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Boda, Chad, Associate ProfessorORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3837-3510
Alternative names
Biography [eng]

I conduct research at the intersection of sustainable development, natural resource management, and collective action/social movements, as well as maintaining a keen interest in philosophy of science and methodology in inter/trans-disciplinary research. I am currently working with farmer based rural social movements in SSA as part of a large comparative project in Ghana, Uganda and Zimbabwe. My teaching is also interdisciplinary, including mainstream and ecological economics, social theory, physical geography and ecology.

Publications (10 of 33) Show all publications
Benson, M., Boda, C., Das, R. R., King, L. & Park, C. (2023). Illuminating practitioner challenges in energy transitions. Heliyon, 9(12), e22624-e22624, Article ID e22624.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Illuminating practitioner challenges in energy transitions
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2023 (English)In: Heliyon, ISSN 2405-8440, Vol. 9, no 12, p. e22624-e22624, article id e22624Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainable development (SD) is a concept that can be used to address complex challenges, including energy transitions. SD offers diverse strategies that provide useful direction in navigating tensions, trade-offs and synergies in energy transitions. The purpose of this research was to identify the challenges that energy practitioners are faced with in energy transitions and explore potential solutions. To achieve this purpose, we identified and explored the challenges faced by energy practitioners in Canada. Specifically, we conducted a survey of 34 energy practitioners from across Canada, as well as in-depth interviews with the Energy Futures Lab design team (which is a civil society initiative actively working on the energy transition in Canada).

We identified the following challenges faced by energy practitioners in Canada: there is no simple, single solution for energy transitions; energy transitions have potentially conflicting considerations; energy systems have potentially conflicting goals; energy practitioners have different levels of trust and competencies in key actors; energy practitioners need to work across the political spectrum; and the costs and benefits of energy transitions are unevenly distributed. We discuss how the three strategies of SD (i.e., economic choice, political choice, social choice) could be applied to manage the intended and unintended tensions and trade-offs inherent in energy transitions. We conclude that the three SD strategies are not always equally valued by energy practitioners, but they have the potential to be useful in different energy transitions scenarios.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Energy transitions, Sustainable development, Canada
National Category
Energy Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-64228 (URN)10.1016/j.heliyon.2023.e22624 (DOI)001125060300001 ()38076189 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85177892034 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-12-11 Created: 2023-12-11 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Ellinor, I., Boda, C., Akorsu, A. D., Armah, F. A., Atwiine, A., Bagaga, R., . . . Owor, A. (2023). Rural social movements and sustainable agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa: towards a collaborative research agenda. Interface: a journal for and about social movements, 14(1), 22-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Rural social movements and sustainable agricultural development in sub-Saharan Africa: towards a collaborative research agenda
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2023 (English)In: Interface: a journal for and about social movements, E-ISSN 2009-2431, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 22-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Agriculture is key to sustainable development globally – particularly in countries where agriculture both accounts for most of the land use and provides a livelihood for most of the population. We map out a collaborative research agenda aimed at tackling the urgent but poorly understood issue of the role of farmer organisations in overcoming political barriers to sustainable and inclusive agricultural development, with particular attention to sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Building on a critical and collaborative dialogue between a diversity of small-scale farmer-led organisations, local activist groups, transnational civil society networks, and heterogeneous academic institutions, our agenda is organized around two key objectives: 1) understanding the conditions for, development of and outcomes from farmer-based political mobilisation in rural areas; and 2) strengthening participatory, action-oriented research capacity for critically engaged research on agrarian questions in SSA. The approach we advocate emphasises the scientific and societal benefits of combining theoretically informed crosscountry comparison of farmer-based rural social movements, with deepening of academic-civil society collaboration

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Interface journal, 2023
National Category
Human Geography
Research subject
Sustainable studies
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-63167 (URN)
Available from: 2023-10-16 Created: 2023-10-16 Last updated: 2023-10-20Bibliographically approved
Boda, C. S., O’Byrne, D., Harnesk, D., Faran, T. & Isgren, E. (2022). A collective alternative to the Inward Turn in environmental sustainability research. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 12(2), 291-297
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A collective alternative to the Inward Turn in environmental sustainability research
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2022 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, ISSN 2190-6483, E-ISSN 2190-6491, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 291-297Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

