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Wennerberg, Ann
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Publications (10 of 186) Show all publications
Reinedahl, D., Johansson, P., Galli, S., Kjellin, P., Albrektsson, T. & Wennerberg, A. (2022). Review of PEEK implants and biomechanical and immunological responses to a zirconium phosphate nano-coated PEEK, a blasted PEEK, and a turned titanium implant surface.. American Journal of Dentistry, 35(2), 152-160
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Review of PEEK implants and biomechanical and immunological responses to a zirconium phosphate nano-coated PEEK, a blasted PEEK, and a turned titanium implant surface.
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2022 (English)In: American Journal of Dentistry, ISSN 0894-8275, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 152-160Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: To investigate the biomechanical and immunological reactions to coated and non-coated blasted PEEK implants in vivo after 12 weeks and review the associated literature.

METHODS: Two osteotomy sites were performed in each proximal tibia of 10 lop-eared rabbits (n= 4 per rabbit). Each rabbit received a randomly placed (1) blasted zirconium phosphate nano-coated PEEK- (nano-ZrP), (2) blasted PEEK- (PEEK) and (3) titanium implant (Ti) and an empty sham site. At 12 weeks, removal torque of all implants and biological investigation with qPCR was performed. The implant surfaces were analyzed prior to insertion with interferometry, SEM and XPS.

RESULTS: The interferometry analysis showed that there was no difference in roughness for the uncoated PEEK compared to the ZrP coated PEEK implants. The titanium implants were considerably smoother (Sa= 0.23 µm) than the uncoated Sa= 1.11 µm) and ZrP coated PEEK implants (Sa= 1.12 µm). SEM analysis on the PEEK implants corroborated the interferometry results; no difference in structure between the uncoated vs. the ZrP coated PEEK was visible on the micrometer level. At higher magnifications, the ZrP coating was visible in the SEM as a thin, porous network. All tested implants displayed osseointegration with the highest RTQ for nano-ZrP (18.4 Ncm) followed by PEEK (14.5 Ncm) and Ti (11.5 Ncm). All implants activated the immune system, with elevated macrophage and M2 macrophage qPCR markers at 12 weeks compared to the sham site.

CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Nano-ZrP coating improves osseointegration of blasted PEEK implants at 12 weeks of follow-up. Osseointegration of titanium, PEEK and nano-ZrP PEEK is not a normal bone healing process, but rather a shield-off mechanism that appears to be regulated by the innate immune system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Mosher & Linder, Inc., 2022
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-56285 (URN)000893228600008 ()35798711 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2022-11-29 Created: 2022-11-29 Last updated: 2023-09-07Bibliographically approved
Albrektsson, T., Dahlin, C., Reinedahl, D., Tengvall, P., Trindade, R. & Wennerberg, A. (2020). An Imbalance of the Immune System Instead of a Disease Behind Marginal Bone Loss Around Oral Implants: Position Paper. International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, 35(3), 495-502
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Imbalance of the Immune System Instead of a Disease Behind Marginal Bone Loss Around Oral Implants: Position Paper
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Oral & Maxillofacial Implants, ISSN 0882-2786, E-ISSN 1942-4434, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 495-502Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present evidence that supports the notion that the primary reason behind marginal bone loss and implant failure is immune-based and that bacterial actions in the great majority of problematic cases are of a secondary nature. Materials and Methods: The paper is written as a narrative review. Results: Evidence is presented that commercially pure titanium is not biologically inert, but instead activates the innate immune system of the body. For its function, the clinical implant is dependent on an immune/inflammatory defense against bacteria. Biologic models such as ligature studies have incorrectly assumed that the primary response causing marginal bone loss is due to bacterial action. In reality, bacterial actions are secondary to an imbalance of the innate immune system caused by the combination of titanium implants and ligatures, ie, nonself. This immunologic imbalance may lead to marginal bone resorption even in the absence of bacteria. Conclusion: Marginal bone loss and imminent oral implant failure cannot be properly analyzed without a clear understanding of immunologically caused tissue responses.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
QUINTESSENCE PUBLISHING CO INC, 2020
Keywords
biomaterials, failure analysis, immunologic reactions, peri-implantitis, review (narrative)
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-17501 (URN)10.11607/jomi.8218 (DOI)000532806800008 ()32406645 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85084717808 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-06-16 Created: 2020-06-16 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Zeller-Plumhoff, B., Malich, C., Krüger, D., Campbell, G., Wiese, B., Galli, S., . . . Wieland, D. C. (2020). Analysis of the bone ultrastructure around biodegradable Mg-xGd implants using small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. (ed.). Acta Biomaterialia, 101(1), 637-645
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Analysis of the bone ultrastructure around biodegradable Mg-xGd implants using small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction.
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2020 (English)In: Acta Biomaterialia, ISSN 1742-7061, E-ISSN 1878-7568, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 637-645Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Magnesium alloys are increasingly researched as temporary biodegradable metal implants in bone applications due to their mechanical properties which are more similar to bone than conventional implant metals and the fact that Magnesium occurs naturally within the body. However, the degradation processes in vivo and in particular the interaction of the bone with the degrading material need to be further investigated. In this study we are presenting the first quantitative comparison of the bone ultrastructure formed at the interface of biodegradable Mg-5Gd and Mg-10Gd implants and titanium and PEEK implants after 4, 8 and 12 weeks healing time using two-dimensional small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. Differences in mineralization, orientation and thickness of the hydroxyapatite are assessed. We find statistically significant (p<0.05) differences for the lattice spacing of the (310)-reflex of hydroxyapatite between titanium and Mg-xGd materials, as well as for the (310) crystal size between titanium and Mg-5Gd, indicating a possible deposition of Mg within the bone matrix. The (310) lattice spacing and crystallite size further differ significantly between implant degradation layer and surrounding bone (p

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2020
Keywords
Biodegradable magnesium implants, Bone ultrastructure, Bone-implant interface
National Category
Biomaterials Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-6310 (URN)10.1016/j.actbio.2019.11.030 (DOI)000504504300051 ()31734411 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85075900585 (Scopus ID)30480 (Local ID)30480 (Archive number)30480 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-02-28 Created: 2020-02-28 Last updated: 2024-04-10Bibliographically approved
Gjelvold, B., Kisch, J., Mohammed, D. M., Chrcanovic, B. R., Albrektsson, T. & Wennerberg, A. (2020). Immediate Loading of Single Implants, Guided Surgery, and Intraoral Scanning: A Nonrandomized Study. International Journal of Prosthodontics, 33(5), 513-522
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Immediate Loading of Single Implants, Guided Surgery, and Intraoral Scanning: A Nonrandomized Study
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2020 (English)In: International Journal of Prosthodontics, ISSN 0893-2174, E-ISSN 1139-9791, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 513-522Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: To compare clinical and esthetic outcomes between immediately loaded single implants placed with and without a fully guided surgical procedure. Materials and Methods: Patients with a missing maxillary tooth (second premolar to second premolar) were considered for inclusion in this 1-year prospective nonrandomized study. Exclusion criteria were general health contraindications for oral surgery besides the need for bone grafting or ridge augmentation. One group received digital implant planning, fully guided surgery, and immediate loading (DIL). The other group received freehand surgery and immediate loading (IL). Outcome measures were implant survival, marginal bone loss, soft tissue changes, papilla index, pink and white esthetic scores (PES and WES, respectively), and patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). Results: Two of 21 implants failed in the DIL group soon after placement, resulting in a 1-year implant survival rate of 90.5%, while no implants failed in the IL group. Significantly higher papilla index scores and lower soft tissue changes were found for the DIL group compared to the IL group. No differences were found after 1 year regarding marginal bone loss, PES, WES, or PROMs. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, immediate loading in combination with fully guided surgery might negatively affect implant survival. Immediate loading, fully guided surgery, and a digital workflow appear to have a positive effect on early soft tissue adaptation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence publishing co inc, 2020
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-18620 (URN)10.11607/ijp.6701 (DOI)000571425900005 ()32956432 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85091458761 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-10-13 Created: 2020-10-13 Last updated: 2024-04-05Bibliographically approved
Moosmann, J., Wieland, F., Zeller-Plumhoff, B., Galli, S., Krüger, D., Ershov, A., . . . Beckmann, F. (2019). A load frame for in situ tomography at PETRA III (ed.). In: (Ed.), Developments in X-Ray Tomography XII: . Paper presented at SPIE Optical Engineering + Applications, San Diego, California, United States (2019). SPIE - The International Society for Optics and Photonics, Article ID 1111318.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A load frame for in situ tomography at PETRA III
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2019 (English)In: Developments in X-Ray Tomography XII, SPIE - The International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2019, article id 1111318Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

