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Arvidsson, A., Grander, A. & Lindroth, M. (2024). School health-care team members’ reflections of their promotion of sexualand reproductive health and rights (SRHR): Important but neglected. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 39, Article ID 100950.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>School health-care team members’ reflections of their promotion of sexualand reproductive health and rights (SRHR): Important but neglected
2024 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 39, article id 100950Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Young people are prioritized regarding the promotion and safeguarding of sexual and reproductivehealth and rights – SRHR. In Sweden, the school is seen as an important arena with members of the school healthcare or SHC team as vital actors in this work. This study explored SRHR-related work in SHC teams in Sweden.

Methods: Within an explorative qualitative design, structured interviews were conducted with 33 nurses, counsellors, SHC unit managers and headmasters. Reflexive thematic analysis was applied, and two main themesfound.

Results: SHC team members see SRHR as an urgent topic, but address it only ‘when necessary’, not systematically– and they experience a shortage of guidance and cooperation regarding SRHR-related work. Even in a countrywith agreement on the importance of SRHR for all and on providing holistic comprehensive sex education inschools, young people are left to chance – i.e., to the SRHR competence in the professionals they meet.

Conclusion: SHC team members in Sweden see SRHR as an urgent topic but do not address it systematically.Moreover, they experience a shortage of guidance for their work. To avoid any professional stress of conscienceand for equitable school health care regarding SRHR to be realized, research-informed policy needs to underlinesystematic, comparable and proactive practice.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Ethical stress, Health equity, Health promotion, Sexuality
National Category
Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-65853 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2024.100950 (DOI)38335840 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85184742859 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Public Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2024-02-09 Created: 2024-02-09 Last updated: 2024-02-27Bibliographically approved
Carlström, C., Andersson, C. & Lindroth, M. (2023). LGBTQ plus Affirmative State Care for Young People in Sweden: New Knowledge and Old Traditions. British Journal of Social Work, 53(8), 3744-3760
Open this publication in new window or tab >>LGBTQ plus Affirmative State Care for Young People in Sweden: New Knowledge and Old Traditions
2023 (English)In: British Journal of Social Work, ISSN 0045-3102, E-ISSN 1468-263X, Vol. 53, no 8, p. 3744-3760Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young LGBTQ+ people are over-represented in various forms of state care. They experience hardships during their placements and staff competence in addressing specific needs among LGBTQ+ youth is lacking. In this article, we investigate whether and how LGTBQ+ issues are considered and described in digital marketing for state care providers. The material consists of the homepages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions, which we analyse using critical discourse analysis. The results show that LGBTQ+ issues are largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing state care providers, only twenty stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. Among these, no secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study. The descriptions of how care providers work with LGBTQ+ issues are characterised by heteronormativity where there is a mix of two types of language on the homepages regarding LGBTQ+ youth; on the one hand, a heteronormative, traditional description based on a binary understanding of gender; and, on the other, an LGBTQ+ inclusive language is used. However, the LGBTQ+ affirmative language has been imposed upon the traditional rather than being integrated into it, which comes across as superficial and unclear. International studies show that LGBTQ+ youth are over-represented in various forms of state care. Using critical discourse analysis, we investigated how LGBTQ+ youth, as a target group, are described and how LGBTQ+ competence is presented on the home pages of residential care homes and secure state care institutions for young people in Sweden. The results show that LGBTQ is largely invisible. Of the approximately 1,000 existing residential care homes, only 20 stated that they worked with or had competence in LGBTQ+ issues. No secure state care institution offered LGBTQ+ competence at the time of the study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2023
Keywords
critical discourse analysis, LGBTQ, state care, Sweden, youth
National Category
Gender Studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-61925 (URN)10.1093/bjsw/bcad152 (DOI)001008158700001 ()2-s2.0-85180107616 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-08-16 Created: 2023-08-16 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Schindele, A. C., Källberg, H., Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Lindroth, M. (2023). Perceived knowledge gained from school-based sexuality education – results from a national population-based survey among young people in Sweden. Sexual Health, 20(6), 566-576
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Perceived knowledge gained from school-based sexuality education – results from a national population-based survey among young people in Sweden
2023 (English)In: Sexual Health, ISSN 1448-5028, E-ISSN 1449-8987, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 566-576Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