It has become quite common in environmental sustainability research to promote the influencing of so-called inner dimensions of individuals as means to address pressing environmental problems such as climate change, what we refer to as the Inward Turn. We argue that the conceptual foundations of the Inward Turn, an extreme form of methodological individualism, limit it significantly as a strategy for addressing climate change and other socially relevant environmental problems. After briefly reviewing major shortcomings with the way the Inward Turn conceptualizes the relationship between individuals and social change, including its neglect of causal structures and propensity to abstract its analysis away from problems that are specific to place and time, we sketch the basic tenets of an alternative methodological approach capable of overcoming these limitations. Our approach, however, does not go to the other extreme and neglect the role of individuals; rather, our recognition of the structural drivers of particular environmental problems points to the necessity of specific collective actions by individuals, for example, in the practice of social movements. This recognition demands a rethinking of the role of individual factors, like emotion and empathy, in addressing environmental sustainability problems, namely as they relate to collective action/social movement emergence, development, and outcomes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59559 (URN)10.1007/s13412-021-00738-6 (DOI)000722792000002 ()2-s2.0-85119984290 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Boda, C., Scown, M. W. & Faran, T. (2022). Forgotten coast, forgotten people: sustainable development and disproportionate impacts from Hurricane Michael in Gulf County, Florida. Natural Hazards (111), 1-23
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Forgotten coast, forgotten people: sustainable development and disproportionate impacts from Hurricane Michael in Gulf County, Florida
2022 (English)In: Natural Hazards, ISSN 0921-030X, E-ISSN 1573-0840, no 111, p. 1-23Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

A central challenge for sustainable development is how societies are to avoid, minimize or address impacts from anthropogenic climate change. However, competing perspectives on “what should be sustained” lead to widely different understandings of what mitigation, adaptation and loss and damage entail and how best to approach them. We provide a novel conceptual and empirical comparison of two contrasting sustainable development-based approaches to the study of impacts from climate-related extreme events: Capital Theory and capability-based Human Development. We use our analysis of immediate residential property value and housing capacity impacts caused by Hurricane Michael in Gulf County, Florida, to demonstrate how the sustainable development theory used to assess and interpret impacts greatly affects the identification of whom and where is objectively “most impacted.” Through a comparison of the two approaches, we identify relative advantages and disadvantages, emphasizing that while both provide coherent, comprehensive, and integrative approaches to climate-related impact assessment, the capability approach is much less likely to lead researchers and practitioners to overlook the most disadvantaged communities when compared to Capital Theory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59555 (URN)10.1007/s11069-021-05082-0 (DOI)000712794400003 ()2-s2.0-85118257984 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Benson, M., Boda, C., Das, R. R., King, L. & Park, C. (2022). Sustainable Development and Canada’s Transitioning Energy Systems. Sustainability, 14(4), 2213
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sustainable Development and Canada’s Transitioning Energy Systems
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2022 (English)In: Sustainability, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 2213-Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