A load frame for in situ mechanical testing is developed for the microtomography end stations at the imaging beamline P05 and the high-energy material science beamline P07 of PETRA III at DESY, both operated by the Helmholtz- Zentrum Geesthacht. The load frame is fully integrated into the beamline control system and can be controlled via a feedback loop. All relevant parameters (load, displacement, temperature, etc.) are continuously logged. It can be operated in compression or tensile mode applying forces of up to 1 kN and is compatible with all contrast modalities available at IBL and HEMS i.e. conventional attenuation contrast, propagation based phase contrast and differential phase contrast using a grating interferometer. The modularity and flexibility of the load frame allows conducting a wide range of experiments. E.g. compression tests to understand the failure mechanisms in biodegradable implants in rat bone or to investigate the mechanics and kinematics of the tessellated cartilage skeleton of sharks and rays, or tensile tests to illuminate the structure-property relationship in poplar tension wood or to visualize the 3D deformation of the tendonbone insertion. We present recent results from the experiments described including machine-learning driven volume segmentation and digital volume correlation of load tomography sequences.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
SPIE - The International Society for Optics and Photonics, 2019
Series
Proceedings, ISSN 0277-786X ; 11113
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-12177 (URN)10.1117/12.2530445 (DOI)2-s2.0-85077795454 (Scopus ID)30547 (Local ID)30547 (Archive number)30547 (OAI)
Conference
SPIE Optical Engineering + Applications, San Diego, California, United States (2019)
Available from: 2020-02-29 Created: 2020-02-29 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Gjelvold, B., Mahmood, D. J. & Wennerberg, A. (2019). Accuracy of surgical guides from 2 different desktop 3D printers for computed tomography-guided surgery. The Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Print), 121(3), 498-503, Article ID S0022-3913(18)30677-2.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Accuracy of surgical guides from 2 different desktop 3D printers for computed tomography-guided surgery
2019 (English)In: The Journal of prosthetic dentistry (Print), ISSN 0022-3913, E-ISSN 1097-6841, Vol. 121, no 3, p. 498-503, article id S0022-3913(18)30677-2Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM: Different factors influence the degree of deviation in dental implant position after computed tomography-guided surgery. The surgical guide-manufacturing process with desktop 3D printers is such a factor, but its accuracy has not been fully evaluated.

PURPOSE: The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the deviation in final dental implant position after the use of surgical guides fabricated from 2 different desktop 3D printers using a digital workflow.

MATERIAL AND METHODS: Twenty 3D-printed resin models were prepared with missing maxillary premolar. After preoperative planning, 10 surgical guides were produced with a stereolithography printer and 10 with a digital light-processing (DLP) printer. A guided surgery was performed; 20 dental implants (3.8×12 mm) were installed, and a digital scan of the dental implants was made. Deviations between the planned and final position of the dental implants were evaluated for both the groups.

RESULTS: A statistically significant difference between stereolithography and DLP were found for deviation at entry point (P=.023) and the vertical implant position (P=.009). Overall lower deviations were found for the guides from the DLP printer, with the exception of deviation in horizontal implant position.