School-based sexuality education is a core component of securing young people’s right to attain health equity regarding sexual and reproductive health and rights. This paper aims to explore how perceived knowledge (sufficient or insufficient) of taking care of one’s sexual health is associated with knowledge gained from school-based sexuality education and social determinants.MethodsThe data material is drawn from a population-based survey conducted in Sweden in 2015. The survey had 7755 respondents and a response rate of 26%. To explore the aim descriptive statistics and logistic regression models were used.

Results

Our results show that perceived insufficient knowledge from school-based sexuality education was associated with higher odds of reporting not being able to take care of one’s sexual health. The highest significant excess risk for insufficient knowledge was found among young people from sexual minorities.

Conclusions

Young people in Sweden do not have equal abilities to receive knowledge needed to take care of their sexual health and thus attain sexual health literacy. There is an unequal distribution of perceived knowledge, and LGBTQI+ youth particularly face barriers in using school-based sexuality education as a resource for sexual health literacy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
CSIRO Publishing, 2023
Keywords
SRHR, Sexual health, Gender, Intersectionality
National Category
Gender Studies Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64628 (URN)10.1071/sh23093 (DOI)001150503500006 ()37925747 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85180009366 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-20 Created: 2023-12-20 Last updated: 2024-02-26Bibliographically approved
Bahner, J. & Lindroth, M. (2023). Researchers With Benefits? Methodological and Ethical Challenges and Possibilities in Sexuality Research Within Marginalised Populations. International Journal of Qualitative Methods, 22
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Researchers With Benefits? Methodological and Ethical Challenges and Possibilities in Sexuality Research Within Marginalised Populations
2023 (English)In: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, E-ISSN 1609-4069, Vol. 22Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2023
National Category
Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-60097 (URN)10.1177/16094069231171095 (DOI)2-s2.0-85160404565 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-06-06 Created: 2023-06-06 Last updated: 2024-01-17Bibliographically approved
Schindele, A. C., Areskoug Josefsson, K. & Lindroth, M. (2022). Analysing intersecting social resources in young people’s ability to suggest safer sex - results from a national population-based survey in Sweden. BMC Public Health, 22(1), Article ID 1285.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysing intersecting social resources in young people’s ability to suggest safer sex - results from a national population-based survey in Sweden
2022 (English)In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 1285Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Safer sex is one of the most crucial areas in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR). Drawingon the theory of health promotion where social life generates resources for health our hypothesis is that having controlover one’s life situation, affects the ability for safer sex and thereby sexual health. The aim is to explore the associationbetween having control over one’s life and the ability to suggest safer sex among young people aged 16–29, andhow this plays out in relation to membership of six constructed social groups based on: gender, transgender experience,sexual identity, economy, being foreign-born, and social welfare recipiency followed by an in-depth analysis ofthe intersection of gender and sexual identity.

Methods

The data set comprises cross-sectional survey responses from a stratified random sample of 7755 in thetotal Swedish population of young people. The SRHR-focused questionnaire was developed within the HIV-monitoringprogram at the Public Health Agency of Sweden. Data collection was conducted by Statistics Sweden betweenApril 15 and June 8 in 2015. The survey had a response rate of 26%, which was in line with the study design. Statisticalanalysis was used to explore the self-reported outcome variable ability for safer sex and the exposure variable controlover one’s life. The methods used comprise multivariate logistic regression and an intersecting multivariate regressionexploring 12 intersecting social positions by gender and sexual identity.