An energy transition is unfolding in Canada and across the world. During this transition, countries are facing increasing demands for their energy systems to address economic, social, and environmental considerations, including providing affordable and reliable energy, reducing inequality, and producing fewer environmental impacts. First, we identify key themes from the academic literature related to energy transitions: the systems perspective; economic, social, and environmental considerations; collaboration and dialogue; and social innovation. Second, we focus on a case study of a critical actor in Canada’s energy transition, the Energy Futures Lab (EFL), a social innovation lab that is actively working on the energy transition in Canada. We interviewed members of the EFL design team to investigate and deepen our understanding of the key themes identified in the academic literature. Third, we discuss how our research results relate to innovation and governance in the energy transition in Canada, and we offer an Integrated Model of Sustainable Development (SD) to help manage the common affairs of the energy transition. Fourth, we offer a theoretical contribution, arguing that both the ends and the means should be considered in an energy transition. It is important to keep in mind the overarching objective, or end, of the energy transition (e.g., alignment with the sustainability principles) to create the energy system that the future requires of us. Finally, we offer a practical contribution to show that SD can help inform a collaborative approach, that promotes innovation and increases knowledge, in an effort to address complex sustainability challenges.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59557 (URN)10.3390/su14042213 (DOI)000767962800001 ()2-s2.0-85124820860 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Boda, C. S. & Harnesk, D. (2022). Three crucial considerations when presenting alternative paradigms in sustainability research. Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, 12(3), 652-656
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Three crucial considerations when presenting alternative paradigms in sustainability research
2022 (English)In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, ISSN 2190-6483, E-ISSN 2190-6491, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 652-656Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainability science (SS) is diverse field of problem-driven and solution-oriented research that is still developing. The further maturation of the field relies on its practitioners formulating alternative paradigms to use-inspired knowledge production to facilitate comparison and reasoned judgment on what constitutes scientific best practices. In this short article, we flag several blind spots that can arise in attempts to articulate potential paradigms in SS. We identify and discuss three crucial components that should be included when constructing and presenting potential paradigms in the field, namely the necessity of 1) comparing suggested alternatives with available competitors, 2) preserving scientific integrity in scientific knowledge production, and 3) clarifying the particular contribution of scientific knowledge to social change. Keeping sight of these three important issues will allow the still developing field of SS to mature in a way that builds on scientific comparison and reasoned judgment among the field’s practitioners, with implications for advancing its research agenda. The issues we outline here should not only concern authors, but reviewers and editors of SS journals as well. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2022
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59556 (URN)10.1007/s13412-022-00758-w (DOI)000769833000001 ()2-s2.0-85126350392 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Boda, C., Scown, M., Faran, T., Nastar, M., Dorkenoo, K., Chaffin, B. & Boyd, E. (2021). Framing Loss and Damage from climate change as the failure of Sustainable Development. Climate and Development, 13(8), 677-684
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Framing Loss and Damage from climate change as the failure of Sustainable Development
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2021 (English)In: Climate and Development, ISSN 1756-5529, E-ISSN 1756-5537, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 677-684Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2021
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59558 (URN)10.1080/17565529.2020.1851640 (DOI)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-05-24Bibliographically approved
Boda, C. S., Faran, T., Scown, M., Dorkenoo, K., Chaffin, B. C., Nastar, M. & Boyd, E. (2021). Loss and damage from climate change and implicit assumptions of sustainable development. Climatic Change, 164, 1-18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Loss and damage from climate change and implicit assumptions of sustainable development
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2021 (English)In: Climatic Change, ISSN 0165-0009, E-ISSN 1573-1480, Vol. 164, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Loss and damage from climate change, recognized as a unique research and policy domain through the Warsaw International Mechanism (WIM) in 2013, has drawn increasing attention among climate scientists and policy makers. Labelled by some as the “third pillar” of the international climate regime—along with mitigation and adaptation—it has been suggested that loss and damage has the potential to catalyze important synergies with other international agendas, particularly sustainable development. However, the specific approaches to sustainable development that inform loss and damage research and how these approaches influence research outcomes and policy recommendations remain largely unexplored. We offer a systematic analysis of the assumptions of sustainable development that underpins loss and damage scholarship through a comprehensive review of peer-reviewed research on loss and damage. We demonstrate that the use of specific metrics, decision criteria, and policy prescriptions by loss and damage researchers and practitioners implies an unwitting adherence to different underlying theories of sustainable development, which in turn impact how loss and damage is conceptualized and applied. In addition to research and policy implications, our review suggests that assumptions about the aims of sustainable development determine how loss and damage is conceptualized, measured, and governed, and the human development approach currently represents the most advanced perspective on sustainable development and thus loss and damage. This review supports sustainable development as a coherent, comprehensive, and integrative framework for guiding further conceptual and empirical development of loss and damage scholarship.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2021
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59560 (URN)10.1007/s10584-021-02970-z (DOI)000612855100002 ()2-s2.0-85099787250 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Boda, C. S. (2021). Values, science, and competing paradigms in sustainability research: furthering the conversation. Sustainability Science, 16(6), 2157-2161
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Values, science, and competing paradigms in sustainability research: furthering the conversation
2021 (English)In: Sustainability Science, ISSN 1862-4065, E-ISSN 1862-4057, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 2157-2161Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sustainability science is fundamentally a problem-driven and solutions-oriented science which necessitates engagement with questions of interdisciplinarity and normativity. Nagatsu et al. (2020) recently investigated the significance of these peculiar characteristics and produce a useful and timely overview of the problems facing sustainability science, as a science. Perhaps the most crucial and crosscutting challenge they identify regards the need for researchers to justify the particular values guiding sustainability research. In the spirit of advancing Nagatsu et al.’s agenda for further developing the role of values in sustainability science, I argue two things. First, that there are in practice several active and competing approaches to dealing with the problem of normativity in sustainablity science that provide options to researchers. Second, that this unresolved tension at the core of sustainability science points to a more overarching problem, namely the need to more explicitly identify coherent, competing research paradigms within the field.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2021
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59561 (URN)10.1007/s11625-021-01025-7 (DOI)000685596900002 ()2-s2.0-85112813636 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-07-05Bibliographically approved
Otto, F. E., Harrington, L. J., Frame, D., Boyd, E., Lauta, K. C., Wehner, M., . . . Hauser, M. (2020). Toward an inventory of the impacts of human-induced climate change. Bulletin of The American Meteorological Society - (BAMS), 101(11), E1972-E1979
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Toward an inventory of the impacts of human-induced climate change
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2020 (English)In: Bulletin of The American Meteorological Society - (BAMS), ISSN 0003-0007, E-ISSN 1520-0477, Vol. 101, no 11, p. E1972-E1979Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Human Geography
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-59562 (URN)
Available from: 2023-05-16 Created: 2023-05-16 Last updated: 2023-05-24Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-3837-3510

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