CONCLUSIONS: The tested desktop 3D printers were able to produce surgical guides with similar deviations with regard to the final dental implant position, but the DLP printer proved more accurate concerning deviations at entry point and vertical implant position.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-17194 (URN)10.1016/j.prosdent.2018.08.009 (DOI)000460655400023 ()30442377 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85056421631 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2020-05-07 Created: 2020-05-07 Last updated: 2024-02-05Bibliographically approved
Reinedahl, D., Galli, S., Albrektsson, T., Tengvall, P., Johansson, C. B., Hammarström Johansson, P. & Wennerberg, A. (2019). Aseptic Ligatures Induce Marginal Peri-Implant Bone Loss-An 8-Week Trial in Rabbits (ed.). Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(8)
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Aseptic Ligatures Induce Marginal Peri-Implant Bone Loss-An 8-Week Trial in Rabbits
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The clinical value of ligature-induced experimental peri-implantitis studies has been questioned due to the artificial nature of the model. Despite repeated claims that ligatures of silk, cotton and other materials may not induce bone resorption by themselves; a recent review showed that the tissue reaction toward them has not been investigated. Hence, the current study aimed to explore the hard and soft tissue reactions toward commonly used ligature materials. A total of 60 dental implants were inserted into the femur ( = 20) and tibia ( = 40) of 10 rabbits. The femoral implants were ligated with sterile 3-0 braided silk in one leg and sterile cotton retraction chord in the other leg. The tibial implants were ligated with silk or left as non-ligated controls. All wounds were closed in layers. After a healing time of 8 weeks, femoral (silk versus cotton) and proximal tibial (silk versus non-ligated control) implants were investigated histologically. Distal tibial (silk versus non-ligated control) implants were investigated with real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The distance from the implant-top to first bone contact point was longer for silk ligated implants compared to non-ligated controls ( = 0.007), but did not vary between cotton and silk. The ligatures triggered an immunological reaction with cell infiltrates in close contact with the ligature materials, adjacent soft tissue encapsulation and bone resorption. qPCR further demonstrated an upregulated immune response toward the silk ligatures compared to non-ligated controls. Silk and cotton ligatures provoke foreign body reactions of soft tissue encapsulation type and bone resorption around implants in the absence of plaque.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
aseptic loosening, dental implant, ligature induced peri-implantitis, marginal bone loss, osseointegration
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15787 (URN)10.3390/jcm8081248 (DOI)000483737700035 ()31426572 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85087705030 (Scopus ID)30038 (Local ID)30038 (Archive number)30038 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Trindade, R., Albrektsson, T., Galli, S., Prgomet, Z., Tengvall, P. & Wennerberg, A. (2019). Bone Immune Response to Materials, Part II: Copper and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Compared to Titanium at 10 and 28 Days in Rabbit Tibia (ed.). Journal of Clinical Medicine, 8(6), Article ID 814.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Bone Immune Response to Materials, Part II: Copper and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Compared to Titanium at 10 and 28 Days in Rabbit Tibia
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2019 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Medicine, E-ISSN 2077-0383, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 814Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Abstract: Osseointegration is likely the result of an immunologically driven bone reaction to materials such as titanium. Osseointegration has resulted in the clinical possibility to anchor oral implants in jaw bone tissue. However, the mechanisms behind bony anchorage are not fully understood and complications over a longer period of time have been reported. The current study aims at exploring possible differences between copper (Cu) and polyetheretherketone (PEEK) materials that do not osseointegrate, with osseointegrating cp titanium as control. The implants were placed in rabbit tibia and selected immune markers were evaluated at 10 and 28 days of follow-up. Cu and PEEK demonstrated at both time points a higher immune activation than cp titanium. Cu demonstrated distance osteogenesis due to a maintained proinflammatory environment over time, and PEEK failed to osseointegrate due to an immunologically defined preferential adipose tissue formation on its surface. The here presented results suggest the description of two different mechanisms for failed osseointegration, both of which are correlated to the immune system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MDPI, 2019