Results

The results show that young people’s control over their lives is associated with their ability for safer sex. Dueto this, control over one’s life can be seen as a resource for safer sex. The associations in the 12 intersecting social positionsshowed complex patterns.Conclusions: The intersections of resources show the complexity and that gender cannot account for all differencesin the resources for young people’s ability to suggest safer sex. Implications for policy and practitioners involve bothaddressing and strengthening the sexual rights of young people from sexual minorities and tailoring interventions ina way that takes the intersections between gender and sexual identity into consideration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central (BMC), 2022
Keywords
Intersectionality, Health promotion, Sexual health, Safer sex, SRHR, Young people
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-53868 (URN)10.1186/s12889-022-13672-1 (DOI)000820638300006 ()35787796 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85133226259 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Malmö UniversityPublic Health Agency of Sweden
Available from: 2022-07-14 Created: 2022-07-14 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Hammarström, S., Bernhardsson, S., Nilsen, P., Elisson, J., Frostholm, E. & Lindroth, M. (2022). Ask me, listen to me, treat me well and I shall tell: a qualitative study of Swedish youths' experiences of systematic assessment of sexual health and risk-taking (SEXIT). Sexual and reproductive health matters, 30(1), 1-16, Article ID 2146032.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Ask me, listen to me, treat me well and I shall tell: a qualitative study of Swedish youths' experiences of systematic assessment of sexual health and risk-taking (SEXIT)
Show others...
2022 (English)In: Sexual and reproductive health matters, ISSN 2641-0397, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 1-16, article id 2146032Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sexual ill health among young people, in terms of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), unintended pregnancy, transactional sex and sexual violence, is a global public health concern. To that end, the SEXual health Identification Tool (SEXIT) was developed. The purpose of this study was to explore the visitors' experiences of a youth clinic visit when SEXIT was used. A purposively selected sample of 20 participants (16-24 years of age) was recruited from three Swedish youth clinics using SEXIT. Participants were interviewed individually in March and April 2016, and data were analysed using inductive qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in four main categories describing the participants' experiences of using SEXIT: "Issues of concern" includes descriptions of the items in SEXIT as important; "Enabling disclosure" describes how SEXIT serves as an invitation to talk and facilitates disclosure of negative experiences; "Road to change" captures experiences of the conversation with the healthcare professional; and "Managing power imbalance" describes experiences regarding the response and attitudes of the healthcare professional as well as the participants' fears of being judged. The categories are connected by the overarching theme "Ask me, listen to me, treat me well and I shall tell". This study contributes knowledge on young people's experiences of a tool-supported dialogue on sexual health and risk-taking initiated by the healthcare professional. Structured questions in a written format, as a basis for dialogue, are appreciated and experienced as a functioning way of addressing sexual ill health and risk-taking at Swedish youth clinics.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
adolescents, qualitative research, risk assessment, sexual behaviour, sexual violence, sexually transmitted infections, unintended pregnancy, young adults, youth clinic
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56628 (URN)10.1080/26410397.2022.2146032 (DOI)000893738600001 ()36476113 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143399975 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-12-14 Created: 2022-12-14 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Larsdotter, S., Lemon, J. & Lindroth, M. (2022). Educator and staff perspectives on a rights-based sex education for young men in jail and prison in Sweden. Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, 23(1), 114-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Educator and staff perspectives on a rights-based sex education for young men in jail and prison in Sweden
2022 (English)In: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 114-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Young men in jail and prison are vulnerable regarding sexual health and the fulfilment of their sexual rights. As a response to this, the Swedish Association for Sexuality Education (RFSU) has been providing sex education to young, incarcerated men, via a project initiated by and in cooperation with the Swedish Prison and Probation Services (SPPS). This article is a qualitative exploration of how RFSU educators experienced their work, and of how staff within SPPS experienced the initiative. Eight RFSU educators, and six persons working within SPPS were interviewed, and a thematic analysis was conducted. Overall, the experiences described by RFSU educators and by SPPS staff were similar, they regarded sex education sensitive to what young men wanted to discuss as valuable and the project feasible. Future improvement areas include strategies on how to handle toxic masculinity among young men in jail and prison. Additionally his, the different aims that the organisations RFSU and SPPS have, and how young men navigate them, must be acknowledged. Young men’s voices are missing in this study, and examining their experiences of the sex education in future work would be valuable. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Duty-holders, holistic sex education, jail, incarcerated people, prison, rights-based sex education, right-bearers
National Category
Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-50497 (URN)10.1080/14681811.2022.2034113 (DOI)000750375100001 ()2-s2.0-85124274366 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-03-09 Created: 2022-03-09 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Kristina, A.-J. & Lindroth, M. (2022). Exploring the role of sexual attitude reassessment and restructuring (SAR) in current sexology education: for whom, how and why?. Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, 22(6), 723-740
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Exploring the role of sexual attitude reassessment and restructuring (SAR) in current sexology education: for whom, how and why?
2022 (English)In: Sex Education: Sexuality, Society and Learning, ISSN 1468-1811, E-ISSN 1472-0825, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 723-740Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

