with Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping studies. Search strategies will be developed in cooperation with an experienced librarian, and adjusted to each individual database for example, CINAHL, PubMed, PsycINFO, ERIC and ERC. A preliminary search in CINAHL was conducted on the 17th of July 2019. Peer-reviewed published studies conducted with a qualitative, quantitative or mixed method design and focussing our objectives, will be eligible for inclusion. Included studies will be quality assessed in accordance with their study design. Data will be charted using a standardised extraction form. The qualitative data will be presented through a thematic analyses, and the quantitative data by descriptive numerical analysis. Lastly, nurse educators and nursing students will be consulted for validation of the findings from the scoping review.

ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Under the Swedish Ethical Review Act (2003:460) this study does not need ethical clearance by a Regional Ethical Review Authority as it not includes any primary empirical data on biological material or sensitive information. The findings will be used to inform the design of a future study aiming to develop an, and subsequently evaluate it, educational intervention targeting teaching strategies focussing on nursing students' critical thinking skills and abilities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 2020
Keywords
critical thinking abilities, critical thinking skills, descriptive numerical analysis, nurse educators, thematic analysis
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-13776 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2019-033214 (DOI)000519306600107 ()32014875 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85078882178 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-03-12 Created: 2020-03-12 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Carlson, E., Nygren, F. & Wennick, A. (2018). Critical Friends: Health Professionals' Experiences of Collegial Feedback in a Clinical Setting (ed.). Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, 38(3), 179-183
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Critical Friends: Health Professionals' Experiences of Collegial Feedback in a Clinical Setting
2018 (English)In: Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, ISSN 0894-1912, E-ISSN 1554-558X, Vol. 38, no 3, p. 179-183Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: A critical friend is a trusted person who asks provocative questions, provides data to be examined through another lens, and offers critique of a person's work as part of collegial feedback. However, empirical evidence presenting the use of collegial feedback to develop health professionals’ competence in clinical settings seems to be scarce. The aim of this study was to explore health professionals’ experiences of observing each other as critical friends in a clinical setting, as part of a continuous professional development initiative. Methods: The study was designed as a qualitative inductive study. Reflective journals written by health professionals (n=57) were analysed using thematic networks. The health professionals represented registered nurses and registered nurses with different specialist education (for example in paediatrics, mental health, intensive care and anaesthesiology), biomedical scientists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists and dental hygienists. Results: Health professionals can successfully use collegial feedback and benefit from critical friendships in clinical settings as it offers ample opportunities for reflection before, during and after the observation. A key finding was that in order to incorporate changes to professional practice, each individual needs to not only to act as a critical friend, but also experience being observed by a critical friend. Discussion: Based on the results of this study, it seems worthwhile to implement and further develop opportunities for health professionals to act as critical friends. We suggest that future research explore not only how professional competence develops over time, but also how it impacts on health related outcomes for patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018
Keywords
clinical setting, critical friend, collegial feedback, health care professional
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-14746 (URN)10.1097/CEH.0000000000000210 (DOI)000447398800006 ()29944482 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056519777 (Scopus ID)26014 (Local ID)26014 (Archive number)26014 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Nygren, F. & Carlson, E. (2017). Preceptors' conceptions of a peer learning model: A phenomenographic study (ed.). Nurse Education Today, 49, 12-16
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Preceptors' conceptions of a peer learning model: A phenomenographic study
2017 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 49, p. 12-16Article in journal (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Background: During the past few years nurses precepting undergraduate nursing students have been put under greater pressure because of increased number of students admitted to the universities combinedwith a shortage of clinical placements. One solution is the preceptor model peer learning where two students are tutored by the same preceptor simultaneously. Objectives: The aim of this study was to describe the variation of registered nurses' conceptions of preceptorship in a peer learning model for undergraduate nursing students. Design: The study used a qualitative descriptive design and a phenomenographic approach. Settings: The interviews took place at somatic and psychiatric units at two different hospitals in southern Sweden. Participants: Twelve informants participated who had worked as registered nurses between 1–17 years and acted as peer learning preceptors between 2 month and 6 years. Methods: Each nurse was interviewed individually using a semi structured interview guide. Follow up questions were used to make the informants develop and deepen their answers. Results: Four different descriptive categories emerged in the study: 1) Preceptorship in peer learning generates development and new perspectives 2) Preceptorship in peer learning enables student reflection and independence 3) Preceptorship in peer learning engenders insufficiency and stress 4) Preceptorship in peer learning requires education and support. Conclusions: The result of this study showed that preceptors conceived that peer learning enabled them to take a step backwhich gave thema new role and perspectives. The consequencewas that the students could be more independent which saved time for some of the preceptors. However, some preceptors perceived insufficiency and stress while working with two students. It is also important to educate both students and preceptors to optimise the use of peer learning.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Conceptions, Nursing, Peer learning, Phenomenography, Preceptorship
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-4427 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2016.10.015 (DOI)000392887900003 ()27865125 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84995578334 (Scopus ID)22047 (Local ID)22047 (Archive number)22047 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-4086-0086

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