Keywords
biomaterial, bone, osseointegration, immune, implant, healing, titanium, PEEK, Cu
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15822 (URN)10.3390/jcm8060814 (DOI)000475349300058 ()31181635 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85076136759 (Scopus ID)28805 (Local ID)28805 (Archive number)28805 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-03-27Bibliographically approved
Toia, M., Galli, S., Denis, C., Wennerberg, A. & Jimbo, R. (2019). Clinical Evidence of OsseoSpeed EV Implants: A Retrospective Study and Characterization of the Newly Introduced System (ed.). The international journal of periodontics & restorative dentistry, 39(6), 863-874
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Clinical Evidence of OsseoSpeed EV Implants: A Retrospective Study and Characterization of the Newly Introduced System
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2019 (English)In: The international journal of periodontics & restorative dentistry, ISSN 0198-7569, E-ISSN 1945-3388, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 863-874Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This retrospective study sought to compare a new implant (Astra Tech OsseoSpeed EV) with its predecessor (Astra Tech OsseoSpeed TX) by scanning electron microscopy and interferometry. Radiographic data from 19 patients who underwent implant restoration with EV (n = 49) with a median follow-up of 16 months were evaluated for mean bone level (MBL) changes from delivery of the definitive prosthesis. EV and TX did not differ in surface roughness, and both systems had a tight seal at the implant-abutment interface. The median MBL change of the EV was -0.02 mm mesiodistally after a median follow-up period of 16 months. Greater maintenance of MBL was found in the screw-retained restorations (n = 17) compared to cemented (0.35 ± 0.33 mm and -0.38 ± 0.76 mm, respectively; P = .03). The data suggest that EV shows minimal levels of bone loss and high implant survival.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Quintessence, 2019
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15649 (URN)10.11607/prd.2549 (DOI)000489946800015 ()28834532 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85073181460 (Scopus ID)23842 (Local ID)23842 (Archive number)23842 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Chrcanovic, B. R., Kisch, J. & Wennerberg, A. (2019). Dental implants in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome: a case series and a systematic review (ed.). International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 48(9), 1250-1259
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dental implants in patients with Sjögren’s syndrome: a case series and a systematic review
2019 (English)In: International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, ISSN 0901-5027, E-ISSN 1399-0020, Vol. 48, no 9, p. 1250-1259Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The purpose of the present study was to assess the clinical outcome of dental implants in a series of patients with Sjögren’s syndrome (SS), as well as review of the literature. The study consisted of two parts: report of a case series and a systematic review. Results of the clinical series: 19 patients received 107 implants, followed for a mean of 125 months. Two patients lost 3 implants (failure rate 2.80%, 3/107). At the last follow-up, there was a mean±SD marginal bone loss (MBL) of -2.190±1.384 mm. Estimation of 4.39 mm of MBL after 30 years. Results of the review: 19 studies, including the present clinical series, with 712 implants in 186 patients (failure rate 4.11%, 29/705; failed at a mean time of 12.9±31.7 months), followed up for a mean of 72.5 months. The probability of failure was 2.8% (95% CI 1.6%, 4.1%). Primary SS had lower implant failure rate (2.54%, 3/118) than secondary SS patients (6.52%, 12/184). As a conclusion, dental implants should be considered by dentists as a viable treatment option in patients with SS, as the failure rate is fairly low. The SS patients may, however, present a higher MBL around implants than in the general population.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Sjögren’s syndrome, Oral rehabilitation, Dental implant, Failure, Marginal bone loss
National Category
Dentistry
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:mau:diva-15701 (URN)10.1016/j.ijom.2019.02.005 (DOI)000483650000016 ()30827571 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85062157974 (Scopus ID)28130 (Local ID)28130 (Archive number)28130 (OAI)
Available from: 2020-03-30 Created: 2020-03-30 Last updated: 2024-04-08Bibliographically approved
Projects
On Failure and success of oral implants; Malmö UniversityFailure in Biodegradable Metal Implants; Malmö University
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