As concerns about sexual and reproductive health and rights become integrated into public health policies, the demand for higher education in sexology rises. There is a need therefore to evaluate established pedagogical methods to ensure that they are relevant, efficient and lead to valuable competencies. This study explored the current evidence and pedagogical relevance for Sexual Attitude Reassessment and restructuring (SAR) as part of professional higher education in sexology. A systematic review was conducted with eleven included publications. Data were synthesised across studies and presented narratively. The publications were generally old and derive from a small pool of researchers geographically centred to the USA. Several studies were based on small numbers of participants, display a great variety in types of participants, use different evaluation instruments (mostly unvalidated), and a variety of methods to measure the results of SAR. Furthermore, long-term follow-up has been rare. Extensive, high-quality, and up-to-date research for SAR as an effective pedagogical method for use in sexology higher education for professionals today is lacking. Digital solutions focusing on broadening students sexological self-awareness appear more feasible than SAR, and suitable pedagogical and digital solutions need to be developed and evaluated to ensure high-quality teaching of sexology in higher education. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2022
Keywords
Education, higher education, Nordic SAR/SSA, pedagogical relevance, SAR, sexologist: sexology, sexual attitude reassessment and restructuring
National Category
Pedagogy
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-49645 (URN)10.1080/14681811.2021.2011188 (DOI)000742286900001 ()2-s2.0-85122853584 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-01-25 Created: 2022-01-25 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Schindele, A. C., Josefsson-Areskoug, K. & Lindroth, M. (2022). Intersecting social determinants in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) among young people. In: : . Paper presented at Futures Ahead, Linköping, 15-17 juni, 2022.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intersecting social determinants in sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) among young people
2022 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
National Category
Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-51480 (URN)
Conference
Futures Ahead, Linköping, 15-17 juni, 2022
Available from: 2022-05-16 Created: 2022-05-16 Last updated: 2022-06-02Bibliographically approved
Björklund, F. & Lindroth, M. (2022). “It’s easier to think outside the box when you are already outside the box”: A study of transgender and non-binary people’s sexual well-being. Sexualities
Open this publication in new window or tab >>“It’s easier to think outside the box when you are already outside the box”: A study of transgender and non-binary people’s sexual well-being
2022 (English)In: Sexualities, ISSN 1363-4607, E-ISSN 1461-7382Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

With a phenomenological approach, we explored transgender and non-binary people’s strategies to experience sexual well-being. Ten self-reports (seven interviews and three written texts) were analyzed, and the analysis resulted in six themes. The first three (Affirming oneself, Having access to care, and Being respected as one’s gender) were strategies for sexual well-being realized through affirming one’s identity, receiving the gender-confirming care wanted, and having one’s gender identity respected by others. The other three themes (Masturbating and fantasizing, Communicating and being open, and Being sexually free in queer spaces) were strategies for one aspect of sexual well-being—pleasure. The results describe strategies that all can learn from: the need to accept and appreciate oneself, not just adapt to gender norms of bodies and behaviors, and to communicate. In addition, it illuminates that being norm-breaking, or stepping out of the gendered paths presented to you, appears to provide new opportunities for people to learn what they enjoy, and this could lead to a broader repertoire of pleasurable sexual practices—practices that take bodily prerequisites into account

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2022
Keywords
Cis-normativity, erotic structuralism, heteronormativity, sexual scripts, trans-normativity
National Category
Other Social Sciences Social Sciences Interdisciplinary
Research subject
Health and society
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-51631 (URN)10.1177/13634607221103214 (DOI)000805407300001 ()2-s2.0-85130943872 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2022-05-25 Created: 2022-05-25 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-5637-5106

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